Date

Thu - 22.06.2017


iOS

Today, Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to show the world the iPad’s mini me, following (as ever) months of hypothesising and (for once) the competition: Amazon and Google have already achieved success in the tiny tablet market with their Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 devices.

The Apple keynote will take place at 10 am PST in San José, California. “We have a little more to show you,” read the invitations, sent one week ago, seemingly substantiating the speculation that has been ricocheting across the web at least since February, when “the first credible rumour” of a mini iPad came from the Wall Street Journal. Taking place at the California Theatre, the unveiling event will likely be modest relative to Microsoft’s “no-expenses-spared” launch of its Surface tablet in New York, scheduled for Thursday, October 25.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-23 15:53

UPDATED on Tuesday, October 2 at 11:23 am

When it comes to reading news on a small screen, U.S. consumers lean toward web browsers, with 60 percent of tablet-wielding news consumers and 61 percent of those using smartphones now accessing mobile news mostly through the web, according to a survey published today by the Pew Research Centre.

Fewer than half as many mobile news consumers, in contrast, most often use apps; that is, 23 percent of tablet news readers and 28 percent of smartphone readers. A third category, representing 16 percent of those on tablets and 11 percent on smartphones, claims to be more or less evenly split between the two.

An Online Publishers Association survey from June 2012 corroborates the trend: it found that 41 percent of tablet users mostly accessed magazine and newspaper content through the mobile web, 30 percent through single-publication apps, and 22 percent through newsstand apps.

Moreover, this year’s Pew findings follow a pattern established in last summer's survey, by which point the browser was already more popular among news consumers than apps, but to a lesser extent: 40 percent of tablet-using respondents said they used mostly the web browser for news, 21 percent leaned toward apps, and 31 percent claimed to use both equally.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-01 16:04

Time Inc., the largest magazine company in the United States, has stopped resisting Apple. Striking a deal similar to that signed by its major competitors a year ago, the Time Warner-owned publisher agreed on Wednesday to sell subscriptions to all 20 of its titles, which include high-circulation weeklies such as Time, People and Sports Illustrated, through the Newsstand section of Apple’s iOS App Store.

The decision represents a considerable change of heart for a publisher that was “once the magazine industry’s most ardent opponent of selling subscriptions through Apple,” according to Amy Chozick of the New York Times.

Until now, Time Inc.’s readers have only been able to access single issues of the iPad editions of its magazines through the Newsstand app, with print subscribers alone receiving regular automatic uploads.

Time Inc.’s recalcitrance toward Apple since the launch of Newsstand last fall was motivated in part by the hard bargain that the technology giant drives with publishers. Beyond the profit share arrangement whereby Apple demands a contentious 30% commission on subscriptions purchased through its Newsstand, Apple’s previous unwillingness to share the personal information of iOS magazine subscribers with publishers was a deal-breaker for Time Inc.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 13:36

Lekiosk, a French iOS app that offers bundle deals on magazine subscriptions, makes its UK début today.

Michael Philippe, 25, one of the start-up’s quartet of young founders (the company's CEO, Ari Assuied, is the eldest at 33), said in an interview with WAN-IFRA this afternoon that publishers including the BBC, Condé Nast, IPC Media and Dennis had already signed on, giving British consumers an initial 100 titles to choose from, such as Vogue, Wired UK, and Marie Claire. “We’re fairly confident that by the end of the year we’ll have close to 200 titles on the platform,” he said, calling it “a very good start.”

The French app, originally called Lekiosque, has been downloaded half a million times since its launch in January 2011. The idea was born in 2007, while Philippe was still in university. Frustrated by his inability to get his hands on a copy of French magazine Le Point while doing an internship in New York, he called his brother and best friend in Paris, and they came up with the idea of reproducing a French newsstand anywhere in the world.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-11 17:48

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