Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


e-reader

Kobo, the eReader device backed by Indigo Books & Music, Borders, REDgroup Retail, Cheung Kong Holdings, and other leaders in technology and retail, announced it will offer newspaper and magazine subscriptions.

The selection includes "dozens of top U.S. and Canadian publications", according to the company, WebProNews reported.

As an added bonus, the company said it is now offering a two-week free trial period.

After that, the monthly subscription prices start at $13.99 for newspapers and $2.99 for magazines. All content are delivered automatically to the device as soon as they're published, according to CrunchGear.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-27 21:32

Being able to buy an issue or subscription on one device, and then access it across devices makes sense for device and app users. And, for the most part, it also makes sense for the makers of gadgets - Apple, Amazon, and others. However, it doesn't make sense for publishers looking to sell their own multi-platform subscriptions, paidContent's Staci Kramer wrote yesterday.

It is in the publisher's best interest to control their customer relationships and their brands across devices. Amazon announced its vision is to allow customers to "buy once, read everywhere" - a stance that could lead to content creators locking horns with device-makers.

Image via Melville House Publishing

For example, Kramer writes: "The NYT has invested considerable resources in an iPad app that eventually will be part of its metered plans. Selling subscriptions on the Kindle or Nook makes sense. Selling one that works on an iPad and competes with that, not so much."

Amazon has also said that in the future, it will allow users to lend e-books on the Kindle for 14 days, depending on the publisher's discretion, Retail Digital reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-26 23:58

Barnes & Noble is expected to launch its new Nook Color reader next Tuesday, CNet reported yesterday. According to The New York Times, the book retailer also teamed up with U.S.-based department store chain Wal-Mart for the sale of previous models across 2,500 stores of its outlets, starting October 24.

The 7-inch touch screen e-reader will reportedly be powered by Google's Android operating system, according to a "reliable" anonymous source, CNet informed. Wired News explained that it might not have "quite as much functionality as the iPad or full Android tablet," which is hinted by Nook Color's relatively cheaper US$249 cost.

Image of previous Nook reader from gizmag

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-22 18:45

An analyst for a big Australian-based investment bank suggested that Fairfax Media Ltd. could gain its earnings by shutting down the print editions of The Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne's The Age and focusing on e-readers and online, The National Business Review reported.

According to the report from Macquarie, Australia's biggest investment bank, dropping print editions and delivering content via e-readers could "boost earnings from the two papers to A$55 million - $5 million more than the bank's 2010 forecast, the Australian reported.

Analyst Alex Pollak said Fairfax could "get the ball rolling by spending about $50 million to give away 100,000 e-readers to seed the migration of readers away from print."

"The point is such a move is likely, but not in its entirety on day one -- a seismic structural shift like this will take time for Fairfax to convince both advertisers and consumers alike of its merits," he added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-05 23:43

Following the success of subscription sales by The Times and The Wall Street Journal iPad apps, News Corp. is "nearing a decision on whether to start a news organization to provide content for a subscription application on digital tablet devices such as Apple's iPad," Kenneth LiFinancial Times reported today.

With 5,000 subscriptions in London three days after launching The Times iPad app, and 10,000 iPad subscriptions to The Wall Street Journal, there is a chance that readers "are willing to pay for portability." A decision on whether plans for the tablet-content unit will be shelved or carried out is due by autumn.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-30 15:38

Following the iPad's big splash into the tablet market this spring, today Amazon cut the price of its e-reader, the Kindle, while Barnes & Noble reduced the price of its Nook.

Both e-readers previously sold for US$259. Now, the Nook's pricetag is $199 and the Kindle is $189; Barnes & Noble has also launched a Wi-Fi-only Nook for $149. Comparatively, the iPad's lowest-priced version is $499.

Both devices are less sleek than the iPad, lacking a colour screen, apps, or capability to play video, for example. However, the price cuts could be what the e-reader platform needs in order to become more mainstream, the Wall Street Journal reports.

At the same time, a "price war for low-end e-readers could force Barnes & Noble and Amazon to rely more heavily on their profit from selling e-books. Under so-called agency sales agreements with many top publishers, e-bookstores keep about 30% of the sale price of e-books," the WSJ's Geoffrey A. Fowler writes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-22 23:23

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has bought e-reading platform Skiff and purchased a share in Journalism Online, a company formed to enable newspapers, magazines, and online-only publishers to collect revenue from online readers.

Murdoch's acquisition of Skiff signifies another step in his effort to make online readers pay for content. Jon Miller, chief digital officer of News Corp., said "both Skiff and Journalism Online serve as key building blocks in our strategy to transform the publishing industry and ensure consumers will have continued access to the highest quality journalism."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-15 17:32

IRex Technologies, maker of the e-reader iLiad, has filed for bankruptcy, reports paidContent. The company, which began selling the iRex DR800SG in February, reports that sales of the device have been below expectations.

The DR800SG had received a good deal of attention for it's unique model, which gave publishers more control over the distribution of their content. Unlike Amazon's Kindle, iRex's device allowed for publishers to set their own prices. Moreover the company, which does lack brand recognition by consumers, has distribution agreements with both Best Buy and Barnes and Noble.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-11 19:18

A select group of U.S. reviewers were given an Apple iPad a week ago, and yesterday the Wall Street Journal's Walter Mossberg wrote that he believes the device is "pretty close" to being a "laptop killer."

If people view the iPad as just another device they have to carry around, they likely won't be interested in large numbers. However, if they think they can replace their heavier laptops most of the time, for tasks like using e-mail, viewing photos and videos, playing games and surfing the Internet, "it could be a game changer the way Apple's iPhone has been," Mossberg wrote in a column for All Things Digital.

"My verdict is that, while it has compromises and drawbacks, the iPad can indeed replace a laptop for most data communication, content consumption and even limited content creation, a lot of the time. But it all depends on how you use your computer," he stated, but noted that for bigger tasks, like editing large spreadsheets or documents, you'll still need your laptop.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-02 00:10

Newspapers are eager for the iPad to hit shelves April 3, but most iPad versions are still just concepts, paidContent:UK reported today.

Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf has posted its concept video on YouTube, while another publisher in the Netherlands said publishers have been having "secretive" meetings with Apple ahead of the iPad launch.

"But, for all the iPad concepts we've seen lately, many are still only that. De Telegraaf's video is a corporate montage designed to depict a forward-thinking multi-platform publisher, but it doesn't exist," paidContent's Robert Andrews pointed out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-12 23:55

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