Date

Sun - 20.08.2017


digital advertising

The New York Times Company’s share price experienced its furthest one-day drop in three years today after the company released third quarter results that showed an 85 percent decline in net income on the period a year earlier.

While analysts had predicted an average third quarter profit of 8 cents a share, the company reported a loss from continuing operations (excluding severance and other costs) of 1 cent a share.

During the quarterly earnings call today, Twitter users noted under the $NYT symbol that the company’s share price had fallen by 11, 13, and then 17 percent. (The decline stood at 14.6 percent at time of publication. View current price here).

On the call, Chairman and Interim CEO Arthur Sulzberger Jr. listed video, mobile and international expansion among growth areas for the company, and spoke of its engagement with Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google +, its new presence on Flipboard, and its experimental HTML 5 app for the iPad as crucial elements in its strategy.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-25 17:54

“The change in the industry right now is the most dramatic I've ever seen... Virtually every paper in the country is, if not diving head first, at least dipping [its] toes into video,” said videographer Chuck Fadley to the American Journalism Review.

That was nearly four years ago; it is now safe to say they are doing canon balls.

The New York Times, which started including videos with digital news stories seven years ago, now produces approximately 120 videos per month, and streams two live shows to its website every business day. The Wall Street Journal, which began shooting video more than three years ago, now produces about 50 clips per day, as well as nine live shows from around the globe. Meanwhile, the U.S. edition of the Huffington Post has recently unveiled HuffPost Live, a plan to stream live video to its website for 12 hours five days a week beginning on August 13.

Logically enough, the news content is attracted by the prospect of advertising revenue.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-23 15:03

The US newspaper industry is facing some very bad news: growth in digital ad revenue is declining. A story published by Reuters today states that, according to statistics from the Newspaper Association of America, digital ad revenues at newspapers are up just 1% from a year ago, making this the fifth quarter in a row that growth has dropped.

Reuters reports that online ad revenues at the New York Times Company experienced a 2.3% drop to $48 million in the first quarter, compared to the same period the year before. At the Washington Post Company, online ad revenue fell 7% to $24.2 million, the article says.

What’s going wrong? Reuters says that experts blame the existence of too much advertising space online, the rise in discount-rate ad spots, and a tough economic climate in the US for the slowdown.

When the New York Times Company originally announced its decline in digital ad revenue, paidContent reported on an earnings call with CFO James Follo, who “explained that digital ad sales have long been insulated from macro-economic events. Starting in 2011, however, these ad sales began to be sensitive to the European debt crisis and other events that affect print ad sales.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-07 14:43

In 2012, Aftonbladet in Sweden will cross a digital-print barrier that most publishers are dreaming about: Its digital advertising revenues will exceed those from print.

Anders Berglund (right in photo), Sales Director of Aftonbladet, and Kalle Jungkvist, Senior Advisor of Schibsted Media Group, publisher of Aftonbladet, said the Scandinavian publishing pioneers are not resting on their laurels as the company intends to ramp up all sales activities.

“Growth and reach are at the core of our strategy,” said Jungkvist. “We see so many opportunities to commercialise our business on all the emerging digital platforms.”

Aftonbladet has a daily print circulation of 260,000, and more than 50 per cent of the population visits its website weekly. Schibsted launched its freemium model in 2002 and has attracted 150,000 subscribers, features other paid services and in total makes up about 25 percent of revenues.

It doesn’t hurt that the company has the ever-evolving and growing online classified portal Blocket in its portfolio; 7 out of 10 Swedes have sold or purchased something on the site. Schibsted owns about 25 companies in various fields of content and advertising that give it a strong foundation from which to expand.

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog.

Author

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-17 09:27

Next Issue Media, comprised of Hearst Corporation, Condé Nast, News Corporation, Meredith and Time Inc., just launched its digital magazine consortium which allows subscribers to pay a monthly flat rate for access to various top-selling magazines, The New York Times Media Decoder blog reported.

After downloading the Next Issue Media tablet app, users choose to pay either $9.99 for access to all monthly publications available on the app or $14.99 for all monthly and weekly publications, the article said.

According to the Next Issue Media website, current magazines available to users include Time, The New Yorker, Better Homes and Gardens, Esquire, People, Elle and Vanity Fair, among others.

