Date

Mon - 20.11.2017


Google

Google is pushing its Chrome Web browser in the United Kingdom, surprisingly, with print ads. Today's edition of free daily Metro hit newsstands this morning in a wraparound Chrome ad, WebProNews reported.

Metro, which has a circulation of 1.3 million each day, is a perfect platform for Google to reach people, a majority of which use Internet Explorer and Firefox - a captive audience on their Monday morning commute, the next Web's Martin Bryant pointed out.

Google is also pushing Chrome on billboards, and seems set on pushing the new browser while ad rates are still low, according to paidContent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 18:38

Italian media group Gruppo Editoriale L'Espresso's chairman has announced his support for daily business newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, which last week ran an article by Google CEO Eric Schmidt. The argument between the press and Google on how much control should be leveraged over content has escalated throughout 2009, and Carlo De Benedetti wrote in an editorial Wednesday that "the problem is that in today's media world there's an obvious imbalance in Google's favour."

Il Sole 24 Ore was right to offer readers Schmidt's point of view, because much of the future of the news depends on the relationship between news content providers and Google, he stated, calling the launch of Google's First Click Free policy "more a diversion than a change of strategy."

"Big G is gearing itself to give every user, everywhere and at all times everything he needs, beginning with the news. In this way, newspapers become only one of Google's many content providers. And since big advertising is linked to other keywords and not to the news, as Google's CEO so aptly explains, who'll pay for the work of editorial and publishing staff?" De Benedetti wrote.

He goes on to state:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-11 23:04

Google Search Appliance, the search hardware used by the online giant, is now able to show tweets along with internal search results, Google announced today.

This real-time information comes thanks to partnerships with Twitter, as well as Facebook, MySpace, FriendFeed, Jaiku and Identi.ca. Yahoo Search, meanwhile, has also expanded space for tweets within its search results, InformationWeek reported today.

"Social information is important for businesses: employees searching for information needed to do their jobs benefit from real-time news too. They might be developing a new breakfast cereal, or designing a marketing plan for a clothing line, or writing strategy report for a political campaign. In all of these cases, understanding what is being said just as Twitter users are saying it can be invaluable," Cyrus Mistry, product manager of Google Enterprise Search stated in a blog post.

The new Twitter function in GSA can be enabled, and then users can choose how Tweets are viewed in their search results; however, financial terms are not yet clear, according to the Washington Post.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-11 00:27

In the category of "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em," the world's most powerful search engine has retooled its approach to content aggregation, possibly avoiding future copyright infringement liability.

Google on Tuesday announced in a blog post by Senior Business Product Manager Josh Cohen that it had adjusted its First Click Free programme, The Associated Press reported Wednesday. The technology change makes it possible for publishers to limit readers to five unpaid page views per day before redirecting them to a subscription form, Google spokesman Chris Gaither told sfnblog Wednesday via e-mail.

The change comes in response to repeated complaints by news publishers that Google searches let potential subscribers circumvent paywalls. Google's answer to date had been for publishers to recode content so that it would be de-indexed. This response was deemed unsatisfactory in that, as Cohen observed during a townhall at the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday, news publishers can hardly afford to be undiscoverable.

The technical problem, as Gaither explained it to sfnblog, was that Google had a strict policy against redirection of readers, which is a mechanism called cloaking often used by unethical Web site owners. Thus, to respect redirection to a subscription form was to permit a form of cloaking, which Google's search engine was previously coded not to do.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 15:42

The senior vice president and chief legal council of Google, Inc. and the CEO of Independent News & Media, plc, today agreed to disagree on the best way to protect content owners' copyrights on the Internet. However, INM's Gavin O'Reilly and Google's David Drummond did tell the audience of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad they would continue meeting in the future to try and solve the issue.

O'Reilly argued that the current Robots Exclusion Protocol, or robots.txt, is outdated, saying publishers "need something more than essentially a binary 'yes/no' for the management and commercial exploitation of our valuable content." The answer, he said, is an updated standard like the Automated Content Access Protocol, an effort backed by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers that seeks to give publishers a better way to control their copyrighted content online.

Drummond, left, discusses copyright protection on the Web with O'Reilly, left. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

ACAP may or may not be the right technical answer for the Web, but if nothing else, it sets up a starting point. It's something that should be welcomed by the content aggregators," O'Reilly said.

