Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Google Inc.

The European Commission announced that on Tuesday it began investigating anti-trust allegations related to Google's activity, after which the tech giant revealed that it should have been "more transparent" regarding its mechanism of ranking competitor's search engines, The Telegraph informed yesterday.

Image via Geeky Gadgets

Google might just have abused its powerful position by diminishing the ranking of search results from other engines, The Inquirer speculated. There was also the possibility that Google might have asked certain advertisers to sign an exclusivity contract that obliged them not to place any ads from competing outlets. Furthermore, Google might have imposed guidelines on the presence of ad campaigns on competing online advertising platforms, said a press release from the Commission.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-12-02 17:40

Google is getting the first "broad" anti-trust review of its U.S.-related search and advertising initiatives by Texas-based Attorney General Greg Abbott, The Guardian reported Sunday.

According to IT Pro Portal, the probe will evaluate the mechanism behind the search engine giant's Web-ranking system. Google Deputy General Counsel Don Harrison explained in a blog post that the company was "looking forward" to the inquiry because it is "confident that Google operates in the best interests" of the users.

The news comes in light of complaints issued by shopping comparison sites MyTriggers (U.S.) and Foundem (UK) as well as SourceTool (U.S.), an e-commerce site working for businesses, The Associated Press explained last week. Features that are offered by the sites show up on Google searches, but The Guardian mentioned that Google is being accused of deliberately slicing the sites' traffic by lowering their search rankings.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-07 16:09

Google Inc. is planning to start selling e-books this summer via a platform that would give readers the option to download the books onto different types of electronic devices, the company announced today.

The new service, called Google Editions, will offer e-books for sale through the company and through other retailers, McClatchy-Tribune Newspapers reported. It will be "device agnostic," Gabriel Stricker, a Google spokesman, said today.

Photo: Patrick Gage's flickr photostream

The launch of Google Editions may position the online giant to compete in the growing e-book market along with Amazon.com and Apple Inc., the report pointed out.

The Kindle was launched in late 2007 and so far has led the e-book market; however, Amazon does not release sales data for the device. The iPad was released by Apple last month, and reported that it has sold 1 million devices and 1.5 million copies of e-books on its iBookstore service since then.

The Christian Science Monitor reported that Google Editions may launch as early as June.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-04 22:54

Two advocacy groups have urged the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to prohibit Google Inc.'s planned US$750 million acquisition of mobile advertising firm AdMob Inc., BusinessWeek reported yesterday. The Center for Digital Democracy and Consumer Watchdog issued a statement mentioning antitrust concerns and privacy issues that the sale incited, pointing out that it might "substantially lessen competition in the increasingly important mobile advertising market." according to Reuters.

Search giant Google, Inc. intends to improve sales of adverts featured on applications on mobile phones, Reuters reported. The resulting purchase of AdMob is presumed to spawn the biggest mobile advertising company that would occupy 30 percent to 40 percent of the market, Karsten Weide, an analyst from California's Interactive Data Corp., told BusinessWeek.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-29 15:07

Google yesterday launched a project updating articles by The New York Times and the Washington Post as the stories unfold, The Associated Press reported. The project, titled Living Stories, aims to maximise the use of Web technology in the delivery of news by traditional media organisations, according to a Google press release.

"We believe it's just as important to experiment with how news organizations can take advantage of the web to tell stories in new ways -- ways that simply aren't possible offline," said Google engineer Neha Singh on the search engine's official blog, credited to product manager Josh Cohen. Cohen, through Google spokesman Chris Gaither, declined further comment on the project.

No money will reportedly change hands nor will advertising accompany the content, Cohen's blog states.

Nevertheless, it is clear that the task of continually updating news stories entails considerable manpower and expertise in new media -- both of which might be lacking at newspapers gutted by the recent industry collapse.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-09 17:40

Days after media mogul Rupert Murdoch accused Google of copyright infringement, two media lawyers co-authored an editorial in one of Murdoch's U.S. newspapers in defense of such a theory, TechDirt reported Friday.

According to Bruce Sanford and Bruce Brown of Baker Hostetler in Washington, D.C., the world's largest search engine is illegal because it "make[s] and store[s] full copies of texts to power [its] search functions, profit[s] from this material, and at the same time demand[s] that copyright holders opt out if they don't want to be google-able," they wrote in a Wall Street Journal editorial.

Image: Murdoch at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, 2007. Photo from WEF's Flickr.

The lawyers, using last week's book-scanning settlement extension as the timepeg for the opinion piece, characterise Google's defense as analogising its services to that of a library. They reject the legal shield such a premise implies - that of "fair use" - saying search engines earn ad revenue for cataloguing information where libraries do not, rendering the search engines' use inherently unfair.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 20:01

Throughout 2005, the year after Google went public on the NASDAQ, the company commissioned multiple research agencies to run analysis on the importance of Internet search and search advertising in purchasing decisions across a variety of verticals, TechCrunch reported Wednesday.

Part of this research eventually found its way to the Google AdWords product page, which permits newspaper publishers to gain insight into consumer behavior important to advertisers.

For the Beauty vertical, the survey yielded insightful data on which influential information sources [besides Google's search engine] respondents indicated as important to them when purchasing beauty products on the Web.

Topping the list were Print (49%) and TV (46%), closely followed by search engines searches and POS displays in stores (both 43%). Sponsored links in search results was surprisingly low in the list, with 12% of respondents saying it's an important resource for them when buying skin care products, fragrances etc. In February, Google tabled a test project through which it had published print ads for newspapers.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-30 17:29

Google Inc.'s second quarter sales were slower, the search giant reported, at just a 2.9 percent increase from a year earlier, a decline of 6.2 percent from the first economic quarter, Bloomberg reported Friday. The company's ad prices were down and its share price had fallen almost 2.5 percent.

This slowdown is an indicator that the technology industry's economic recovery will likely be slower than analysts expected, according to Bloomberg.

"It's just a reminder that we're not off to the races here -- this is going to take some time," Ben Schachter, an analyst at San Francisco-based Broadpoint AmTech Inc., told Bloomberg. "Intel got a lot of people excited."

Google's largest revenue source, online advertising, is down as businesses attempt to weather the economic crisis. London-based research firm ZenithOptimedia predicted just a 10 percent growth in online advertising for 2009, compared to 22 percent growth last year.

Google Chief Executive Officer Eric Schmidt said it is "too early for us to tell when the recovery materializes."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-17 18:41

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