Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


free content

CNN's new iPad app is completely different than the news network's website, because it was designed specifically for the iPad, and isn't meant to be a tablet-version of the website, Kenneth Estenson, the company's senior vice president and general manager of CNN.com, told Poynter.org's Damon Kiesow.

"With a multi-touch interface, there is no rulebook yet," he said. "The iPad is so new. The initial question was, 'What do I want to touch?'" The design centres on high quality images, because people "want to touch imagery more than words," he explained.

Image: Broadsheet view of CNN's iPad app The app is completely ad-supported and free of charge, and CNN has also made its current iPhone app free as well, paidContent reported.

The app has three views: broadsheet, list view (with a continually updated list of stories) and slideshow, which shows the day's top stories. The content also incorporates text articles, video and users' comments.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-16 21:11

The United Kingdom's third largest national daily has launched a free iPad application with multi-touch controls, TechDigest.tv reported today.

Free Daily Metro's iPad app also helps users plan events and entertainment for the week, while providing all the news from the newspaper in a digital format, according to KnowYourMobile.com. The app has been specifically designed to make the most of the tablet's extra screen space, helping to swap pages and browse sections with just a click, and with capabilities to jump from the front page to key stories.

Prior to the launch, Renault was in talks to be the first sponsor, with a five-figure sponsorship deal, NewMediaAge reported June 22.

While it may seem silly to download an iPad edition for a free newspaper, it does help Londoners realise wastage caused by printing free dailies, when digital copies could protect natural resources and keep public transport free from discarded print waste, wrote Gerald Lynch, of TechDigest.tv. It could also save on printing and distribution costs.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-07-06 23:25

Guardian News & Media Group's Open Platform data sharing initiative plans to go live this month, MediaWeek.co.uk reported. The initiative has been in its beta phase since its launch last year.

Staffers at the media house plan to officially launch the Open Platform initiative for its commercial audience, which includes media and creative agencies, on May 20. The platform facilitates customised application development for its commercial partners, while trading statistics and content from the news publisher for free, in return for carrying its advertising.

The venture allows potential partners to access the Guardian's database and download content for free, in a format that can be easily incorporated by other web applications.

Representing a "new area" of development for the advertising world, Adam Freeman, director of consumer media at GN&M told MediaWeek, "I can see major brands investing in it, including financial services, car brands and those which view digital as a core marketing platform." He further pointed out the advantages of the new platform to small and medium publishers, who "want great content" but can't "afford to produce it themselves".

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-14 20:56

Valérie-Anne Bleyen and Leo Van Hove at Vrije Universiteit Brussel conducted a study of 87 newspaper Web sites in nine Western European countries in 2006, 2008 and 2009, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The study categorised the sites into the following groups: free, fee light and fee+. "Fee light" refers to newspaper sites where all the news, columns and archived articles (if available) are free, and where the PDF version is the only paid-for content on the site. "Fee+" on the other hand, refers to sites that offer something other than a PDF against payment.

According to the study, the share of the free news sites across the nine countries increased from 19.5 percent in 2006 to 25.6 percent in 2008. However, in 2009 the growth of free sites seemed to slow, as it only increased slightly to 26.8 percent.

Luxembourg, Spain, Belgium and France are the countries with the biggest growth of free sites. In Luxembourg, the amount of free sites jumped from 33.3 in 2006 and 2008 to 66.7 in 2009. In Spain, the figures boosted from nothing in 2006 to 37.5 percent in 2009.

In Belgium, they grew from 11.1 percent in 2006 to 22.2 percent in 2008. In France, the numbers went up from 9.1 percent in 2006 to 18.2 percent in 2008.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-07 22:31

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free? According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The survey was conducted during the autumn of 2009, covering nations in five geographical regions, including the Asia Pacific region, Europe, Middle East/Africa/Pakistan (MEAP), Latin America and North America.

When asked if free online content should remain free, the majority (85 percent) of all the respondents said they strongly agree or agree, while only a small group expressed their disagreement, according to the Nielsen report "Changing Models: A Global Perspective on Paying for Content Online," released in February 2010.

To break down by region, Latin Americans had the highest percentage of respondents saying they "agree" or "strongly agree," with more than nine out of 10 saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-24 22:08

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