Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


digital

Daily Mail & General Trust has bought up the international recruitment site Jobrapido for €30 million, the company announced on Monday.

DMGT stated that its subsidiary A&N Media, which operates Daily Mail publisher Associated Newspapers and regional newspaper publisher Northcliffe Media, will combine Jobrapido with its existing recruitment business, which includes the UK recruitment platform Jobsite, and the international sites OilCareers and Broadbean. With the acquisition of Jobrapido, the recruitment group is being rebranded under the name ‘Evenbase’.

The company may be hoping that the purchase will reduce the impact of its shrinking local news publishing business. As we reported earlier, DMGT published its half-year financial report yesterday, revealing that revenue at Northcliffe Media has dropped by 10%, advertising by 11% and advertising by 5%. The company announced growth in digital revenues at Associated Newspapers, which publishes Mail Online, but it predicted that its operating profits and pre tax profits would be less this year than in the first half of 2011.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-18 12:18

As Metro International, with 17 million readers of its free daily around the world, extends its “Metro Moment” to more digital platforms, Maggie Samways makes one promise: “There will be no paywall in Metro’s future. Scout’s honour.”

Samways, Executive Vice President and Global Editor-in-Chief of Metro International in the UK, presented the company’s digital strategy which is more about “extending the Metro Moment than defending it,” she says.

That Metro Moment occurs every morning as readers commute to work between 7 and 9 a.m. For most, that has meant reading Metro’s print edition. But today that is being challenged by the onslaught of other platforms.

“The most important thing for us is to be true to our DNA and that is the Metro Moment. To continue to define what that means to us and our readers and especially what that means to them on mobile, tablets, and web.”

In essence, Samways says Metro wants to build new distribution channels, gain unique access to online audiences and thus create new Metro Moments. “We will use the print product to build awareness of our new products, continue to target people on the move and create some of those ‘lean back’ moments with Metro using verticals that are relevant to readers.”

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog.

Author

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-18 10:23

“I am bored sick of talking about paywalls,” said Tom Whitwell, editorial director of Times Digital. “Instead of debating payment models we need to learn how to build digital products that people are willing to pay for,” he continued.

The Times launched a controversial paid online strategy in summer 2010, which gives no access to non-subscribers. “Every commentator told us we were wrong,” said Whitwell, but he believes it is necessary to be “fearless,” and now the paper has 130,000 paying digital subscribers.

Readers were surveyed about how best to charge online and the biggest thing that came out of the discussions was the need for simplicity: a straightforward system where people knew what they were getting for their money.

Subscribers pay £2 a week for web access plus mobile, £4 a week for web, mobile and tablet, or £6 per week for all digital access plus a daily print edition.

This is working because of the quality of the paper’s journalism, said Whitwell. “The only way we can charge £4 a week to read our stuff is because of our journalism,” he stressed.

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-18 09:49

With the rise of digital technology, and the decline of print, is publishing even a business any more? Digital media guru Clay Shirky, quoted in a recent article by Mathew Ingram for GigaOm, suggests maybe not.

“Publishing is going away. Because the word ‘publishing’ means a cadre of professionals who are taking on the incredible difficulty and complexity and expense of making something public,” writes Shirky in an article for the social reading service Findings.com. ‘That’s not a job anymore. That’s a button. There’s a button that says “publish,” and when you press it, it’s done.”

Shirky continues that, in the past “we had a class of people called publishers because it took special professional skill to make words and images visible to the public. Now it doesn’t take professional skills. It doesn’t take any skills. It takes a WordPress install.”

In his article commenting on Shirky’s piece, Ingram points out that the statement is a “bit disingenuous.” He argues that, in fact, publishing books, magazines and newspapers normally requires more sophisticated tools than a blog platform.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-13 16:50

Like many media companies, the Telegraph in the United Kingdom is developing its digital business in many directions – mobile, tablets, video, subscriptions, data -- all at the same time.

“Do yourself a favour, the first area you need to transform is the technology area,” says Allan Marshall, a consultant who is helping the Telegraph make the transformation.

Mr Marshall, Joint Principal of Australia-based iMedia Advisory, is a strong advocate of outsourcing technological needs. “If anyone says you have to have the technology development in-house, I’m sorry, but they’re taking you back to the past,” he says.

Outsourcing the technological solutions will reduce personnel, save money and allow you to do more at once, he says.

“The days of having technology in-house means you were restricted,” he says. “If the team was focused on a major project, all other projects were put aside.”

“You need to work with outside partners – it will save you money. You’ll get arguments from the IT department, but it doesn’t hold water.”

