Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Google

Google is building a paid content system, and has been reaching out to publishers to find out how willing they are to try out the service, called Newspass, La Repubblica reported Thursday.

The platform is already being tested, and would allow users to buy access to content with just one click, while publishers would be able to use the same infrastructure for all platforms - PCs, mobile and tablet, according to the report, which Google would not confirm.

Under the system, users would be able to input their details, such as a credit card number, and when searching the Web, paid content results would appear, with an icon showing the content to be paid. Users could then select to pay for the content, and be billed automatically, according to the Italian newspaper's report.

Google seems to be changing its identity once again: "from research tool to the bank and passport of the Web," the report stated.

Marketing Week notes that Google has been pushing to work with publishers in the paid online content realm for some time, last year sending a document to the Newspaper Association of America in response to the organisation's request for paid content proposals.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-21 13:06

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission is planning to look into Apple Inc.'s tactics in the mobile advertising market, and decide whether the company's actions will result in less competition in the growing market, Bloomberg reported Friday.

This week, Apple banned mobile ad networks from collecting information, such as location, to give more highly targeted advertising, according to paidContent. Apple bought mobile advertising platform Quattro Wireless in January, after the company found itself increasingly competing with Google in the mobile market. Last November, Google announced it would buy AdMob, which competes with Quattro.

The regulatory body is concerned that the conditions "Apple was placing on software developers and advertisers for the company's iAd program," according to Bloomberg. The investigation is affecting Google as well, as they have caused the FTC last month to postpone a decision on whether to approve Google's buyout of AdMob for US$750 million.

"The terms hurt both large and small developers by severely limiting their choice of how best to make money. And because advertising funds a huge number of free and low cost apps, these terms are bad for consumers as well," AdMob CEO Omar Hamoui wrote in a blog post, according to paidContent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-16 00:42

Google will likely be making a bigger effort in social media and social networking as a way to up its display advertising business, PC World reported yesterday.

"Social signals will be very relevant [to display ad sales] because the more signals you have about the ads, the better the ad will be targeted," said Henrique De Castro, Google's vice president of Global Media and Platforms, at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Technology Conference in New York, according to PC world. "So we're connecting more and more social networking or social indicator signals into our ad delivery."

Yesterday Google also announced it bought Invite Media, a bidding exchange for display advertising.

In its Doubleclick blog, Google stated that Invite "has developed technology that enables advertisers and agencies to use 'real time bidding' to buy display ad space, and to optimize display ad campaigns, across multiple advertising exchanges, all in a single interface."

The post, by Neal Mohan, vice president of product management, also stated that:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-04 19:48

Yahoo lost share in the ad-serving market from 9.7 percent at the end of 2008 to 4.39 percent, according to the latest report from Attributor, Media Post reported.

Yahoo, although still outranking MSN and ValueClick, has fallen behind AOL and Revenue Science, which own 7.15 percent and 6.83 percent of the market, respectively.

The market leaders still go to Google and DoubleClick, with a combined 65 percent share.

Compared to last survey conducted in December 2008, the combined share of Google and DoubleClick has increased by about 9 percent, while Yahoo's dropped by more than 5 percent, or even half of its previous share, according to Attributor.

Among smaller sites with less than 1 million views, Google is the sole dominator, although it shares almost the same market share with DoubleClick on the larger sites.

According to the report, AOL gained market share partly because it acquired Adtech, which is strong on European Web sites, including Sky Network sites like Sky.com and SkySports.com, Media Post reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-12 23:05

James Fallows of the Atlantic took a look at ways in which Google is saving rather than killing the news business, writing that he is "convinced that there is a larger vision for news coming out of Google." He interviewed several Google staff for his in-depth, detailed article.

"Google's efforts to shore up news organizations are extensive and have recently become intense but are not guaranteed to succeed," wrote Fallows. He believes that Google has "undersold" its efforts in its strategy toward news companies, and that people at the top of the company have pushed hard for saving the news industry to "become an internalized part of the culture in what is arguably the world's most important media organization."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-12 22:03

Google's position as a top news site traffic driver has put editors between a rock and a hard place -- should they take the leap to remove their content from Google and risk losing readers? Or should they allow the company to financially benefit from content it did not generate?

