Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


hearst

As Eastman Kodak files for bankruptcy protection today, the once-powerful company's demise has been largely blamed on its failure to adapt to the digital era.

With this warning ringing in their ears, it seems more urgent than ever now for publishers to make sure that they are doing everything possible to gain digital expertise.

The Hearst Corporation has already made a move in this direction by hiring Philip R. Wiser as its first-ever chief technology officer. Wiser, who will start his new role on February 1, was CTO of Sony Corporation of America from 2004 to 2006 and co-founded Sezmi Corporation, a company that offers broadband, mobile and cable providers with a platform for delivering personalized video content. Wiser served as chairman and president of Sezmi, before its recent sale to KIT digital for $27 million.

Earlier in his career Wiser founded Liquid Audio, an early music distribution platform and served as CTO before Microsoft bought up several of its digital rights management patents for $7 million.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-19 17:44

In their effort to modernize Hearst Corp.'s media assets, executives need only look to their headquarters for inspiration. A fixture of the Manhattan skyline since 2006, the striking, triangular-framed glass tower sits on top of a small, stone building commissioned by William Randolph Hearst 83 years ago.

It serves as a constant reminder for one of the oldest media companies, which is increasingly leaning on the bold and innovative efforts of the start-up ecosystem to overhaul its newspapers, magazines, local television and radio stations for the new digital age.

Continue reading on Venture Capital Dispatch

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-11 11:02

National Magazine Company (NatMag), the UK-based division of publisher Hearst, announced it is transferring its magazine websites to the Magnus publishing platform, which will permit the group to enhance user experience and pave the way for new sources of revenue, Commerce Tuned reported. According to NatMag, the move will urge the sharing of "development and best practices," Brand Republic reported.

The Web platform was launched by Hearst Magazines Digital Media, and combines the publisher's content management, syndication, subscription marketing, community features, universal user registration as well as promotional content, Brand Republic explained. Magnus is also hoped to boost search features and present advertisers with a "technically sophisticated environment in which to engage with their target audiences."

"Our investment in the Magnus platform will create many opportunities for NatMag's websites - from the creation of new revenue streams to providing users with a more efficient and faster service, which, in turn, will help generate significant growth in traffic and attract new advertisers," said Simon Home, NatMag general manager and finance director.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-28 18:06

Hearst Magazines has appointed Sales Executive Avi Zimak (left) as ad director for its tablet operations in time for the October launch of the applications "think tank" called The App Lab, paidContent reported earlier this week. In light of the industry's leap towards tablet-aimed content, the group might also be setting aside an area of Hearst Tower early next year to place iPhone, iPad and other tablet products on display, Web Newser informed.

A recent survey by YouGov discovered that more than half of iPad users in the UK employ the device for reading newspapers and magazines, Telecom Paper stated. According to The Telegraph, TechMarketView Chairman Richard Holway said that he was not surprised by the data, since "the experience of reading a newspaper on an iPad is very natural." Other uses of the iPad featured playing games (50 percent of users), listening to music (40 percent) and reading books (33 percent).

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-23 23:01

U.S. Publisher Hearst Magazines is preparing to open an "App Lab" at its Hearst Tower headquarters in Manhattan, paidContent reported. The lab will serve as a "think tank" for those in the advertising and marketing industries, aiming to to kick-start business associations and help experts discuss mobile content ideas with the publishing industry.

The initiative is set to begin in September, with educational sessions on topics including previews of emerging mobile content, applications and platforms, including iPad and other tablets; advertiser and agency roundtables on new ad formats and models; and consumer insight panels, among other programming, according to the press release posted on WebWire.com. In early 2011, the group plans to open up a physical space for showcasing its iPhone, iPad and tablet products exclusively to consumers.

Image: greenquest.co.uk
"The App Lab is a digital think tank to bring together innovators, both inside Hearst and across the media and technology industries, in order to create the smartest content, ad models and platforms that resonate with consumers today," David Carey, Hearst Magazines' newly named president, stated in the press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-25 19:23

Demand Media has entered into a partnership with Hearst Group to produce content for two of its publications, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Houston Chronicle, Erik Sherman reported last week in a Bnet.com article. The move, in which Demand will create articles and videos for SFGate.com's real estate section and Chron.com's small business section, advances the company's reach into traditional media.

