Date

Fri - 28.04.2017


Guardian

The Guardian wants to aggregate the web’s best journalism, and it wants your help,” begins Mashable’s Lauren Indvik as she reports on the newspaper’s plans to launch a “pop-up aggregator” today. The way to participate? Tweet great commentary and analysis on trending stories with the hashtag #smarttakes.

A court order has banned the BBC from broadcasting a docu-drama about last year’s London riots, the Guardian reports, and the broadcaster's lawyers are considering making a formal appeal.

The digital news payments kiosk Piano Media through which numerous Slovenian and Slovakian publishers charge for content has announced that seven publishers in Poland (who are together behind 26 national and regional newspapers, 42 websites and 11 magazines) will adopt a joint subscription system in September, Journalism.co.uk and PaidContent report.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-18 18:31

Narcissistic linking disorder (NLD): an ailment whereby mainstream news organisations link more frequently to themselves than to anyone else. And on average, they do – a shocking 91 percent of the time – despite their best philosophical intentions, according to a recent study by Mark Coddington at the University of Texas, Austin. On the other side of the navel-gazing spectrum, independent bloggers link to themselves only 18 percent of the time on average. Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon reports.

The Guardian News and Media, parent company of the Guardian and Observernewspapers, is expected to announce job cuts in the near future, following publishing losses of about £45m in the financial year ending in March 2012, the Telegraph andMediaWeek report.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-17 17:20

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 15:12

The rumours from All Things D have been confirmed. The media and technology network GigaOM has announced that it is buying ContentNext Media, owner of the digital media blog paidContent, from Guardian News & Media for an undisclosed amount.

As part of the deal, a GNM representative will sit on GigaOM's board of directors as an observer, and will become a minority shareholder in the company.

Staci Kramer will continue as editor of paidContent, and executive editor of ContentNext Media, Ernie Sander, will become executive editor of paidContent's and GigaOM's combined online operations. GigaOM's managing editor Nicole Solis has been made vice president of editorial operations.

GNM bought ContentNext in July 2008 in order to build market presence in the US, writes paidContent. However, GNM has been looking for a buyer for the site since last November as it focuses on building up its own US site, guardiannews.com.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-09 14:33

"So... What are you working on?"

Now some Guardian journalists are prepared to give us the answer to that question, as yesterday the paper unrolled Newsdesk live, a blog that promises to "bring you the news as we break it, explain how we choose what we report and why - and ask you to get involved."

This new blog from The Guardian's national news team puts the audience at the heart of the news-writing process, asking them to get in touch via comments, emails or Tweets to provide editors with ideas and information to help create stories.

The blog builds on The Guardian's Open Newslist, launched last October, which published a selection of the stories that journalists were working on, and allowed readers to Tweet at those journalists in real time.

According to a blogpost introducing Newsdesk live, the Open Newslist project "attracted a lot of interest and produced several good ideas within days of starting." Still, the old format was too limited; it was no easy task "using a simple grid and 140 characters to communicate all the complexities of the day's news with an outside audience."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-31 18:00

Are international editions a luxury that newspapers with declining circulation can't afford?

In this digital age, increasingly it looks like international print editions are under threat. An article in The Guardian last Sunday speculated that the International Herald Tribune, the global edition of the New York Times, might be about to shut up shop. Author Peter Preston writes that after selling its stake in the Boston Red Sox and its regional newspaper group, getting rid of the Tribune might be the logical next step for the New York Times.

Preston calls the Tribune "very vulnerable" as senior editors are being called back from the IHT headquarters in Paris to other jobs in New York. He notes that the paper "doesn't make money. It struggles to keep circulation over 200,000 worldwide. And, crucially, it doesn't have a website of its own".

The article is based on conjecture (and it should be pointed out, The Guardian's own circulation was 230,108 in December and it has been losing money for some time) but perhaps Preston raises an important point about the cost of printing international editions. When print production everywhere is under threat, it's no surprise that they're the first to go.


Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-25 12:54

The holiday's over. After being available for free for the past 3 months thanks to a sponsorship deal from Channel 4, The Guardian is set to start charging for its iPad app.

Starting this Friday, current users will be asked to pay £9.99 a month for the app. Not everyone will have to pay right away: new users will be given a seven day trial period before they face any fees, and print subscribers will get the app at no extra cost. But even with these offers, the charge is The Guardian's highest fee for any digital product. The paper's mobile app, by comparison, costs £2.99 for six months, £4.99 for a year and is free in the US.

In an article for Paid Content, Robert Andrews speculates that The Guardian could generate significant revenue if it manages to convert the same proportion of free users into paying subscribers on the iPad and it has done on the iPhone. Andrews writes that The Guardian may be able to convert 47,600 of its current 280,000 active monthly users into paying customers, which would produce £475,000 per month, before Apple takes its 30% cut.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 18:23

Sir Martin Sorrell, the chief executive of marketing group WPP, said governments might need to subsidise newspapers such as the Guardian, if they continue losing money and reach a point that could terminate their businesses, Media Guardian reported.

Sorrell said in an interview with Arabian Business that "governments probably have to decide whether consolidation and media titles going out of business is the right thing from an editorial point of view... The electorate is going to say whether they believe there should be more subsidies for traditional media."

He specified one example of the Guardian, which is currently going through cost-cutting plans to make up for losses. Sorrell said the government may have to consider subsidising the paper or give tax advantages "to people to subsidise it".

"For example, The Guardian newspaper loses money. In the long-term it can't go on losing money. So let us say, hypothetically, that The Guardian could not continue to lose money after a certain period, then you would have to think about whether the government should subsidise it, or whether you give tax advantages to people to subsidise it. There are plenty of ways to skin that particular cow," according to Arabian Business.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-02 23:58

Editor of The Guardian Alan Rusbridger ruled out erecting paywalls around The Guardian's Web site, expressing optimism about the future of the newspaper, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Speaking as part of the Coventry Conversation series, run by the Coventry University journalism department, he said the newspaper had no plans to put up paywalls, as Rupert Murdoch has planned to do for News International titles. "It would be crazy if we were to all jump behind a pay wall and imagine that would solve things," Rusbridger said. He did agree, though, that it was good that journalism was "trying different things."

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-20 20:04

The Guardian has launched a paid-for iPhone application, the paper reported, hoping to develop "the world's best content-based iPhone experience."

Key themes in the development were "speed, customisation, a great design aesthetic and ease of navigation through the full breadth of Guardian content," according to a blog post by mobile product manager Jonathon Moore. The app will refresh content every 15 minutes, and offline browsing will be possible. Content is organised by keyword, and users can customise their home page. As yet there is no video and no option to comment or read comments of others.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 17:54

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