Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


employment

There’s little doubt that learning new digital skills while coping with fewer resources has put newsrooms everywhere under pressure.

The annual Pew report on the state of the American media noted today that, “a number of fourth-quarter announcements of layoffs, wage freezes, furloughs and internal cost-reduction task forces suggests that the intense pressure to do more with less while finding some money for new efforts is probably industry-wide.”

What does this mean for journalists who are being paid significantly less to work longer hours? In the case of one former reporter for the Chicago Tribune’s TribLocal, it has led to legal action. The Chicago Tribune reported at the end of last month that Carolyn Rusin, who was employed as a staff reporter for TribLocal between July 2010 and October 2011, was filing a lawsuit stating that she regularly worked more than 40 hours a week, but was only paid for five hours of overtime in 2011.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-19 18:02

At least 25 percent of Spanish journalists have lost their jobs and 66 percent have seen their paychecks reduced because of the economic crisis, according to 2010 Annual Report of the Journalistic Profession published today by the Press Association of Madrid, Europa Press revealed.

When compared with 2009 results, the report shows an increase in the number of journalists who are not working from 5,155 to 5.564, out of which 66 percent are women, ABC.es informed. Furthermore, the average salary is €30,000 down from €35,000 six months ago.

Image source: russelpikemarketing.com

"The epidemic that is affecting the profession is unprecedented," said the President of the Press Association Fernando Gonzalez Urbaneja, adding there is "a mismatch between the college and the labor market."

The report pointed out that there are 72,292 journalists in Spain but only 30,000 available jobs, PRNoticias revealed. In 2010, 2.906 people graduated from journalism school and over 3,000 are expected to do so in 2011.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-14 23:22

A former editor who was fired from her position at the New York Post in September sued her former employer Monday, claiming her dismissal was discriminatory and stemmed from her complaints surrounding an editorial cartoon that critics said likened U.S. President Barack Obama to a dead chimpanzee, The Associated Press reported Tuesday. Sandra Guzman served as an associate editor at the Post since 2003.

The suit puts the magazine's parent company, media conglomerate News Corp., at the centre of yet another legal controversy this week. The Post maintains Guzman's position was eliminated because " the section she edited was discontinued due to a decline in advertising sales," according to a statement.
Tempo magazine, a monthly insert in the Post, was apparently designed to increase readership by Latinos, which rose 40 percent under Sandra Guzman's leadership, The Courthouse News Service reported yesterday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-12 21:01

French journalists on Tuesday penned an open letter to their nation's president, Nicolas Sarkozy, seeking relief from what they see as an attack on the press industry from all sides, Le Monde yesterday reported.

Calling the situation "extremely troubling," The National Journalists' Union (SNJ, by its initials in French) linked the ongoing economic collapse of traditional news media to the onset of Sarkozy's term of office in May 2007, according to the letter published on the organisation's Web site.

The journalists complain that even free tabloids - which were long hailed the answer to disaffected readers - are operating in the red while paid dailies suffer enormous declines in ad revenues.

In response, the journalists say they cannot be counted on to deliver the news effectively to the public without the government's concession to the following demands:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-06 15:03

Under the banner, "Our precarity is your disinformation," the 600,000 member-journalists in 116 countries of the International Federation of Journalists have declared today to be the International Day in Defense of Journalists, the Madrid Press Association announced Monday on its Web site.

In support of that campaign, Spanish journalists have advised they would "take to the streets" at noon "in defense of media professionals' employment rights" and the public's right to quality, credible news reporting. A journalism school in Catalunya also promised to picket in solidarity at San Jaume Plaza during the same hour.

A further public protest is planned for Thursday, November 11, by the staff of 20 Minutos, a free national tabloid, 233 Grados reported last month. According to PR Noticias, 20 Minutos staff interrupted a management meeting in late October to announce their particular strike and demand the leadership's resignation for failing to generate profits while ignoring staff writers' proposals on doing so.

The tabloid's staff - which stood at 340 a year ago - has been reduced by 140, with more cuts in the online division underway, Press Digital reported in October.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 17:00

The future of one of China's best-selling investigative magazines is at stake in an increasingly public battle for control that pits its envelope-pushing editor against the Chinese government, Reuters reported Tuesday. Caijing magazine, the mainland's most influential and profitable business publication, has experienced a mass exodus of reporters and editors, according to the China Economic Review.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-13 18:42

Two publications owned by the New York Times Co., The Santa Rosa Press Democrat and the affiliated weekly Petaluma Argus Courier, are going to cut payroll by 10 percent next year, in order to "bring costs in line with lower ad sales," said Publisher Bruce Kyse Tuesday.

According to the Santa Rosa paper, the cutbacks could include pay cuts, buyouts, and, if needed, layoffs, said Kyse in a series of meetings with employees.

"Unfortunately, the economic tide is hard to swim against. We are faced with economic realities, and we have to take steps to deal with them," according to Kyse, San Francisco Business Times reported.

Just like other papers nationwide and in the Bay Area, these two papers experienced display and classified advertising slowdown due to the economic slowdown, the online migration of classifieds and other advertising, as well as changing reading habits.

"The cuts will impact union and nonunion workers in all departments at the papers," said Kyse in the Press Democrat story.

The Santa Rosa paper has 325 employees, while the weekly Petaluma Argus Courier has 16.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-06 18:17

The U.S. Justice Department is investigating the hiring practices of technology companies Apple, Google, Yahoo and Genentech, The Washington Post reported June 3.

The companies have been accused of conspiring with each other to prevent other firms from poaching their top staff. Such arrangements are potentially in breach of anti-trust laws.

This is not the first time the Federal Trade Commission has questioned the business practices of these companies, according to a Sacramento Business Journal article. Earlier this year the commission was concerned with the boardroom correlations at the corporations. Google head Eric Schmidt is also a director at Apple Inc., where chief executive officer of Genetech at the time, Art Levinson, also was on the board.

The agreements not to poach staff could breach anti-competition laws if two or more companies formed deals not to pursue the others employees. The hiring practices have been criticised for reducing the opportunities for those company's employees, and practically allows companies to permanently subjugate top staff.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-22 19:51

Journalism students graduating from both Columbia University and CUNY's Graduate School in New York are finding jobs in their field, surprising to many, as many news outlets cut back, Daily Finance reported Thursday.

At Columbia, 64 percent of Graduate School of Journalism students (194 in total) found employment in their field after graduation.

Elizabeth Weinreb Fishman, Columbia University's associate dean of communications, told Daily Finance that the 64 percent recent graduates now employed in the field is actually on the low side, as many students have received job offers in the past couple of weeks, following graduation. She said this is due to the prestigious Columbia name and "the truly prodigious efforts of our career services team."

At CUNY's journalism programme, of the last class to graduate (in December 2008), with 45 students, 60 percent now have full-time jobs in the journalism field, while 15 percent have "quasi-full-time internships or freelance gigs," Stephen B. Shepard, the school's dean, told Daily Finance. He credits this to students learning to practice the trade across all media platforms, which makes them valuable to newsrooms beefing up digital areas.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-12 09:25

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