Sherman reported that the normal rate offered by Demand for a few hundred words of outsourced article is US$7.50 to the writer and about $3.50 for copy editing, but Mike Taylor, an author on the MediaBistro Blog reported that Demand actually pays an average of $15 to $20 per article, with price variations depending on the kind of work and level of distribution. Demand pays $30 for videos.

"At Demand's current pay rate, I'd be making almost a buck an hour," The New York Times' David Carr wrote.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-26 21:12

U.S. publishing company Hearst this week will dive into the e-reader game as it unveils its Skiff Reader at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Skiff is a big part of Hearst's efforts to draw back paying readers, and the publisher is expected to tout the e-reader's flexible display and large screen.

Although the actual device is not flexible, the display is, due to a "thin, bendable sheet of stainless steel foil rather than glass-based displays favoured by other e-readers," PC World reported today. The Skiff was designed by LG Display, and although it will not display colour, it does boast a resolution of 1200 by 1600 pixels.

Image: Folio

The device is also is designed to take wear and tear incurred through toting the device around, and the display, measuring 11.5 inches, is the largest on the e-reader market, PC Mag reported.

It is not expected that Hearst will also unveil the Skiff's price at the CES; however, the smaller-screened Nook and Kindle both cost US$259, while the Kindle DX, which has a 9.7-inch screen, sells for nearly $500, PC Mag pointed out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-06 00:04

Hearst Newspapers may be seeing numerous changes next year, according to a message sent out to employees by the firm's president Steve Swartz, Poynter's Romenesko reported last week. In the message, Swartz mentioned digital publishing efforts and the U.S. newspaper publisher's digital content strategy, which will present Web sites that are "much more visual" and contain the "richest possible package of local information and data."

According to Swartz, Hearst will use the group's new Nstein digital content management and distribution system. In addition, they will be launch a paid edition of daily news and entertainment content that will feature "exclusives and higher levels of customization" in addition to free material.
"For too long, these search page views have been going to other sites whose content isn't nearly as rich or credible but who have been better organized for the search engines. Our company has come together with Time Inc., Conde Nast, Meredith and News Corp. to try to set standards for publishing to digital devices and setting payment mechanisms that should make the conversion to digital publishing easier for consumers and advertisers. This initiative, along with our company's efforts to engineer a digital publishing platform, now known as Skiff, promise to put Hearst at the center of our industry's digital transformation," he stated in the message.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-28 19:47

Hearst Corp. apparently tired of waiting for the tech world to produce an electronic delivery software suitable for its many publications. So, it spent the last two years developing Skiff, a platform of its own which is set to start selling in mid-2010, The Wall Street Journal today reported.

"The platforms and devices that other people are building are not really appropriate for newspapers and magazines," Kenneth A. Bronfin, president of Hearst Interactive Media was quoted Thursday by Apple Insider as saying. "We are going to create an entity by publishers for publishers."

Unfortunately, the focus on publishers might be misplaced since it is still up for debate whether readers are willing to pay for news online, much less be locked in to a preset spate of publications available through one particular portal. Hearst has purportedly entered partnerships with other unnamed news sources to be delivered on the application as well. It was not immediately apparent whether the contemplated partnerships were limited to the United States, where Hearst is based, or spanned the globe.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 21:53

U.S. media company Hearst Corp. may have a good reason for choosing an investment banker as its new chief financial officer: it has a US$1 billion "war chest," the New York Post reported, citing "insiders" as sources.

Hiring Mitchell Scherzer as the new CFO signals Chairman and CEO Frank Bennack's "more aggressive acquisition strategy" as he seeks new revenue streams.

Despite the corporation being debt-free, maintaining profitability and revenues of more than $7 billion, Hearst's newspapers have experienced difficulty in the past year. The San Francisco Chronicle was nearly closed earlier this year, while the Seattle Post-Intelligencer switched to online-only. However, Hearst's magazines, which include Cosmopolitan and Good Housekeeping, have fared better than those at Condé Nast or Time Inc.

According to paidContent, Hearst will likely look to buy technology firms over editorial properties. It has already invested in E-Ink and an e-reader with FirstPaper.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-11 21:28

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