Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Facebook

Facebook Inc. and Groupon Inc. investor Mail.ru Group Ltd. Has filed a US$876 million IPO to go public on the London Stock Exchange, Bloomberg reported today.

The Russian Internet group is publishing for a valuation of up to $5.7 billion, the Wall Street Journal noted. It is looking to sell 3.03 million new shares and 28.59 million existing shares in the form of global depositary receipts at between $23.70 and $27.70 per GDR. If it's successful, the IPO will be the largest in the United Kingdom since July, when mining fund Vallar Plc raised $1 billion. Mail.ru could raise up to $83.1 million, and the company's owners could make up to $792 million from selling their stake in the IPO.

However, the valuation looks to be "too high" - more expensive than Internet companies anywhere but China, analysts told the WSJ.

"Such a valuation must assume significant growth of all the assets and the additional value from the synergies between them," Andrey Bogdanov, analyst at Gazprombank, told Reuters.

The Moscow-based Mail.ru owns 2.4 percent of Facebook, 5.1 percent of Groupon and 1.5 percent of Zynga Game Network, according to Bloomberg.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-26 16:16

"Need a break? So does the rainforest."

This was the message behind Greenpeace's social media campaign last March against Swiss chocolate giant, Nestlé. The environmental organisation criticised Nestlé for using palm oil suppliers that allegedly destroy Indonesian rainforests and threaten the Orangutan habitat.

Just days after posting a one-minute commercial parody on YouTube featuring an office worker taking a break with a Kit Kat bar made of orangutan fingers, Greenpeace and hundreds of thousands of people across the globe watched the video go viral. They also watched Nestlé's reputation take a beating.

The company, largely unprepared for the ensuing social media PR battle, was "wall bombed" with complaints on its Facebook page. Nestlé asked YouTube to remove the video due to copyright, and even tried to censor the negative comments on its Facebook page. But outgunned by critics, Nestlé's moderator later issued an apology stating: "This was one in a series of mistakes for which I would like to apologize. And for being rude. We've stopped deleting posts, and I have stopped being rude."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-21 21:57

HTML 5, the latest version of code used to create websites, is expected to further erode users' privacy, by letting sites know where users are physically located, as well as better track browsing histories. Consumer activists and privacy advocates are certain to be against these privacy threats, but those in the journalism world may find it to be their "salvation," writes The New York Times's Robert Wright.

"The willingness of advertisers to spend the money that sustains journalists has always depended on having information about the reader," he stated. And, as online players get bigger, the power they wield increases as they obtain more user data. Wright points to Google, Yahoo and Facebook as the top examples of firms obtaining more and more user information.

Image: WSJ. Click here for the interactive version.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-20 18:00

Yahoo plans to unveil a new feature called 'Y Connect' this autumn, emulating the Facebook Connect strategy to allow media publishers, Web developers and other websites to integrate elements of their services with Yahoo, the Wall Street Journal reported.

This move by Yahoo is aimed at helping Internet companies track user engagement and better target advertising offers, while increasing traffic to its site - a strategy already used by Facebook, the WSJ pointed out.

With the Internet service company struggling of late to increase traffic on its site and having recently revamped its search feature, "additional traffic is critical at this juncture," Mashable.com reported. The company has also been rumoured to be fighting off an acquisition attempt by AOL.

Through this Y Connect feature, users can register and log into media sites simply by clicking a Yahoo button and sharing their activity on media sites with other contacts on Yahoo. Content on non-Yahoo sites would be shared via Yahoo Pulse, a hub connected to Yahoo Mail accounts, according to the WSJ.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-19 19:12

Having recently crossed the 3 million mark on August 29, location-based startup Foursquare has processed its 4 millionth user registration today, according to a report by the company.

Despite the previous service problems faced by Foursquare earlier this year, the company is now adding close to 20,000 users per day, up significantly from the estimated 15,500 per day rate when it crossed the 3 million mark, Mashable.com reported. "Foursquare's impressive growth can be attributed to a number of things, most notably the release of version 2.0 for iPhone and Android (Android), a Symbian release and celebrity attention from the likes of Conan O'Brien and hip-hop artist Big Boi," Mashable's Jennifer Van Grove explained.

Among other factors that contribute to rapid growth of the startup has been increasing awareness among users in cities around the world and college campuses, along with mentions in mainstream media such as MTV's VMA Awards, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and People magazine, the company noted. Having recently introduced Facebook Places in mid-August, the company has been seeing a very positive growth rate.