Drummond said robots.txt is honoured by all legitimate search engines, and gives publishers tremendous control over how content is shown in searches

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 01:46

The newspaper business model is powerless to compensate for falling print ad revenues, and the problem is not going to go away. The print model cannot and will not migrate to the Internet, where there is a "revenue black hole," in which 76 percent of all online revenues go to Google and Yahoo!, Timothy Balding, co-CEO of WAN-IFRA, told the 62nd World Newspaper Congress today.

"To compete, you will need to retain control of your content. In 2013, combined print and digital revenues will be less than print revenues in 2008," he said, citing data from ZenithOptimedia and PricewaterhouseCoopers. "Should we allow aggregators to build their business on the back of our content?"

Timothy Balding, co-CEO of WAN-IFRA. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

"There are outside forces we can't control," Balding said, referring to a chart of the Dow Jones Industrial Index over the past year that rapidly dropped off.

In terms of digital revenues, only Google posted first-half growth in 2009, he said, and in the third quarter this year, compared to the same time last year, newspaper ad revenues dropped 17 percent.

In the United States, which has been hit particularly hard, of 379 daily titles, circulation between April and December is down 10.6 percent, and digital ad revenues have fallen six quarters in a row. In 2009 in the U.S., estimates by PwC show advertising in newspapers in North America are down by more than 20 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-01 09:46

News Corp.'s Rupert Murdoch is no longer standing alone in the wind as he rails against the unpaid aggregation of content by search engine giant Google, Bloomberg reported yesterday. Publishers A.H. Belo and MediaNews Group may soon shield their content with paywalls, and de-index that paid content from search engines, Editor & Publisher reported.

Publishers resent Google because it does not share with them the money it makes from advertisements displayed next to news search results, Reuters said yesterday. Murdoch's ire goes one step further, seeking direct compensation from search engines for access to News Corp.'s articles, BBC reported yesterday.

The contemplated pullout entails severe risk of invisibility for the publications at issue, MediaBuyerPlanner yesterday observed. Currently, Google enjoys 65 percent of the U.S. search market, leaving Microsoft's Bing only 9.9 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-25 13:10

Google Wave - available only in experimental quantities yet - is already changing the way traditional publishers produce the news, Mashable reported Sunday. Because its interactive structure permits real-time dialogue with readers, Wave has prompted news editors to adjust budget lines to match public interest as it emerges throughout the day.

"It's a lot more live than Twitter because it's like you can see people typing and everybody gets to know each other," RedEye Web editor Stephanie Yiu was quoted as saying. "It's really about connecting with our readers on a new platform. We're learning with our readers and moving forward together."
RedEye is a Chicago Tribune free daily, and its blog describes itself as "print media rebooted and reborn," RedEye states on its Twitter site.

RedEye launched its first public wave on November 10, according to a blog post on that date inviting Google Wave previewers to participate. Apparently, though, other internal waves have been used as well as a forum for assigning stories and developing other content by publications experimenting with the new platform.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-23 16:35

Microsoft recently offered News Corp. an undisclosed sum to make its articles unsearchable by Microsoft's chief competitor: Google, The Financial Times yesterday reported. The rumour comes even as News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has complained that Google shamelessly steals his media company's wares, The New York Times reported yesterday.

Various analysts have observed that newspapers have always been free to shield their products from indexing by Google. Shielding requires coding a no-index label into material published via Internet, like sewing a tag into the neckband of a sweater.

The worry has been whether readers will actively reach for news when it cannot be easily located. Thus, to shut out other search engines in favour of Microsoft's Bing, rather than withdraw from all sites altogether, might help both parties to any contemplated agreement.
The Financial Times further noted in its article that Microsoft's willingness to pay nearly any price to amass Google's share of the search engine market bodes well for the ailing newspaper business.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-23 16:23

Microsoft's new search engine, Bing, kept on growing slowly and its market share was up another half point in October, Business Insider reported.

Bing's market share was up from 9.4 percent in September to 9.9 percent in October, according to comScore.

Compared to the figures in June this year, it has had an 18 percent growth. "That is significant, but not overwhelming," according to Business Insider.

Yahoo, however, lost almost one percentage point from 18.8 percent in September to 18 percent in October, while Google's share was up a little from 64.9 percent to 65.4 percent

The overall search volume rose 13.2 percent in October, although lower than the 17.3 percent growth in September.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-11-17 21:45

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