Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Google

Following Google's announcement last week that it may leave China, the Chinese government has fired back, calling Google's action a "corporate maneuver," paidContent reported.

According to a statement by Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu, "there is no exception for Google" in observing China's laws and shouldering its social responsibilities, China Daily, a state-run publication, reported. "Foreign companies in China should respect the laws and regulations, respect the public interest of Chinese people and China's culture and customs and shoulder due social responsibilities."

However, Google calls China's laws "attempts ... to further limit free speech on the web," David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer of Google, stated in a Google blog post last week.

Ma stated that China's Internet is open, and will keep on creating a favourable investment environment for foreign businesses, including Internet companies, and to protect their legitimate rights.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-19 21:09

Google announced on Tuesday it is rethinking how it does business in China, following the breach of Gmail accounts belonging to Chinese human rights activists. The "highly sophisticated" cyber attacks originated from within China.

"These attacks and the surveillance they have uncovered - combined with the attempts over the past year to further limit free speech on the web - have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China. We have decided we are no longer willing to continue censoring our results on Google.cn, and so over the next few weeks we will be discussing with the Chinese government the basis on which we could operate an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all. We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China," David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer of Google stated in a Google blog post.

China has responded to the announcement saying it welcomes Internet companies as long as they obey laws by censoring their content, Bloomberg reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-14 19:59

Most of Google's news tools are fairly self-explanatory. Fast Flip enables users to flick through different news sources. Living Stories collects all the developments about a single story on a single URL. And of course Google News aggregates news, and has been a source of ongoing conflict between Google and news publishers. But Google Wave notoriously confuses its first time users. There's even a gently mocking Web site dedicated to things that are easier to understand than Google Wave.

First launched as an invitation-only preview, Google Wave is billed as both a conversation and a document. It's a little like email, but also real-time and collaborative. One potential use of the tool is as a platform for collaborative journalism: different participants could add notes, information and images to a story.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-12 17:16

Google News has stopped hosting new Associated Press articles, which implies contract negotiations between the search giant and news service "may have broken down," CNNMoney.com reported today.

As of this posting, a search for the AP as a news source does not bring up any articles dated after Dec. 23, 2009; however, AP stories licensed by other news sites do appear. The licensing agreement between the AP and Google is "believed" to be up for renewal at the end of this month, but AP is not withholding its content, TechCrunch reported.

"... older AP content from before Christmas continues to be available on Google News. If the AP were no longer licensing its articles to Google, those older articles likely would also no longer be available," TechCrunch's Erick Schonfeld wrote today. "[Google] is showing the AP in a very visible way what will happen if Google News no longer carries AP stories, and they are doing this before the negotiations are up so that the AP can measure the loss in readership that Google News brings."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-11 22:33

On Tuesday technology giant Apple acquired mobile advertising company Quattro Wireless for almost US$300 million, "according to a person briefed in the deal," The New York Times reported. The venture is expected to spark more competition between Apple and Google, which recently acquired mobile ad firm AdMob, itself Quattro's rival.

Analysts say Apple may be more interested in apps than ads, making the iPhone the best device for applications to be built for, rather than focusing on ad revenue, The Times pointed out. Piper Jaffray Senior Research Analyst Gene Munster told The Times that 80 percent of three billion downloads from Apple's App Store are free and that an opportunity to sell ads may aid developers in making money.

According to Agence France-Presse, Ex-Quattro Wireless Chief Executive Andy Miller, now Apple Vice President for Mobile Advertising, said the mobile ad firm was "focused on delivering more engaging and useful ads to mobile devices, and improving the measurement and execution of digital campaigns."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-06 17:24

Google today revealed its new mobile phone, the Nexus One, the launch of which Wired pointed out is a shift from the online giant's "original stance as a neutral distributor" of the Android mobile operating system, which could be used on different handsets and via different mobile carriers. With the launch of Nexus One, Google is now "competing with the very manufacturers that use its OS."

In the United States, the Nexus One will run on T-Mobile, a unit of Deutsche Telekom AG, which will be the first mobile carrier to offer a plan for it; however, consumers will be able to buy it directly via a Google Web site. In the spring, Verizon Wireless will also offer a plan, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Image: via Google

The pricetag on an unlocked Nexus One is a steep US$530, and once a phone is purchased, Google is in the position "to control [the purchaser's] relationships with network carriers," according to Wired.

However, customers can also pay $180 for the phone if they sign a two-year contract with T-Mobile.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-06 00:42

Google's Nexus One smartphone will be revealed on Tuesday at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California, the Times Online reported yesterday. The project may help boost the company's presence within the mobile sphere as well as offer direct competition to Apple's iPhone.

"With the launch of the first Android-powered device just over a year ago, we've seen how a powerful, open platform can spur mobile product innovation. And this is just the beginning of what's possible," the invitation AFP and others received stated.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-04 13:56

Google may be launching its Chrome OS-based netbook by the holiday season in 2010, IBTimes reported Sunday. The search engine company has already contacted numerous hardware manufacturers and sent out RFPs (Request for Proposal), according to the report. The device is predicted to cost under US$300 (€210) and will be sold directly by Google.

According to The Link, using Chrome for netbooks means building an open-source OS (Operating System) that will permit developers to build directly on top of the system and drop the licensing fee that Microsoft entails, thus making the netbooks 10 percent less expensive. The project may take away from the significant share of the OS market that Microsoft has. IBTimes added that the netbook is rumoured to have "pre-installed" Google apps like Google Maps, Gmail, Google Docs, Google Calendar and Google Search by Voice. Physical features are also believed to include a chipset from Nvidia's Tegra line, an ARM CPU, 10.1 inch TFT HD-ready multi-touch display, 64GB SSD, 2GB RAM, WiFi, 3G, Bluetooth, Ethernet port, USB ports, webcam, 3.5mm audio jack, multi-card reader and others.

Chrome OS for netbooks may also transform netbooks into Internet-based machines since the focus will be on Web-based applications, The Link writes. In countries like the United States, the company may team up with network operators to provide the netbook as part of a 3G package, IBTimes speculates.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-30 16:07

Google has been fined €300,000 in damages and ordered to stop digitising books in France, MediaGuardian reported today. The online giant was found to have violated copyright law by scanning books and putting excerpts online, after French publishers challenged the practice.

The La Martiniere group, which publishes Editions du Seuil SAS, asked the Paris court to fine Google €15 million. Joining them in the lawsuit was authors' group SGDL and French publishers' association SNE. Google has said it will appeal the ruling.

"French readers now face the threat of losing access to a significant body of knowledge and falling behind the rest of Internet users," Philippe Colombet, director of development for Google Books in France, told Bloomberg in an e-mailed statement. "Displaying a limited number of short extracts from books complies with copyright legislation both in France and the U.S. - and improves access to books."

However, the court stated that Google had indeed "violated author copyright laws by fully reproducing and making accessible on the site" books owned by Editions du Seuil without the publisher's permission.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-18 23:44

During the last quarter of 2008, Google was the most popular mobile Web site in Italy, Spain, Germany and France, according to the Nielsen Company.

It had a unique audience of more than three million in Italy, or 6.9 percent of total mobile subscribers, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

In France, it reached about 2.4 million unique visitors, or 5.6 percent. In Germany and Spain, the reach was less than 5 percent.

In the United Kingdom, however, the BBC was the most popular mobile online site, with nearly 3.4 million uniques, a reach of more than 7 percent. Google was ranked second, with 2.7 million unique visitors, or 5.7 percent.

Other names appearing on the list across these countries included MSN/Windows Live and Yahoo!, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-18 19:50

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