Mr Marshall’s wide-ranging presentation of The Telegraph’s current digital transformation illustrated just how quickly the news media world is changing.

“It’s all about information and data being at the heart of what we do,” said Mr Marshall. “You need to look at a clear strategy, focused at the customer. And if you don’t do that, you’re in trouble. You also have to look at your quality.  Focus on quality, and give the audience what they want.”

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-13 09:26

Fairfax Media has been publishing newspapers in Australia since before there was an Australia – so making the change from a newspaper company to a multimedia company is no easy matter.

But there isn’t any choice, says Jack Matthew, Chief Executive Officer for Australia-based Fairfax’s Metro Media, the keynote speaker at Publish Asia. Not because of audience decline – it has actually increased – but because the revenue model has changed.

Print audience is declining, but, thanks to digital media, the overall audience grew 30 per cent over the past five years, he said.

“We don’t have a content problem. More people consume our content today than ever have in the past,” he said. “What we have is a business model problem.”

Like a lot of media companies, Fairfax faces the “print dollars, digital cents” conundrum – the revenues that come from digital advertising and audiences is not replacing those lost to print.

Mr Matthew believes Fairfax has come up with a solution: maintain quality journalism as the “secret sauce” as the core of the business, but change the way of looking at the audience.

He believes that only by changing the traditional metric based on circulation to one based on overall audience can newspaper companies succeed – “not talking about platforms but talking about eyeballs.” He said the goal is to “sell targeted eyeballs across all platforms in a highly engaged atmosphere”.

“That won’t only protect your yield, it will grow your yield,” he said.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-11 09:31

The Boston Globe announced yesterday that it was following in the footsteps of other newspapers and launching an ePaper edition for online and print subscribers, according to boston.com. The ePaper version, which mirrors the format of the print paper, can be read on a laptop or downloaded as an app for smartphones and tablets, the article said.

The “replica edition” contains additional digital features such as page-turning, navigation scrolling and bookmarking, the article said. The new version also features a “text-to-speech” option, which can read selected articles or the entire newspaper aloud.

According to the description from the iTunes app store, users can choose a setting in which Apple Newsstand automatically downloads the paper daily, just like a print version would be delivered each day. The description also states that users can click on articles to access embedded links or share those articles on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

Subscribers can obtain the ePaper from bostonglobe.com or download the app from the iTunes store, while non-subscribers can purchase single issues for $0.99 or in-app subscriptions for $14.99 per month, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 13:49

There’s nothing unusual about newsroom cuts these days, but that doesn’t help make them any less painful. And last week, that pain seems to have been particularly widespread. Media Bistro reported on Thursday that Bloomberg TV is cutting 30 staff positions, and CNN has let “dozens” of staff go from its two documentary units. A couple days earlier, as we reported, the LA Times also laid off between 12 and 20 staff members. On the other side of the Atlantic, The Guardian reports that media group Northern & Shell will be eliminating around 70 editorial posts across the Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily Star and Daily Star Sunday.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:02

The news industry is transitioning from print to digital, and nobody said it was going to be easy. For one thing, many news publications still simply make more money from the shrinking paper side of their business than from the growing digital end. But as newspapers struggle to make the switch, perhaps part of the problem isn’t financial; it’s that newrooms are hooked on print. 

This is the argument made by two recent articles, one published by Nieman Lab, the other by Poynter, which suggest that journalists have been struggling to prioritise digital content because their professional environments reward them for achievements in the printed paper, but don’t incentivise their work online. 

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-13 18:04

The disruption that digital technology is causing in the publishing business is old news now. But as the debate rumbles on about how best to monetize digital content, arguably one platform isn’t being given as much thought as it deserves: mobile.

Last month the Washington Post shared a graph produced by mobile analytics firm Flurry, which compares the proportion of time that American media consumers spend with TV, web, print, radio and mobile with the proportion of money that advertisers spend on those platforms.

Data showed that American users were consuming media 22% of the time on the web, while advertisers only spent 16% of their money there. While these numbers are a little worrying, on mobile, the imbalance was far worse. Readers consumed media via mobile devices a whopping 23% of the time, but advertisers only spent 1% of the money on this platform.

Last Friday, Press Gazette quoted Ken Breen, the managing consultant for consumer media at Thomson Reuters, who said that, when it came to smartphones, news organisations were on a “journey from Kansas to Oz,” adding “we’re smack bang in the middle of a tornado at the moment."

Breen, who spoke at Press Gazette's News on the Move conference, is quoted by the publication.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-12 18:11

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