Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


French-language

Having launched the second phase of its "Mon Journal Offert" (My Free Newspaper) project last week as part of a €600 million government bailout programme, the French Ministry for Culture and Communication is offering readers between the ages of 18 and 24 a free copy of the daily paper of their choice once a week for a year, according to a report by our sister publication, Editors Weblog last week.

The French government is furthering this initiative to encourage its citizens to become loyal newspaper readers by giving away an additional 210,000 free newspaper subscriptions as a part of the state intervention to save the country's news industry, MediaGuardian reported today. In the next three years, the programme is expected to cost more than £13 million (€14.47 million). The scheme had already given away 300,000 subscriptions, according to Editors Weblog.
"Culture minister Frederic Mitterrand, hailing the programme a success, last week said the scheme had expanded to include 62 titles for its second year and had set a target of giving out 210,000 subs," paidContent reported. "Publishers and the taxpayer split the cost of the free subs 50/50; subscribers receive only one copy per week of their chosen title."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-20 18:06

French free dailies Metro and 20 Minutes will be expanding their distribution coverage in France, with new editions to be published beginning Monday, Newspaper Innovation reported yesterday.

Metro will be launching new editions in Metz, Nancy and Toulon, thereby expanding its reach in the country from nine to 12 editions, while 20 Minutes will launch an edition for Montpellier. Metro's new editions make it the country's only free daily available in these cities, with a distribution of more than 20,000 copies each day, according to a statement by the newspaper, Agence France Presse reported. The launch of Toulon edition is expected to further strengthen the newspaper's position in the south, after the successful launch of its Marseille edition in 2002.

Image of Metro: TarifMedia.com

Through these new editions, Metro boosted its presence further in France, now covering 15 cities.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-24 15:28

Rue89, the French pro-am news website launched its first monthly print edition, Rue89 Le Mensuel, last week, that translates as Rue89 the monthly, Journalism.co.uk reported.

While the decision to go from online to print was an editorial and commercial one, according to founder Pierre Haski, this move aims to "replicate in print the spirit of the website: serendipity and an eclectic choice of stories written both by journalists and non-journalists, accompanied with selected comments from our web audience."

The former online-only title will now be available on print as a 100-page, micro format magazine costing €3.90 per issue and €34 for an annual subscription. The magazine will select 10 percent of its online published content that deserve another reading experience and give stories a second life, while creating a new revenue stream from sales and advertising on print.

Having launched in 2007 by a former team of Liberation journalists, this news site secured €1.1 million investment from five new investors in 2008 before closing the news operations of its sister site in Quebec. The launch of this magazine has been self-funded, according to Haski. He said, "The investment is actually quite minimal as content is produced by our team (20 full-time staff and some freelance writers). We're counting first on the website and our community to promote it. There's no massive and costly promotion campaign."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-21 22:24

President and editor Guy Crevier announced today that half of La Presse's eight unions have agreed in principle to changes that would stave a promised closure of North America's largest French-language broadsheet on December 1, The Canadian Press reported yesterday.

The agreement follows Crevier's October 22 plea to employees, republished by Rue Frontenac, to reconsider their bargaining position in the face of the newspaper's financial disclosures made on October 16.

Apparently, the agreement was preceded also by an open editorial titled "Reasonable and responsible offers," in which Crevier underscored the economic context impacting Canadian media, notably facing a drop in advertising revenue, according to Infopresse.

In July, La Presse stopped publishing a Sunday edition as a cost-cutting measure, as La Presse then reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-29 15:29

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