Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Google

On Monday, Google officially removed its search site from Chinese servers, submerging the country in a partial Google blackout much sooner than expected

The company still hosts some Google services, such as Google Docs and Google News, in China, but it has moved its search operations off the mainland to Hong Kong. Because of China's "One Country, Two Systems" policy, Hong Kong has many of its own laws, which don't include the censorship requirements that the Beijing government has imposed upon Google. When Chinese users on the mainland attempt to go to Google.cn, they are directed to Google.co.hk, which aims to bypass those requirements. and drawing both outrage and praise for the act.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-24 19:23

Google may may pull out China on April 10, and could announce its exit strategy as early as Monday, Telegraph.co.uk reported today. The dates originate from reports by China Business News, Bloomberg reported, which cite an unidentified Chinese sales agent for the company. However, Google has not confirmed the information, and a Google spokeswoman from Japan declined to comment.

The search giant has told employees in China that they could move to the company's U.S. headquarters or other offices in the Asia-Pacific region, according to the Telegraph.

In January, Google announced it was rethinking how businesses was being done in China, following the breach of Gmail accounts belonging to Chinese human rights activists. The "highly sophisticated" cyber attacks originated from within China.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-19 18:26

Remarkably, over this past week search giant Google was surpassed by social networking site Facebook as most visited website online in the US, with only 7.03 percent of all website visits to Facebook's 7.07 percent, according to an analysis done by Hitwise. The difference in visits, albeit small, is telling, as it reflects the growing tendency of internet users to look to their friends rather than search engines for online media.

Facebook does come in as the fourth source for visits to specifically news and media websites, behind the main Google search site, Yahoo, and MSN. But when compared to smaller search sites Google News and Google Reader, which direct 1.39 and .01 percent respectively of all upstream visitors to news and media websites, Facebook has a clear lead in providing 3.52 percent of all visits.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-17 03:35

Aggregators such a Google are often accused of making life more than a little difficult for newspapers - yet the company has spoken out once again, offering advice for newspapers struggling against the ubiquity of online news:

In an article by Mercedes Bunz from The Guardian's Digital Content Blog, Google stated that the "key" to newspaper's survival online is "engagement". The statement, issued by Google's Hal Varian, places emphasis on the importance of offering readers interactive experiences but provided little information on specific steps publications should take to go about doing this.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 22:22

Google's next move in the online advertising business will be to charge premium prices from brand advertisers for "above the fold" ads, making display the search giant's "next billion dollar business," CEO Eric Schmidt said, paidContent reported.

Premium, "above the fold" ad placements will be aimed at top marketers, who will be able to bid against one another for the units that will be placed in the top half of users' screens. Previously, advertisers have not been able to select where ads will show up.

"In contrast to cost-per-click ad buys, which is about connecting to users by starting conversations, advertisers buying according to CPMs mainly want to get their ads in front of the right users immediately," Brand Bender, product management director of Google, told paidContent last week.

According to a Google AdWords blog post:

"Two types of advertisers run campaigns across the Google Content Network. The first group, direct response advertisers, measures the success of their campaigns by looking for clicks, traffic to their sites, and sales. In contrast, brand advertisers typically use display ads to raise awareness and purchase consideration for a product or service a person might buy down the road. Other advertisers are looking to achieve a combination of these goals...

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-08 14:53

Google last month took a page from Twitter's playbook, testing its trending topics concept and launching Google Buzz. Now it's Twitter's turn. All Things Digital's Peter Kafka reveals that Twitter's new ad platform looks a lot like Google's.

Although plans are still in the works, it is expected that ads will be linked to Twitter searches, and will also use Twitter's format. The micro-blogging service will work with ad buyers and agencies at first, with the aim to grow into the self-service model like Google, according to Kafka.

Sky News, meanwhile, reported that the ads will be delivered according to users' "feeds and needs." The search-related model is enabled by deep packet inspection, which scans searches for keywords, and then delivers keyword-related ads.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-03 00:23

In an effort to maximise revenue on display ads for online publishers, Google this week announced the launch of an upgraded and rebranded ad-serving platform, DoubleClick for Publishers (DFP), TechCrunch reported.

Google plans to consolidate all its ad serving products for display ads under the DoubleClick banner, by transforming the former Google Ad Manager into a "feeder system" for DoubleClick for Publishers (formerly called DART). Along with rebranding, the DoubleClick platform also has features, including a new dashboard to manage the ads served on a publisher's Web site, improved ad-serving algorithms, and a new set of APIs.

"Google wants to help online publishers make the most money possible from their content. The upgraded DFP is part of our suite of products that are designed to help online publishers maximize their advertising revenues. Ad serving is the machinery that powers the online advertising world, so improving that technology can put a lot of money in publishers' pockets. This upgraded platform is another major milestone in our continuing investment in the display advertising ecosystem," Neal Mohan, vice president of product management at Google said in a press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-26 19:29

Search engine corporation Google has donated over US$ 2 million to the Wikimedia Foundation, a move that may reinforce the "symbiotic relationship" between Google and Wikipedia, according to Business Week. The total donations the free online encyclopaedia raised added up to US$10.6 million for its fiscal year ending in June, a 20 percent spike since the same time the previous year, wrote the Inquirer on Thursday.

There is speculation regarding why Google prefers Wikipedia to other sites, according to Business Week. One proposed explanation is that Google is Wikipedia's advertising partner.

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales approximated that Wikipedia receives between 60 to 70 percent of its traffic from Google searches. Pages from the encyclopaedia show up relatively high in searches because Wikipedia has a significant amount of high-quality content that bring about lots of linking and subsequently gets ranked highly thanks to Google's PageRank technology.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-22 13:14

Google is open sourcing its news experiment Living Stories, the online news format the search giant announced in December. The opening up is a "next step towards better relations with news publishers," Media Guardian's Mercedes Bunz wrote Wednesday.

Living Stories was developed with the Washington Post and The New York Times. The format shows a summary of recent developments relating to the topic, together with a timeline on a single page.

Until now, Google has only had a part in journalism through sending traffic to news sites. "With Living Stories, Google tries to play a further part in transforming journalism into the digital era," according to Bunz.

On average, users spend nine minutes on each story, and most of them prefer the Living Stories format to traditional online news articles, a Google spokesman said, according to paidContent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-19 15:20

Google will no longer target ads on a query-by-query basis, and will instead use hours of search history to target ads to users when they use search keywords, the search giant announced in a blog post Wednesday. This means Google will store each query in order to display targeted ads related to that keyword hours later, on the search page or a site that uses Google ads.

"We've recently started to expand the use of the query words in referral URLs to a few hours so we can so we can continue to deliver more relevant ads," the blog post stated. "After a short period of time (a few hours) the query words are no longer used for the purposes of matching ads. Of course, users can continue to opt out of our advertising cookie at any time here."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-13 00:19

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