The company has lately been battling competition from Gowalla with around 450,000 users in the beginning of September and figures from adoption of Facebook Places is yet to be revealed, according to Mashable.com.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-19 19:06

While many NGOs, non-profits, and news organisations are still baffled and skeptical of the impact new media tools can have, Americas Society is embracing the Web and social media to broadcast news and augment their readership. By engaging with Twitter, Facebook, and Web 2.0 platforms, Americas Society is an example of cultural institutes and policy think tanks coming into the digital realm.

On Sept. 23, hours after news broke that a Colombian military attack had resulted in the death of a Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia leader, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos spoke at an Americas Society event in New York. Live tweeting of Santos' remarks entered the international news stream, and it was announced to the world that not only had the FARC leader, Mono Jojoy, been killed, but 14 computers and 60 USB drives of information about the FARC had also been seized by Colombian authorities.

Santos: "What happened back home in #Colombia with this military success we had 24 hrs ago is going to change our history." (http://twitter.com/ascoa)

Santos went on to compare the significance of Jojoy's death to the Colombian authorities with an announcement to New Yorker's that "Osama bin Laden had been struck down."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-19 00:16

A Facebook news app for users might come about in the near future, but news publishers should be wary of its appearance, believes NewsCloud's Jeff Reifman. He writes on his NewsCloud Blog that as Facebook already lets users share photos, e-mails, events and groups, it seems that "a built-in news application is inevitable." An application like this would help Facebook "take on Google News" and broaden its content. However, Reifman believes a news app for Facebook apparently would not be good for media companies. (It must be noted that Reifman's NewsCloud offers a Facebook application for news organisations and therefore he has a specific interest in this topic.)

For some time, publishers have lost (and gained) page views because readers are finding news from Google News, Twitter and Facebook. "Currently, news bubbles into your Facebook feed in a distributed fashion based on Facebook pages you've joined," states Reifman. Publishers also use Facebook pages "despite concerns about end user privacy, data collection and revenue" and they cannot personalize stories to certain readers through Facebook. However, a Facebook news app could change the way news is delivered to Facebook users.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-18 15:20

CNN's first global research study into the power of news and recommendation (Powar) revealed that 27 percent of Internet users are responsible for sharing 87 percent of news links, MediaGuardian reported today. Each of these frequent users shares and average of 13 stories per week and receives at least 26.

According to the study, social media like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube continue to be the most powerful sharing tools and they are responsible for 43 percent of the articles shared. These sites are closely followed by e-mail (30 percent), SMS 15 (percent) and instant messenger 12 (percent), Journalism.co.uk reported.

Photo source: Virgin Media

At least 65 percent of the shared content is composed by news stories while breaking news and funny articles only represent 19 percent 16 percent, respectively.

Furthermore, CCN's research also found sharing patterns according to the geographic location of users. For instance, Americans share contents that they think could be useful for family and friends and Europeans focus more on stories related with work, The Guardian pointed out.

The study was conducted among 2,300 Internet users between June and August.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-07 22:09

Facebook drives 13 times more traffic to French news sites than Twitter, which only accounts for one click per 100 visits, according to a study conducted by AT Internet Institute, paidContent reported today.

Among the top 12 leading news sites in the country, Facebook is responsible for 1.3 percent of visits and Twitter for 0.1 percent. By way of comparison, researchers also looked at the traffic driven by Google and found that the search engine' share is 40.6 percent or 30 times greater than Facebook, AT Internet explained in a press release.

Graphic source: AT Internet Institute

"This figure remains high, but we should not forget that the main function of a search engine, such as Google, is to suggest links to Internet users. This is not the case for Facebook," the company reminded.

The low impact of Twitter is becoming a trend in some countries. According to paidContent, a study released in March showed that the 140-character site only drives 0.14 percent of the traffic to U.S. news sites.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-29 16:52

According to the head of Gawker Media, Nick Denton, online media need to become more like television, states an article on paidContent.org. "It means a screen which is less constrained by the need to have three or four ads and every single bit of content on one screen," Denton was quoted as saying in the article. paidContent speculated whether Denton was making reference to a future Gawker redesign.

There will always be space for writers, however, even if just to put text around a video. He expressed frustration with blogs, noting that for the Gizmodo iPhone 4 story, "we had to cease publishing for six hours to keep this story at the top of the page." Gawker's goal is to focus more on new media and less on old media. "I always say that our readers are interested in [Mark] Zuckerberg, not [Mort] Zuckerman," the article quotes Denton as saying.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-28 17:21

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