Date

Fri - 17.11.2017


Google

Google is inviting users to "See where your friends are in real time!" by expanding its Maps for Mobile and iGoogle to allow location-sharing, a new functionalty called Google Latitude. Users can decide if they want to share their location information with a select group of friends, and can then be tracked as their pictures are displayed with location information on a map.

Although users can select privacy controls, "the idea of adding one's minute-by-minute whereabouts to Google's vast storehouse of knowledge still has a certain creep factor," TechNewsWorld's Erika Morphy wrote Tuesday.

According to Google, users can share their locations when both parties agree to the sharing. Users can also share, set or hide their locations while using Google Latitude, and can also choose to turn off the service or only share locations by city-level, rather than down to exact address level.

Using Latitude can be done by either downloading Google Maps for mobile with Latitude to their smartphone's mobile browser, or by adding Latitude to their iGoogle homepage.

However, privacy advocates say they are "appalled" by the new function, and children's groups have said government regulators should make sure the system is fully secure, Times Online reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-04 22:40

Before Google Inc. announced a week ago it would drop its Print Ads programme, British start-up firm MediaEquals had "approached" the online giant, wanting to take the project over, The Associated Press reported Monday.

The Print Ads project, to be shuttered by Google Feb. 28, launched in November 2006 with 50 newspaper partners, and has grown to include more than 800 newspapers in the United States. Print Ads Director Spencer Spinnell announced that Google had "hoped that Print Ads would create a new revenue stream for newspapers and produce more relevant advertising for consumers, the product has not created the impact that we - or our partners - wanted."

London-based MediaEquals has created an online automated system for bidding on print advertising space in newspapers and magazines, the AP reported in an article posted by The London Free Press.

Just because Google is closing Print Ads "does not mean that technology cannot deliver the efficiencies that the press industry so desperately needs," MediaEquals stated, according to the AP.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-26 21:49

Google Inc.'s net income in the fourth quarter of 2008 was down 70 percent from the same time in 2007, from US$1.2 billion to $382 million, paidContent reported. However, despite the fall, the earnings still beat analysts' expectations.

Revenues for the quarter were $5.7 billion, up 18 percent from the fourth quarter in 2007.

Revenues from Google Sites added up to $3.81 billion, or 67 percent of revenues for the fourth quarter. Google Network revenues, such as programs like AdSense, made up about 30 percent of revenues, at $1.69 billion. Meanwhile, revenues from outside the United States added up to $2.86 billion, paidContent reported.

The Sacramento Business Journal reported that Google's 2008 profits were at $4.2 billion, even on sales of $21.8 billion, $16.6 billion more than in 2007.

Meanwhile on Friday, technology stocks traded higher at the end of the day mainly due to a rise in Google shares, which were up 6 percent, to close at $324.70, MarketWatch reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-23 22:49

Google will end its Print Ads product beginning Feb. 28, Print Ads Director Spencer Spinnell announced Tuesday.

"While we hoped that Print Ads would create a new revenue stream for newspapers and produce more relevant advertising for consumers, the product has not created the impact that we -- or our partners -- wanted," the announcement stated.

For advertisers who have already booked campaigns, Google will place ads through March 31, according to the announcement, posted on Google Blogs.

The Print Ads programme was launched in November 2006 with 50 newspaper partners, and has since grown to include more than 800 newspapers in the United States.

"We remain dedicated to working with publishers to develop new ways for them to earn money, distribute and aggregate content and attract new readers online. We have teams of people working with hundreds of publishers to find new and creative ways to earn money from engaging online content," Spinnell stated.

He pointed to AdSense, Google News, DoubleClick, Google Maps and YouTube as examples of products Google hopes will continue "innovate" the space "fair and accurate journalism" also occupies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-20 22:39

Search engine giant Google Inc. announced Wednesday that it will shut down three engineering offices and laying off 100 recruiters as a result of the economic slump, the Associated Press reported late Thursday.

The Internet firm also intends to close engineering offices in Austin, Texas; Lulea, Sweden and Trondheim, Norway, affecting 70 people.

"Our strong desire is to keep as many of these 70 engineering employees at Google as possible," said Alan Eustace, Google vice president for engineering and research, according to the AP. "Our long-term goal is not to trim the number of people we have working on engineering projects or reduce our global presence, but create a smaller number of more effective engineering sites."