Offering a flat rate payment could save readers a great deal of money on subsciptions, since many individual magazine apps range from $1.99 to $5.99 per single issue, Media Decoder said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-04 12:21

For news publishers, there's no doubt that the digital age has well and truly arrived. eMarketer published a report in January predicting that online advertising spending in the United States will overtake print this year.

Spending on online ads in the US grew by 23% last year, totaling $32.03 billion, estimates eMarketer. The company, which provides analysis of internet market trends based on its own assessment of ad selling companies' reported revenues as well as on data from other industry sources, predicts that online ad spending will grow another 23.3% this year, to reach $39.5 billion.

Meanwhile, US print advertising, which totaled an estimated $36 billion in 2011, is expected to drop to $33.8 billion.

eMarketer forecasts a significant rise in online ad spending over the next five years; it predicts that by the year 2016, online ad spending will total $62 billion in the United States, and that print spending will drop to $32.3 billion.

Compared to other industry analysts, eMarketer's predictions are high, yet all forecast a meaningful rise in online ad spending in the coming years.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-03 14:02

In the "next few years," China is set to be WPP Plc's third-largest market, and could lead to US$1 billion in revenue from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong combined, CEO Martin Sorrell said at a Shangai press conference today announcing the acquisition of a minority stake in Leading Smart Holdings Ltd., Bloomberg reported.

The London-based firm is the world's biggest advertising company. It's four biggest markets now are the United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany, he said. WPP Digital, the digital investment arm of WPP, has made the acquisition. Leading Smart Holdings is a BVI company, and has a controlling stake in Movement Systems' parent company, which is China's top digital advertising measurement company, according to Dow Jones.

Photo via WPP's website: Martin Sorrell
Sorrell has regularly pointed to the BRIC countries as one of the top two growth opportunities, the other being digital, paidContent noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-20 23:45

The launch of Apple's iAd application may help newspaper organisations tap into the rapidly developing iPad market and the mobile advertising business.

The iAd application is one of more than 100 new user features integrated into Apple's OS 4, its latest operating system for both the iPhone and iPad. Marketed as a "new media outlet that offers consumers highly targeted information," the iAd allows application developers to generate advertisements and pocket 60 percent of the revenue. At the Apple OS 4 unveiling event, Steve Jobs highlighted the differences between this new generation of advertising, which features rich media ads that combine the "emotion" of television with the interactivity of the Web, according to Engadget.

More importantly, the iAd application represents a shift away from the Google model of search-based information gathering commonly used on laptops and desktops, towards content-based applications more in line with mobile devices. Polls have shown a drop in time spent on newspaper-owned sites but other studies indicate that a large number of iPad buyers are planning to read books and newspapers with their new gadgets.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-12 23:18

Capital Public Radio, Northern California's local National Public Radio affiliate, has joined the Sacramento Local Online Ad Network, The Sacramento Press announced yesterday. SLOAN now has more than 30 premier sites that give national and local brands a platform to buy digital media in the Sacramento region.

SLOAN was launched in January to give local, independent online publishers a place to buy digital ads for the Sacramento area.

The ad network is the first private-public partnership of its kind, Ben Ilfeld, co-founder and chief operating officer of the Sacramento Press, said in a statement.

SLOAN was designed to enable advertisers to take advantage of the network's reach and targeted audiences. It is supported by Adify's technology platform.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-18 15:52

The newspaper business model is powerless to compensate for falling print ad revenues, and the problem is not going to go away. The print model cannot and will not migrate to the Internet, where there is a "revenue black hole," in which 76 percent of all online revenues go to Google and Yahoo!, Timothy Balding, co-CEO of WAN-IFRA, told the 62nd World Newspaper Congress today.

"To compete, you will need to retain control of your content. In 2013, combined print and digital revenues will be less than print revenues in 2008," he said, citing data from ZenithOptimedia and PricewaterhouseCoopers. "Should we allow aggregators to build their business on the back of our content?"

Timothy Balding, co-CEO of WAN-IFRA. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

"There are outside forces we can't control," Balding said, referring to a chart of the Dow Jones Industrial Index over the past year that rapidly dropped off.

In terms of digital revenues, only Google posted first-half growth in 2009, he said, and in the third quarter this year, compared to the same time last year, newspaper ad revenues dropped 17 percent.

In the United States, which has been hit particularly hard, of 379 daily titles, circulation between April and December is down 10.6 percent, and digital ad revenues have fallen six quarters in a row. In 2009 in the U.S., estimates by PwC show advertising in newspapers in North America are down by more than 20 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-01 09:46

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