Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


job cuts

Journalists from five Irish Johnston Press Group newspapers intend to go on strike next Tuesday after hearing of possible staff cuts that will occur as a result of putting a new editorial production system in place that the publisher's management thinks will abolish the need for sub-editors, MediaGuardian reported.

"This strike is about protecting employment but it is also about defending journalistic standards," said Nicola Coleman, the organiser for the National Union of Journalists in Ireland. "The experience of this union in the UK is that the new system and reduced staffing levels have led to chaos - the results have been disastrous publications."

Image: Top News

Coleman added that papers were sent to the printing press with missing pictures, erroneous headlines, "serious" subbing mistakes and once, without a bar code (meaning that shops weren't able to sell that issue), the Press Gazette added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-18 19:12

The four largest newspapers in Spain--El Paí­s, El Mundo, ABC and La Razón-- eliminated 906 work positions between 2003 and 2009, PRNoticias reported yesterday. These layoffs represent 39 percent of the 2,325 staff members the dailies had seven years ago.

El Pais, which continues to be the largest employer, has reduced its payroll by 43 percent from 891 employees to 507. According to PRNoticias, the reduction does not mean that all the jobs have been lost because the Prisa Group transferred some of the newspaper's divisions to other parts of the company.

However, the steeper reduction was introduced by ABC, which cut by half its personnel from 774 to 375 staff members. El Mundo also has less staff as it reduced its staff by 35 percent from 446 people.

PRNoticias revealed that La Razon is the only newspaper that managed to increase its work positions since 2003. Now, it has 247 employees on its payroll, up from the 214 it had seven years ago.

According to the 2010 Report of the Journalistic Profession, released last week by Universidad de Malaga, 6,500 Spanish journalists are currently unemployed and the number is expected to increase to almost 10,000 by end of 2010, Xornal de Galicia reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-13 18:54

Trinity Mirror is planning to cut four editor positions in its Celtic weekly titles and replace them with a single editor-in-chief, Press Gazette reported.

Media Wales, the unit which publishes the papers, informed its employees of this restructure plan among its Celtic titles and the decision to put the editorial teams under the immediate control of one editor, BBC News reported.

The four editors currently cover seven titles including the Merthyr Express, Rhymney Valley Express, Gwent Gazette, Pontypridd Observer, Rhondda Leader, Glamorgan Gazette and Cynon Valley Leader.

"Since the introduction of our multimedia newsroom in 2008, we have been working with the weekly titles to produce our Celtic newspaper series in the most effective way possible for our readers and advertisers," said Alan Edmunds, publishing director of Media Wales in a memo to staff. "It is our belief that the future development and operational requirements of these titles as well as the needs of the communities that they engage will be better served by a new approach, taking advantage of the opportunities afforded by our multimedia news operations."

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-28 18:00

The Miami Herald announced Thursday that its parent company would cut 49 jobs, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

Those jobs impacted include seven full-time and two part-time in the Miami Herald newsroom, four full-time and two part-time newsroom positions at its Spanish-language title El Nuevo Herald.

According to publisher David Landsberg in a letter to employees, "These actions come in response to the volatility of the economic recovery, a situation that is affecting many industries." He added that the job elimination is across all divisions through voluntary buyouts and involuntary layoffs, UPI reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-16 22:58

Considering the major shift of readers from traditional news sources to digital media, changes were announced today at Utah's longest publishing daily, Deseret News. The U.S. newspaper will reduce its newsroom staff numbers by nearly half and introduce new strategic initiatives to serve massive audiences globally, TheSaltLakeTribune.com reported today.

Like many other newspapers, Utah's second largest daily faced a difficult choice - to either reduce staff and reinvent itself or to stop publishing. The newspaper chose the former; and despite declining ad revenues, the newspaper's readership showed an increase of 20 percent in 2009, the highest growth rate experienced by any newspaper in the country, according to a blog post by the newspaper's editorial page editor, Jay Evensen.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-31 22:29

Compared to some parts of the world, the U.S. journalism market has experienced a more severe downturn. According to the American Society of News Editors, the country's newsroom workforce grew from about 45,000 in 1978 to more than 55,000 in 1989, but has been in a general state of decline since then. In 2006, the journalism workforce totalled about 55,000, but dropped to less than 50,000 within the next two years, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

According to the Amerian Society for Newspaper Edtiors census for 2009, a total of 5,200 newsroom professional jobs were cut, not as high as the 5,900 in 2008. Online-only newspapers also cut 284 jobs in 2009. This caused newsroom employment to drop to 41,500, from 56,400 in 2000. The percentage of losses are higher at big metros and lower at smaller titles, according to "The State of the News Media 2010," a report by The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.

According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the number of jobs at newspaper publishing companies in the country has plunged from more than 450,000 in July 1990 to about 300,000 in July 2009. The decline began accelerating after 2001.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-02 17:16

Trinity Mirror is to cut 200 editorial staff at its three national titles, including the Daily and Sunday Mirror, and The People, Media Guardian reported.

The company said the cut was due to the creation of new multimedia newsrooms, which emerged from its web-based content management system, ContentWatch. Among all the 200 people being made redundant, 140 of them are full-time.

Photo: Daniel Jones / Alamy

The overall reduction in journalistic jobs across these 3 titles are more than 25 percent, paidContent:UK reported.

This layoff move, which involves reporters, writers, photographers as well as sub-editors and some desk editors, is one of the largest single layoff programmes by any British publishing group.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-11 04:19

The Oklahoman announced yesterday it will cut 57 jobs, blaming the layoffs on the "struggling advertising environment," Editor & Publisher reported.

According to Publisher David Thompson, the layoffs will affect all departments of the paper, including the newsroom. Employees who lose jobs were offered severance packages.

Thompson added that advertising volume is down across all media, and is "in the biggest downturn since the Depression," according to The Associated Press article posted on Google News.

"The Oklahoman's website is seeing an audience increase and that home delivery subscriptions are rising," said Thompson. He mentioned that the digital unit is working on new platforms such as Apple's recent iPad.

This round of layoffs at the paper was about one-third the size of the last in October 2008, E&P reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-06 19:58

Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter has announced that it will cut between 100 and 120 jobs after sustaining multi-million euro losses, The Local reports. This amounts to almost one sixth of the newspaper's workforce.

The company employs 580 people, with half of these in the newsroom. Most of the cuts are expected to affect editorial staff, with more than a third of these set to go. The newspaper reported losses of 97 million kronor, or around €10 million, last year. Despite this, union official Hans Arbman said that the cuts were unexpected.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-08 19:26

Nearly 25 percent of the U.S. newspaper industry's jobs will no longer exist in 2018, according to a new report from the federal Bureau of Labor and Statistics, Editor & Publisher reported today. Of the top 10 industries by job loss, newspapers rank seventh.

As of the end of 2008, there were about 326,000 jobs in newspapers, but by 2018, that number will drop to 245,000, according to the Employment Projections Summary.
However, the prediction isn't surprising, Rick Edmonds, media business analyst at The Poynter Institute told E&P. "That is consistent with what has been happening the past three years. But I don't think the next three years will be as bad."

More than 15,000 people have lost their jobs so far in 2009, with 705 layoffs and buyouts announced so far for December alone, according to industry watcher News Cycle.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-16 19:09

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