Date

Wed - 18.10.2017


Dow Jones

Dow Jones is beefing up its infrastructure facilities to better compete with rivals The New York Times and other national newspapers. The U.S. business and financial news provider is investing its hopes in a multimillion dollar project that aims to boost colour capacity at its U.S production sites nationwide, NewsandTech.com reported.

The upgrades are scheduled to be completed by September 2011. This upgrade will double the colour capacity of the Wall Street Journal, by providing up to 48 pages of colour

As a part of this upgrade, the company will be adding new colour towers at its seven print sites in United States and at contracted sites that include the Chicago Tribune, Miami Herald and others, sources told NewsandTech.com. The towers installed will include a mix of Goss International Colorliner and Metrocolor units, which the company is acquiring from shuttered or downsized plants of other publishers.

Dow Jones' chief communications officer declined to comment about the project, according to NewsandTech.com. Dow Jones is owned by News Corporation.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-10 16:16

As the Wall Street Journal plans to launch its new 10-page metro edition today, with the admitted purpose of competing directly with The New York Times, analysts everywhere are asking why.

The Journal's metro launch will cost it US$30 million over the next two years, and the paper is not particularly prized by locals for its New York city coverage. But this move comes as an obvious extension of what has been an ongoing battle against The Times since Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. bought Dow Jones, the WSJ's parent company, in 2007.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Photo: Huffington Post

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-26 20:47

Dow Jones & Co. has acquired the 50 percent of SmartMoney it didn't already own, gaining complete control of the franchise from U.S. publisher Hearst Corp, BtoB Media Business reported yesterday. The brand includes SmartMoney magazine, Smartmoney.com and SmartMoney Custom Solutions, a custom publishing business. Hearst and Dow Jones first partnered on SmartMoney in 1991.

The news and business information group has also launched a new site, called Reprint Portal (reprintportal.com). The new site will take reprint orders for Dow Jones Factivia's content partners. In its beta period, the site offered content from The Associated Press, SourceMedia (a b-to-b publisher) and Dow Jones, according to BtoB.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-03 22:22

Dow Jones Media Group's subscription site, Financial News, has relaunched with a new look, and will maintain its place in the WSJ Digital Network as a standalone site, paidContent reported. While subsidiaries of Rupert Murdoch's newspapers continue to expand and charge consumers for business content, such as WSJ.com, Dow Jones seems to have resisted "what may have been a temptation to roll Financial News in with WSJ more widely."

Financial News, which covers the London securities market and has more than 47,000 subscribers, has 1,100 paying site license holders. However, specific licensing costs weren't disclosed by the group, which told paidContent that "pricing is based on the particular needs of the customer."

The newly designed Financial News site focuses on four core news sectors: asset management, investment banking, private equity and trading and technology, whilst offering innovative data tools, refined navigation, personalisation features and a new blog called "Financial Muse," according to a press release posted by the UK Association of Online Publishers.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-16 21:50

The Wall Street Journal print and online editions will be separated into different business groups under a Dow Jones corporate reorganisation, its president announced in a memo.

Under the restructure, president Todd Larsen wrote, five separate business groups will each operate with a clear profit and loss approach:

  • - The Wall Street Journal in print
  • - The Wall Street Journal Digital Network
  • - Dow Jones Financial Markets, which includes Newswires and products for financial professionals
  • - Dow Jones Corporate Markets, which includes Factiva
  • - Dow Jones Indexes.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-26 19:53

Two more newspapers under the Dow Jones Media Local Group umbrella began charging for online content this week. Both the Standard Times and the Record put up paywalls on Tuesday, both papers announced.

"The Record is one of the first daily newspapers to establish a "pay wall" for its Web site. But virtually every newspaper company and many individual newspapers are working on similar models. They will be common before long," wrote Mike Klocke, the editor of the Stockton, California Record.

The Standard-Times, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, also began charging for its Web site, SouthCoastToday.com. Weekly all-access will be $4.60 per week, according to the paper's site.

German publisher Axel Springer began charging for some of its online newspapers last month, while the Economist introduced a paywall for its print edition content list and entertainment trade publication Variety began charging for online content, the Economist reported. The New York Times is pondering a similar move, according to a statement.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-14 22:33

Two U.S. newspaper publishers in the Dow Jones Local Media Group will begin charging for online content in January, paidContent reported yesterday. The San Joaquin Media Group and SouthCoast Media Group will roll out at least partial paywalls.

Registered members to SouthCoast sites will be able to view 10 free articles and videos each month, while unregistered users will be able to view three free items a month. San Joaquin Media Group publishes Recordnet.com, which reported that some content, such as blogs, weather, classified advertising, calendars, puzzles and national and international news, will remain free for all visitors, as well as three visits per month for local news content.

The rate for an all-access subscription to Recordnet.com will be US$2.67 per week for new subscribers. For current print subscribers, unlimited online access will cost an additional 77 cents per week.

"Recordnet.com has established its value with readers and advertisers in the communities it serves," said Roger Coover, president of San Joaquin Media Group and publisher of the Record, according to the Web site. "This shift asks readers to recognize that value irrespective of whether they read the newspaper in print or online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-22 19:23

Information and content services company YellowBrix has bought online news syndicator Screaming Media from Dow Jones & Co. to "expand its reach into the corporate world," Dow Jones Newswires reported today.

Terms of the sale were not released. Screaming Media was previously owned by MarketWatch, which purchased the company for US$103 million in 2003. MarketWatch was bought by Dow Jones in 2004 for $519 million. Both are now owned by News Corp.

"The acquisition of Screaming Media further complements the YellowBrix customer and content network," Jeff Massa, president and CEO said in a press release. "The acquisition further extends YellowBrix' reach into the corporate community, and will continue to strengthen our position as a leading provider of targeted business news and syndicated information solutions to the corporate market."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-24 18:28

The Wall Street Journal is set to form a partnership with Japanese financial services group SBI Holdings Inc. to launch a Japanese edition of the newspaper's online offerings, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

The addition of a Japanese edition means the Wall Street Journal will be available in five languages: English, Chinese, Spanish, Portuguese and Japanese. The launch also furthers the Journal's push into the global market, specifically the world's second largest economy.
The establishment, the Wall Street Journal Japan K.K., will be launched in mid-May, beginning with a capital base of 400 million yen, SBI announced in a statement. Dow Jones will own 60 percent, while Tokyo-based SBI will hold 40 percent.

The new company hopes to have the Japanese Web site running within the year, SBI said.

The site will offer translations of the Wall Street Journals articles and columns, a complete version of the newspaper's multimedia services and a mobile service for the Japanese cell phone market, according to the AP article, posted by the Chicago Tribune.

Since the purchase of Dow Jones by News Corp. in 2007, the company has sought to expose the brand to a much larger global audience. The Wall Street Journal earlier this year reached out to Asian and European online markets and has also introduced an Indian online edition.

SBI Holdings is based in Tokyo and operates Japan's largest online brokerage, SBI Securities Co.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-08 08:59

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