Writing for paidContent, media and internet consultant Arnon Mishkin offered news publishers a reality check: "Google is much less important than you think."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-23 22:09

Senior government officials from 10 countries are asking Google to increase privacy controls. In a letter to CEO Eric Schmidt, officials are asking the online giant to protect users as it introduces a growing number of products, the Guardian reported yesterday.

People around the world are "being forgotten," the letter states. "It is unacceptable to roll out a product that unilaterally renders personal information public, with the intention of repairing problems later as they arise," such as the situation that arose when Google Buzz was launched. "We call on you ... to incorporate fundamental privacy principles directly into the design of your new services."

The initiative was begun by Canadian privacy commissioner Jennifer Stoddart, and also includes leaders from France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and the United Kingdom, together representing 375 million people, according to The National Business Review of New Zealand.

"The launch of Google Buzz was commercial experimentation on New Zealanders and other internet users, involving the release of significant personal information. We think people deserve better," Marie Shroff, New Zealand's privacy commissioner, told the NBR.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-21 19:22

Google Inc announced a 23 percent revenue increase in 1Q on a rebound in online advertising. However, its stock price fell 5 percent to US$565.50 on Thursday, after a 5 percent growth since Monday. It looks like there's still a long way for the company to go before it sees its stock prices return to pre-recession levels, The Associated Press reported in an article posted by the Washington Post.

"They've had a strong last few days ... and some investors expected Google to beat by a wider margin and price-per-click to come in a bit higher than 7 percent growth," Edward Jones analyst Andrew Miedler said.

Photo: AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

"They just weren't good enough," said Capital Advisors Vice President Channing Smith, Reuters reported.

Google is trying to maintain its rapid pace of growth, but analysts points out some challenges including the growing regulatory and legal headaches around the world, and its withdrawal from China.

Facing the growing competition from Apple Inc. in the mobile advertising market and people's concerns on its relative lack of success outside search, Google has pledged to keep investing heavily.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-16 21:19

The American Society of Media Photographers has filed a lawsuit against Google over its Book Search, which aims to make a digital library of scanned books, The Register reported today. The service is also being sued by American authors and publishers.

The photographers' trade association states in the suit that Google is illegally scanning and displaying millions of books without getting approval from those who control the rights to photos and other artwork within the titles. The lawsuit is seeking compensation from Google, and is similar to the lawsuit brought by writers over the same issue.

"If there is going to be a system developed to manage the compensation for these types of books, we felt visual artists need to be represented," Eugene Mopsik, the executive director of the ASMP, told Wired in an interview. "We have been totally excluded. We want a seat at the table."

However, the Author's Guild and other publishing groups have agreed to allow Google to scan their books, sell them online and allow them to be included in search, according to Wired. Those that hold rights to the content get 67 percent of the profits, and Google gets the remaining 33 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-09 04:10

In March 2009, more than 149.4 million unique users viewed 14.47 billion online videos in the United States, according to comScore Video Metrix. Each viewer watched 96.8 videos on average. More than 5.9 billion videos were viewed by over 100 million unique viewers at Google sites, which includes top video sharing brand YouTube. Google sites alone accounted for 40 percent of total videos viewed, and each viewer watched 59 videos on average on Google sites, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Other online video properties on the list included Fox Interactive Media, Hulu, Yahoo! sites, and others. However, they only owned a very small share of videos compared to Google sites, as well as average videos per viewer.

In the United Kingdom, total online video unique viewers accounted for 26.8 million in January 2008, and were up to 29.6 million one year later, which increased 10 percent.

Google sites were also on top in the United Kingdom, with 20.7 million unique viewers in January 2008 and 23.7 million one year later, up 14 percent. Its YouTube property contributed the majority of the viewers, with 20 million in January 2008 and 23.5 million in January 2009, up 17 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-06 03:11

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