Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


Google News

As Google News prepares to celebrate its tenth birthday on 22 September, the aggregation site could find that it finally has friends in the world of journalism willing to R.S.V.P.

From the moment the search engine giant launched its news service in 2002, Google News has found itself embroiled in bitter feuds with journalists and news outlets concerned that the internet company would siphon-off readers and make money on the back of ‘stolen’ content.

Using a sophisticated algorithm to ‘harvest’ stories from 4,000 international news sites, the original incarnation of Google News produced a constantly updated index of breaking news headlines from around the world. Today the ‘Googlebot’ aggregates stories from over 50,000 news sources and is frequently the first port of call for readers chasing a particular news item or wanting a global news perspective concentrated in one location. Unveiling the Google News project for the first time, then-Google product manager Marissa Meyer announced: “From the reader perspective, this changes news reading habits, because (usually) you pick a source and pick the story that interests you. With this service, you pick the story that interests you and then pick the source.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-21 17:13

As most media watchers know by now, the industry is going through an unprecedented upheaval, with newspapers in particular being disrupted by the shift to digital and what Om has called the "democracy of distribution" created by real-time social tools like blogs and Twitter, which make anyone into a publisher.

So while news used to be a tightly controlled product from a few mainstream sources, there is now an explosion of content from virtually everywhere -- some of it good and much of it not so good. At Google's recent Zeitgeist symposium, legendary TV newsman Ted Koppel suggested it is somehow Google's duty to fix this problem, and CEO Larry Page seemed to agree. But relying on Google to choose what news we should read is a very slippery slope.

Continue reading on GigaOm

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-04 10:19

In 2007, two years into the launch of the Huffington Post, cofounder Jonah Peretti coined a term for news sites that disguise how little investment actually goes into most of their content: the mullet strategy. Named after a much-mocked hairstyle that's short and neat in front but long and unkempt in back, mullet strategists maintain a spiffy, well-groomed front page they can show to advertisers while serving most of their actual page views on a constellation of low-quality discussion boards, sexed-up celebrity news bits and user- or auto-generated content.

Continue reading on Forbes.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-11 10:37

Last week, Google announced that it had created new metatags for Google News that would help identify original stories and consequently, which publication got the scoop. The initiative aims to tackle the fact that hundreds of articles will often appear based around one story, and seeks to credit original stories with higher rankings in Google News search results. This change in ranking won't happen immediately: Google first wants to gather enough data to test the method's effectiveness.

The two tags are "syndication-source," which publishers should use to indicated the preferred URL for a syndicated article and 'original-source' which should indicate the URL of the first article to report on this story.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 16:12

Business executives in Europe are increasingly getting their news from Internet, according to the latest Business Elite Europe survey from Ipsos MediaCT, Journalism.co.uk reported. And Google News is the most popular destination.

Although 95 percent of the senior business executives read newspapers everyday, 72 percent said they also visit websites on a monthly basis to get information. This represents a 63 percent increase since 2008, MarketingWeek revealed.

"Instead of replacing other media, digital supplements their use of print and television. Europe's business leaders require as much information from as many different sources as possible," director at Ipsos MediaCT James Torr told Journalism.co.uk.

The poll showed that Google News is preferred by 30 percent he 453,353 business executives surveyed, followed by sites of the BBC (22.7 percent), The Financial Times (15.4 percent), CNN (9.6 percent) and Sky News with (9.4 percent).

Among the newspapers, The Wall Street Journal Europe leads the way with 34 percent of readership, even though its website was only visited by 3.8 percent of the businessmen, Media Week informed. The survey included information gathered from 453,353 business executives in 17 European countries.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-21 23:04

Yesterday The Associated Press reported that Google and the AP have updated their licensing deal for online content. Specifics of the arrangement were not released to the public, although there are two main factors in the deal: Google will purchase the AP's content for an undisclosed amount, and the two companies will also collaborate to increase the AP's online revenue. The terms of the contact may not be dramatically different from previous licensing contracts, yet the recent announcement marks a shift in more diplomatic relations between the AP and Google.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-31 16:54

Content farms have come under more criticism for their lower quality articles that are tailored to what people are searching for and produced by low-paid freelancers, as they continue to produce vast amounts of content and dominate online search results with their advanced use of SEO.

Scott Rosenburg, cofounder of Salon, lamented the appearance of an Associated Content article as the top recommendation following one of his Google searches. Looking to find out more about the resignation of Dr Laura Schlessinger from her radio show over a racial slur, he entered 'dr. laura n-word' into Google. The Associated Content story came up first in the Google News results, followed by one from the Washington Post and then one from Media Matters for America, a blog.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-23 19:15

Six French newspapers have come together to create an online newsstand where readers will be able to buy and read their content. The initiative, which will be launched in September, was announced yesterday by France's National Daily Press Union as an alternative to Google News, El Paí­s reported.

However, in an e-mailed statement to SFN from Google's French office, Myriam Boublil, head of communications and public affairs, pointed out that Google does not currently advertise on its French version of Google News. Boublil stated that the company's position is that it welcomes "new attempts to find technologies and business models that will help journalism flourish online. We value quality journalism, which is why we work with news partners around the world to help them attract bigger audiences and generate revenue. That's what Google News is all about, and we're happy to see any new experimentation and innovation in this space."

The content's price on the virtual newsstand will be fixed by each daily and several subscription packages to either individual articles or an entire publication will be offered. "The monetization of the web contents, which has been agreed on by the editorial groups, is the main priority," according to Les Echos.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-22 19:40

Google's latest move in its ongoing campaign to "save the newspaper industry" is the addition of a sophisticated personalisation system across all its Google News sites. As the NYT's Nick Bilton explains, "What if you woke up every morning to find a customized newspaper on your doorstep?"

The system, called "News for you", offers a stream of local, customized and socially edited content. Google's announcement follows a series of free, powerful, new features that the company has been adding to Google News over the last two years. Past upgrades included the ability to digitally flip swiftly through articles from different sources and a quadrupling of its archive of historic news. See the end of this article for a video walk-through of the "News for You" feature-set.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-01 18:15

Google News, which functions primarily through algorithms, recently ran a test where it used live human editors to collect news stories, reports paidContent. This marks a big step for Google News, which at its launch in 2002 bragged "this page was generated entirely by computer algorithms without human editors."

Google maintains that the test was merely an experiment and that the company does not at the moment plan to make human editors a permanent part of the company. Moreover, "editors picks" comes amidst re-design rumours concerning Google. Yet, paidContent notes, it is important to remember that 3 years ago Google made another move away from automatic aggregation, which was pulled last summer.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-14 16:39

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