Date

Thu - 27.07.2017


education

Germany’s international broadcaster Deutsche Walle (DW) is using mobile phones to extend the reach of its "Learning by Ear" programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa. In a continent where Internet access is limited or non-existent, and many countries experience high levels of adult illiteracy, DW has teamed up with mobile phone operators, like Vodaphone in Tanzania, to bring its news service to a greater number of listeners.

Originally a radio series launched in 2008 and followed up with a podcast in 2010, "Learning by Ear" aims to give young people aged 12-20 an insight into subjects like the economy, health, politics and the environment. Through dramas, feature reports and in-depth news analysis "Learning by Ear" tackles issues pertinent to the continent’s teenagers, such as looking and applying for a job in Africa, HIV and AIDS information and a series on women’s rights.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-23 16:52

by Andy Boyle

In case you didn't know, many news organizations are looking to hire web developers to help create awesome stuff online. And as this list of 19 job openings might imply, news organizations are having a difficult time trying to find people to fill these gigs.

One of the reasons for this difficulty, I believe, is because journalism students are not learning the necessary skills during their college years and internships to meet the minimum requirements of these jobs.

Continue reading on andymboyle.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 09:03

The New Revenue and New Channel Innovations study tour will take place from Sunday, 7 November to Friday, 12 November 2010 in Silicon Valley, California, United States.

New revenue development is the hottest topic among media executives today, according to the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project's 2010 World News Future & Change Study. Participants will learn about new revenue and channel opportunities such as:
- online, video and mobile advertising
- paid content online
- audience development and high-yield revenue-making
- new product development, and much more.

We will visit both new media and traditional companies, including: Google, Yahoo!, Hewlett Packard, Stanford University, Nokia, and more.

Visit the study tour sign-up page for more information.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-21 01:19

The New Revenue and New Channel Innovations study tour will take place from Sunday, 7 November to Friday, 12 November 2010 in Silicon Valley, California, United States.

New revenue development is the hottest topic among media executives today, according to the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project's 2010 World News Future & Change Study. Participants will learn about new revenue and channel opportunities such as:
- online, video and mobile advertising
- paid content online
- audience development and high-yield revenue-making
- new product development, and much more.

We will visit both new media and traditional companies, including: Google, Yahoo!, Hewlett Packard, Stanford University, Nokia, and more.

Visit the study tour sign-up page for more information.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-14 22:17

The New Revenue and New Channel Innovations study tour will take place from Sunday, 7 November to Friday, 12 November 2010 in Silicon Valley, California, United States.

New revenue development is the hottest topic among media executives today, according to the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project's 2010 World News Future & Change Study. Participants will learn about new revenue and channel opportunities such as:
- online, video and mobile advertising
- paid content online
- audience development and high-yield revenue-making
- new product development, and much more.

We will visit both new media and traditional companies, including: Google, Yahoo!, Hewlett Packard, Stanford University, Nokia, and more.

Visit the study tour sign-up page for more information.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-07 22:07

The City University of New York (CUNY) announced on Monday that is creating an Entrepreneurial Journalism masters degree programme, reports The New York Times. Stephen B. Shepard, the founding dean of the school, comments "We're all very concerned about sustaining quality journalism, and we think the future of journalism is going to be entrepreneurial." For some, maintaining quality journalism and mixing reporting with business is contradictory.

As noted by Journalism.co.uk, CUNY has already invested in entrepreneurial journalism programs, such as its hyperlocal partnership with Patch and its research endeavors concerning business models in the news industry. With over $6 million in funding, mainly derived from the Tow Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the creation of a new masters program appeared to be the next logical step. The Entrepreneurial Journalism M.A. two-year program will refine students' business and research skills along with assisting and encouraging them to launch their own startup projects. Additional new programs are currently being considered for working professionals in the journalism field.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-21 15:17

A recent post on Alan Mutter's Reflections of a Newsosaur blog has rasied concerns over the potentially devasting impact the current financial crisis in the newspaper industry could have on the willingness of students to choose journalism as a profession.

Mutter argues that in a time where employment opportunities are shrinking and those who do manage to secure jobs are paid a pittance, a 'substantial percentage of the next generation of professional journalists' could be wiped out in a movement he dubs 'journicide.'

"Journicide has been under way since newspapers and other mainstream media began losing their formidable revenue-generating juju in 2006. The elimination of full-time professional journalism jobs since then has been so relentless that it has become remarkably, depressingly commonplace," he writes.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 18:16

Journalism students graduating from both Columbia University and CUNY's Graduate School in New York are finding jobs in their field, surprising to many, as many news outlets cut back, Daily Finance reported Thursday.

At Columbia, 64 percent of Graduate School of Journalism students (194 in total) found employment in their field after graduation.

Elizabeth Weinreb Fishman, Columbia University's associate dean of communications, told Daily Finance that the 64 percent recent graduates now employed in the field is actually on the low side, as many students have received job offers in the past couple of weeks, following graduation. She said this is due to the prestigious Columbia name and "the truly prodigious efforts of our career services team."

At CUNY's journalism programme, of the last class to graduate (in December 2008), with 45 students, 60 percent now have full-time jobs in the journalism field, while 15 percent have "quasi-full-time internships or freelance gigs," Stephen B. Shepard, the school's dean, told Daily Finance. He credits this to students learning to practice the trade across all media platforms, which makes them valuable to newsrooms beefing up digital areas.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-12 09:25

The Journalism and Research Initiative (JATRI), which is included in the $18 million allotted by the U.S. government for the Promoting Governance, Accountability, Transparency and Integrity project, will "develop and promote investigative journalism at the city's Brac University," The Daily Star reported Friday.

At the launch celebration for the centre, Information Minister Abul Kaleem Azad spoke of the declining integrity amongst media professionals and organisations saying, "it has become a regular phenomenon that whenever a man manages to have some money, he or she wants to own a media house, either it be newspaper or television channel or radio station."

The editor of the Bangladeshi newspaper Prothom Alo maintained that readers expect more from their newspapers and journalists, saying they don't want to read a publication that "acts like a mouthpiece of any political party."

The JATRI centre will focus on training, analysing and educating students in the field of investigative journalism, the Daily Star reported in an article posted by Asia Media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-11 12:51

While interest in the profession remains steady, journalism students are having difficulties finding work and are seeking alternative futures outside the newsroom, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported. Enrollment at the University of Iowa's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has remained strong; however, graduates are finding it increasingly difficult to find jobs as newspapers across the U.S. make staff cuts, and in some cases, close.

Students are changing or adding degrees in fields outside journalism, enrolling in post graduate courses or taking time to travel while the news industry attempts to find a suitable model for the contemporary online environment.
"Somebody's got to pay for it, somehow," Associate Professor Don McLeese told the Press Citizen of the newspaper's ailing business model. "Somehow, someone has to figure out a way to generate money."

Senior Emileigh Barnes, the editor-in-chief at the university's student newspaper The Daily Iowan, has postponed a future in the industry.

"I had an overwhelming fear that I would move across the country, get a job at a newspaper and get laid off two months later," Barnes told the Press Citizen. The Daily Iowan scholarship recipient and national Hearst Journalism competition runner-up will instead take a two-year break from journalism at graduate school for poetry writing. Barnes said she was unaware of any seniors at The Daily Iowan who have found jobs in the journalism industry.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-07 11:28

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