Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Facebook

News Corp.-owned MySpace Thursday announced its plan to buy music recommendation service iLike, in order to rebuild its status as an entertainment portal, Reuters reported.

MySpace refused to disclose financial terms of this deal. However, several blogs, including AllThingsDigital, reported earlier this week that this deal is worth around US$20 million.
iLike is probably best known as a popular social music discovery service on Facebook, which has surpassed MySpace as the top social networking destination.

MySpace led the social networking sector two years ago, but has lost users who have shifted onto Facebook or other sites.

"We think that integration of iLike should help drive stickier traffic and ultimately improve monetization of MySpace user base," according to JP Morgan analyst Imran Khan, Reuters reported.

News Corp. owner Rupert Murdoch has pressed to reinvent MySpace as an entertainment portal, given its existing advantages in areas such as music and movies.

Although it is still among the most popular video and music sites, Nielsen pointed out that time spent by users on MySpace dropped by 31 percent between April 2008 and April 2009, while that on Facebook boosted 700 percent.

According to Owen Van Natta, MySpace Chief Executive on a conference call, iLike's social discovery technology can help MySpace leverage in other areas beyond music, such as entertainment, video and games, Reuters reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-21 17:38

Facebook has recently bought micro-blogging service FriendFeed, reworked its search engine and tested a service called Facebook Lite, which targets users in locations where bandwidth is limited. According to Reuters, the social networking giant's recent activity opens a new chapter in the company's growth.

According to comScore, Facebook is the fourth most visited site in the world, with more than 250 million users as of June. This status opens the doors to create more services that other sites provide - such as search, online payments and digital downloads, to name a few - Haim Mendelson, professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, told Reuters.

The Atlantic's Derek Thompson, whose article calls Facebook's recent moves an "evil, genius plan to own your life," points out that Facebook is in a position to become "the holy grail of online advertising." This means that thanks to the $50 million purchase of FriendFeed, which aggregates friends' online activities, coupled with information gleaned from users' profiles, Facebook can better gauge which sites users visit as well as which ones they like: "a one-stop shop for (a) Web user's complete identity."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-17 22:12

Facebook is preparing a service called "Facebook Lite," to target countries where bandwidth is limited, according to The Guardian.

Many expect the service to be a clone of Twitter, but it's actually a "stripped-down version of Facebook."

It is also aimed at mobile markets, such as Asia, the fastest-growing region for Facebook.

According to TechCrunch, Facebook is presently testing this service in India, and plans to launch it in Russia and China.

It is "a faster, simpler version," and "similar to the Facebook experience you get on your mobile phones," according to the company's response to TechCrunch. Like its original version, "Facebook Lite" enables users to make comments, accept requests, write on walls, and check on photos and status updates, The Guardian reported.

With its main servers located in the United States, the company is looking for some ways to better serve its users in the fastest growth markets where the connection speeds are lower. Smaller pictures and lower-resolution videos will be used in the Lite version in order to save on pages' downloading time.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-12 22:10

Johnston Press has blocked the use of Facebook for employees of its titles Holdthefrontpage.com reported.

Despite the fact that Johnston Press' own papers have Facebook pages, the company has decided that employees wanting to use the site would have to ask permission from a manager before doing so.

A memo sent to employees said the reason for this decision was due to the fact that "50pc of Johnston Press' outward internet traffic is to the social networking site, Facebook."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-03 12:52

Social Media sites such as Facebook and Twitter are proving to be successful outlets for reporting on events following the presidential election in Iran, where news is being heavily restricted and censored by the government, Poynter Online reported.

The microblogging site Twitter has confirmed itself as a particularly valuable resource during recent protests in Iran, so much so that the U.S. government appealed to the networking site, asking it to delay scheduled maintenance in order to keep the site active and updated.

Other social media sites, such as YouTube and Flickr, provide video and photos of the events which are otherwise unlikely to be distributed or published in newspapers given the government's restrictions on the press. The Iranian uprising has also inspired the aggregation of Tweets on a site called WhyWeProtest.net which offers a list of "essential Twitter follows".

Thanks to proxy servers that do not disclose the location of the user, bloggers and other news gatherers are able to access and upload content on sites that have been blocked by the Iranian government. However, government efforts to block the proxies are making online access increasingly more difficult. In response the the heightened censorship, Iranians are asking the international community for aid in creating new proxies which would allow for more reporting.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-18 11:52

The New York Times has named Jennifer Preston as its new "social media" editor, the AFP reported.

An internal memo issued by the Times detailed Preston's duties, including "expanding the use of social media networks and publishing platforms to improve New York Times journalism and deliver it to readers."

The memo also said that Preston would be working with the paper's staff in order to train them in using social media resources "to find sources, track trends, and break news as well as gather it."

Social Media sites mentioned in the memo included Twiter, Facebook, and Flickr.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 08:48

While the UK Evening Standard celebrated its new design by giving away 650,000 free papers, the free daily thelondonpaper relaunched its Web site, Brand Republic reported.

The updated site is more interactive, giving users options to leave comments or reviews. The site also includes a connection to Facebook, which streams users' inputs to the site through a Facebook newsfeed. Changes were made after "extensive consumer research," and will also benefit advertisers, said Stefano Hatfield, editor of thelondonpaper.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-13 14:03

Social networking site Facebook is planning to implement an experimental micropayment system on its site in the coming weeks, paidContent reported.

Reports say the payments would be required to use Facebook applications, and the payees' information would be stored on the site for further use once they are entered. Facebook has yet to confirm or give details on the micropayment plan.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-12 13:46

MTV plans to share ad revenue with social networking sites Facebook and Twitter when it integrates content from the sites into its new show, "What You're Watching With Alexa Chung," paidContent reported.

The revenue split marks a first for both social media networks, whose platforms are often used in marketing schemes, but until now, have not received compensation for the services, and extensive market, they provide.

MTV, whose audience consists mostly of 12-to 24-year-olds, plans on airing live Facebook updates and Tweets throughout the show. If the marketing plan proves a success, it could signal a new revenue-generating model for the sites, which have yet to find a functional way to make a profit off of their content, according to paidContent.

Sean Moran, head of ad sales at MTV, said the new show is a "joint venture" with Facebook and Twitter, AdAge reported. Ad sales deals are being negotiated, and are expected to lead to revenue sharing between MTV and the social networking sites, he said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-06 13:00

A recent study conducted by the Interactive Advertising Bureau shows that users of social networking sites are annoyed by constant group and application requests Media Guardian reported.

The IAB's study reported that 31 percent of users of sites such as MySpace and Facebook express discontent with the onslaught of updates and appeals to join groups. These findings shed light on users' sensitivity to, and dislike of, networking sites being used for marketing purposes.

Out of all the participants in the study, only 5 percent said they had added a "friend" or profile that was brand-sponsored. Twelve percent of respondents expressed an unfavorable opinion of the monitoring of their activity by other users, Media Guardian reported.

Overall, 28 percent of people surveyed said they would add a new group if it offered "exclusive content," the report stated.

IAB senior marketing manager Amy Keane said that the study concluded that "respect for the user is just as important in social media, users will not respond to spam or irrelevant advertising."

The study also produced numbers reflecting the popularity of social networking sites in the UK, where 58 percent of all Internet users have a profile on a networking site, of which 14 percent have profiles on three or more sites, Media Guardian reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-21 20:20

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