Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


data journalism

Big data is 2012’s big buzzword, as many predicted it would be.

The catchy term does not simply denote vast amounts of information, but refers to the emerging technologies developed and employed to gather, process and analyse the tidal wave of new data. “Big Data is really about new uses and new insights, not so much the data itself,” says Rod A. Smith, IBM’s vice president for emerging Internet technologies, in an interview with The New York Times. Human beings have produced more data information in the last two years than at any other time in history: according to IBM’s calculations, 90% of the data currently in existence was created between 2010-2012, thanks to social media posts and interactions, online-browsing history, web-purchase receipts, GPS systems, and sensor and surveillance data. The revolutionary aspect of ‘Big Data’ lies in the way in which it forms links and associations between seemingly disparate facts, leading to new perspectives and revelations.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 10:50

NPR announced yesterday that has it hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to direct a new team, dedicated to building news applications. NPR has produced news apps previously, such as this interactive look at the science of “Fracking” to extract gas, and this map of air-polluting facilities in the US. However, the staff who have worked on these types of projects haven’t been coordinated in a single department, and Boyer’s appointment will bring them together.

Mark Stencel, NPR’s Managing Editor for digital news, who will be in charge of Boyer and his team, tells Poynter; “what I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-22 15:01


As everyone from businesses to governments to individuals go digital, the amount of raw data being recorded and stored is growing at a dizzying rate. Often this data contains useful information that it is in the public interest to analyse, but it exists in a format that very few people can understand. The solution to the problem? Find experts who can convert large amounts of data into easily accessible stories. In other words, find data journalists.



These are some of the ideas fuelling Danish daily Dagbladet Information's new initiative, Nordisk Nyhedshacker 2012 ("Nordic News Hacker 2012"). The project, run in collaboration with The Guardian, Google and Syddansk Universitet's Center for Journalism, invites journalists or data experts to create a piece of data journalism - which could be anything from a data mash-up to a new mobile app - and submit it to a panel of judges. The creator of the winning entry will be given a $20,000 scholarship by Google and will be invited to work with the Guardian Data Blog in London for one month. The Center for Journalism contributes by advertising the competition and incorporating elements of data journalism into its curriculum.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 18:07

A year ago, Knight Foundation and Mozilla announced a partnership to build a "bridge between the technology and the news community". The $2.5 million project funded fellowships for technology experts to work in newsrooms around the world - from The Guardian to Zeit Online - to help tackle digital challenges.

Now, Dan Sinker, head of the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership at Mozilla has announced that the program is evolving to engage a wider community of journalist-coders.

Four main changes are going to be made to the Knight-Mozilla partnership, which is being so radically re-jigged that it has also been re-named "OpenNews".

1) The project will help organise and pay for "more than a dozen hackdays" this year in different international locations, allowing developers to experiment with coding for journalism.

2) The parternship promises to increase online resources for developers who want to learn about journalism, and for journalists who want to learn how to code.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-07 18:17

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