Google Vice President Laszlo Bock pointed out that his company does not need as many people in the hiring field in light of the current financial crisis. The job cuts announced Wednesday amount to under 1 percent of the firm's total 20,1000 work force. However, Google's "worker-friendly reputation" may be harmed, the AP article stated.

The company reported a government filing last week mentioning "significant" cuts in temporary employees in order to save money. Nearly two months ago Google said it would be minimising contract staff but would keep full-time workers, the AP reported.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-01-17 00:39

Google widened its U.S. usage share of online search in December 2008, up to 72.1 percent of all queries from 65.9 percent in the same period one year ago, according to Hitwise.

Other three key search engine players all lost in the overall share. Yahoo! came in second after a distant gap, with a 17.8 percent share, down from 20.9 percent in December 2007. Microsoft came next with 5.6 percent, down from 7 percent, while Ask.com reported a share of 3.4 percent, down from 4.1 percent, NYTimes reported.

For the entire year of 2008, Google grabbed 69.5 percent of all search queries in the United States. Yahoo! had 19.2 percent, while Microsoft had 5.9 percent and Ask.com had 3.2 percent.

Google's unbeatable leading status among search engine users directly reflects on its dominant position in search advertising, the biggest chunk of online advertising, NYTimes.com reported.

According to a study published by IDC in December, search advertising made up 51 percent of all U.S. Internet ad spending in the third quarter of 2008. Google owned 54 percent of search-ad spending, while Yahoo! had 12.6 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-14 03:20

Google is powerless to help newspapers when it comes to new business model ideas or a new strategy, Google CEO Eric Schmidt told Fortune Magazine in an article out Wednesday.

"I wish I had a brilliant idea, but I don't," Schmidt said. "We're careful at Google with our money. We write large checks when we have a great strategy. And we don't yet have that strategy."

Google suggests newspapers integrate their products more with Google, so that the online giant can "help them better monetize their customer base," Schmidt told Fortune Magazine.

"I don't think our purchasing a newspaper would solve the business problems. It would help solidify the ownership structure, but it doesn't solve the underlying problem in the business. Until we can answer that question we're in this uncomfortable conversation. I think the solution is tighter integration. The term I've been using is 'merge without merging.' The Web allows you to do that, where you can get the Web systems of both organisations fairly well integrated, and you don't have to do it on an exclusive basis," Schmidt said, according to Fortune Magazine.

Schmidt pointed out that the problem is not that there isn't demand for newspapers' products, as the news is always in demand, but that the business model is unable to support the product.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-08 02:30

Search engine giant Google hinted that it may be launching another mobile phone after recently launching the G1 phone through U.S. phone provider T-Mobile, reported CNet Sunday.

The T-Mobile G2 is rumoured to contain a 5-megapixel camera with an automatic focus, a VGA camera for video calls, a Wi-Fi connection and a touch screen. The phones run on Google's Android OS technology.

The G1 phone was launched in October in the United States and costs nearly US$180. It is manufactured by Taiwan-based contract manufacturer HTC.

The G2 will not be exclusive to T-Mobile and may be sold in various countries across the world. It is expected to enter markets by January 26 next year, according to Cell Phone Signal rumours. Boy Genius Report said that the date will be closer to April, CNet reported.

Tags

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2008-12-23 05:00

Internet search, as a long-time key driving force for online ads, could possibly face its "first negative sequential growth" in the first quarter of 2009, according to a Citigroup analyst, Market Watch reported.

That, in turn, "will be a likely drag on Google Inc.'s revenue," Citigroup analyst Mark Mahaney stated in a note to clients Monday.

Search advertising market giant Google could keep a two percent sequential gain in net revenue in the first quarter, said Mahaney, although that "assumption may now be at risk," MarketWatch reported.

The online giant is likely "acutely aware of global economic trends," due to the data retrieved from its search service, said Mahaney.

He noted that searches for the keyword "Downturn" have quintupled recently, MarketWatch reported.

In addition, Google has reduced its cost "significantly," including layoffs of temporary employees, to get through tough times ahead.

According to Mahaney, in the long term, Google is likely to "come out of the current recession with an even firmer lead in the online search market," while rival Microsoft seems "unlikely to seriously challenge Google in search," MarketWatch reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2008-12-11 12:54

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