Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


e-book

Sometimes a story's too long to be an article, too short to be a book. What can publishers do? Increasingly, the answer has been to publish e-singles.

The concept has been around for a while. Almost a year ago, the New York Times published an article about the Atavist, an app launched in January 2011 as a platform for long-form stories, enhanced with high-quality photography, videos and audio features.

Atavist co-founder Evan Ratliff described the gap his project filled in the market: "in the digital realm, there is infinite space, but somehow this hasn't resulted in a flowering of long-form content." Fellow founder Nicholas Thompson added, "the Web is good at creating short and snappy bits of information, but not so much when it comes to long-form, edited, fact-and-spell-checked work"

Other publishers had also been trying to appeal to the same niche. Amazon is credited with starting the trend, with the release of Kindle singles in January 2011. Byliner launched in April as a publisher and social network for producing and selling long articles/non-fiction stories. Traditional publishers including Penguin and Random House are also in on the trend.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-25 17:42

Book publishers are surrounded by hungry new competitors: Amazon, with its steadily growing imprints; authors who publish their own e-books; online start-ups like The Atavist and Byliner.

Now they have to contend with another group elbowing into their territory: news organizations.

Swiftly and at little cost, newspapers, magazines and sites like The Huffington Post are hunting for revenue by publishing their own version of e-books, either using brand-new content or repurposing material that they may have given away free in the past.

Continue reading in The New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-20 11:23

As more people buy e-readers and download books through digital stores, some news organizations are finding they can capitalize on their expertise and archives of information by quickly publishing e-books related to big stories.

The Washington Post and ABC News each generated books about the killing of Osama bin Laden shortly after the news broke.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-20 14:05

E-books are hot: Amazon recently announced that it's selling more e-books than print titles. And e-books are now included on the New York Times' bestseller list. So the time may be right for news organizations to start making serious money on their voluminous archives, by repackaging content as e-books...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-30 17:08

Google announced it will launch its e-book marketplace, called Google Editions, by the end of the year, The New York Times's Media Decoder blog reported today.

The online bookstore was originally planned to open next summer, but the date has been moved up following the online giant's settlement with the Authors Guild, the Association of American Publishers and several other publishers and authors over the rights to publish their books and make them searchable, Fortune noted, pointing out that "the timing is not a coincidence."

Image: thinkdigit.com

In fact, Fortune's Seth Weintraub writes that he thinks Google's bookstore will "change the ebook industry." This is because Google's existing Adsense and Google Display website publishers will only serve to propel the service along immediately through ad spaces already set up. Google will also automatically be able to drive sales by giving "relevant-to-content book listings with the embedded ability to preview portions of a book." (For the full list of reasons visit his article here).

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-01 21:59

Citing no concrete figures, Sony announced yesterday it would disappoint some online shoppers who preordered its Kindle-like e-reader for US$399, The Associated Press reported yesterday. The company blamed high demand for the backlog of its Reader Daily Edition shipments, which may not make it to buyers in time for Christmas, Reuters reported.

The handheld electronic text storage device is intended to entirely replace printed matter. Sony promised to announce this month which newspapers it would be delivering as part of its default content package, DarkVision Hardware today reported.

The Daily Edition letdown comes even as Sony makes gains in the educational market, with Blyth Academy in Toronto, Canada making Sony's Touch Edition compulsory for all its high school students, engadget yesterday reported.

Device Magazine today reported that other handhelds would soon enter the market, including the nReader by BenQ, at about half the price.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-19 17:20

Google intends to sell and distribute e-books on behalf of its publishing partners within the year, according to an InformationWeek article out Monday.

"We've consistently maintained that we're committed to helping our partners find more ways to make their books accessible and available for purchase," Google spokesman Gabriel Stricker said in an e-mail, according to InformationWeek. "By end of this year, we hope to give publisher partners an additional way to sell their books by allowing users to purchase access to partner program books online. We want to build and support a digital book ecosystem to allow our partner publishers to make their books available for purchase from any Web-enabled device."

Google is eager to smooth the ruffled feathers of authors, who were critical of the Google Book Search service. Introduced in 2004, the book search digitised authors' works without permission and Google was taken to court a year later for copyright breach. The parties reached a settlement currently under review by the courts and the U.S. Justice Department.

The e-book sale and distribution will serve members of the Google Book Service Partner Program, which encourages the introduction and access of books through Google Book Search.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-03 16:51

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