Date

Tue - 27.06.2017


cutbacks

The management of leading Spanish newspaper El País announced to staff on Friday a plan to lay off about 150 employees – or one third of staff – as part of a series of cutbacks to “guarantee the viability of the business in years to come.”

Other measures will include early retirement plans and salary cuts, announced Juan Luis Cebrián, President of the PRISA group and of El País, accompanied by directors of both the publishing group and the newspaper.

The managers called the cutbacks “painful” yet “inevitable,” citing a steep drop in revenue stemming from the contraction of the advertising market and reduced circulation. In the Spanish market, print advertising revenue has dropped by 53 percent and newspaper circulation by 18 percent over the last five years, directors told staff members.

“For every dollar that is made on the Internet, ten are destroyed in print,” said Cebrián. “It’s not a question of wanting to improve profitability. The newspaper can no longer support its current cost structure.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-08 17:42

There’s nothing unusual about newsroom cuts these days, but that doesn’t help make them any less painful. And last week, that pain seems to have been particularly widespread. Media Bistro reported on Thursday that Bloomberg TV is cutting 30 staff positions, and CNN has let “dozens” of staff go from its two documentary units. A couple days earlier, as we reported, the LA Times also laid off between 12 and 20 staff members. On the other side of the Atlantic, The Guardian reports that media group Northern & Shell will be eliminating around 70 editorial posts across the Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily Star and Daily Star Sunday.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:02

In July last year, Lord Chris Patten, Chairman of the BBC Trust said that high senior management pay was "one of the most toxic reasons for the public's lack of sympathy for the BBC".

Today it's clear that his concerns have been taken head on, as The Guardian reports that the BBC actually exceeded its 2009 target to cut its top management bill by 25% and its number of managers by 20%.

The BBC has slashed the amount it pays for senior managers by 27%, and the actual number of those managers by 24%.

The deadline for the savings was originally set for 2013, but it was later brought forward to the end of 2011.

The cuts bring the number of senior managers down to 484 as of December 31 2011, compared to 640 in 2009, reports Digital Spy.

According to the BBC's website, it anticipates making savings beyond its original objectives in other areas as well. The broadcaster writes that of a planned £2bn of savings between 2007 and 2012/13, "we have already delivered £1bn of savings in the first three years and are on course to exceed our targets."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-12 18:53

The Tribune Co. will next week aim to cut down on the amount of Associated Press content it uses in its papers in order to decide whether the U.S. publisher can go without content from the news cooperative.

As the company cuts costs, the experiment will hopefully indicate whether dropping the AP is a viable option next autumn, the Chicago Tribune, the publisher's flagship, reported yesterday. During the week, the publisher will use content not just from its own staff, but also from sources such as Agence France Presse, Reuters, The New York Times, the Washington Post, Bloomberg, Global Post and McClatchy newspapers. Most of these sources are not usually available to the company's newspapers, according to the Tribune's Phil Rosenthal.

Just over a year ago, the publishing company, which has declared bankruptcy, notified the AP it might end its relationship with the service. The AP requires notification two years prior to cancellation.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-03 20:11

Canadian journalists took to the streets yesterday, clamoring for discretion in their collective bargaining process with La Presse, North America's largest French-language publication, Radio-Canada reported yesterday. The staffers say that as long as publishers leverage thinly-veiled threats of job loss reported in their pages to wage their labour-and-employment battle, workers will be forced to air publicly their side of the struggle, too.

"You feel the pressure, you feel your jobs are threatened, so, inevitably, you're weaker and the feeling is very palpable in the people and this fear becomes an asset to the employer," Karim Benessaieh was quoted by Radio-Canada as saying in French.

Overall, though, they would prefer to negotiate behind closed doors, according to Radio-Canada's report. The Information Workers of La Presse Syndicate (STIP by its acronym in French) complained in September of past edicts to the union published by management in its editorial pages, as Yahoo! News Quebec then reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 16:58

The Star-Ledger of Newark, New Jersey has halved its newsroom staff in the past year, and its editor just announced his retirement. Now the paper is asking for 50 more buyouts, Editor & Publisher reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-13 17:17

While the Sun-Times Media Group has received an offer for its purchase, before the sale may be finalised it must have the approval of the company's unions, which face significant contract concessions, the Chicago Tribune reported Thursday.

Union representatives are shocked at the cost reductions they are being asked to make, which is a prerequisite for the sale of the bankrupt U.S. publisher.

"This basically guts our contract. It's a terrible, terrible thing," Tom Thibeault, executive director of the Chicago Newspaper Guild, told the Tribune. "I do not anticipate our members supporting this."

The concessions as part of a new three-year contract, which includes a reduction of the severance pay out from 50 weeks of wages to just four, the right of management to transfer and reassign employees without consulting unions and the elimination of seniority rules when making staff reductions.

Staff fear making such concessions to allow the company to keep operating will then see them without a job, according to the Tribune.

A private investment group led by Chicago banker Jim Tyree was announced as a potential purchaser on Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-11 19:09

An announcement yesterday by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel confirmed the acceptance of buyout offers by 29 full-time and five part-time staffers, Editor & Publisher reported.

Though no names have been released, several employees who opted for the buyout offer are suspected to be longtime staff members of the newspaper. Reports include veteran columnists, reporters and critics of the paper in the list of staff that will be leaving the paper.

The deadline to accept the buyout was Monday night, with layoffs to follow if not enough employees accept the deal. The buyouts mark a third attempt by the paper to reduce staff and costs. Greg Pearson of the newsroom employees union has reported that executives for the Journal Sentinel expect to have to cut "substantially more" positions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 15:04

The West Australian newspaper has reduced its staff base by nearly 9 percent, after voluntary redundancies exceeded the desired 5 percent, ABC News reported Thursday.

Early in the month the paper announced that it would seek voluntary redundancies in an attempt to cut 5 percent of its work force.

However, company secretary, Peter Bryant, today announced that 130 staff had applied for the redundancy offer.

"Due to the level of voluntary redundancies received, the Group has achieved a 8.6 per cent reduction in FTE [full-time equivalent] staffing levels," he said.

The lay off package will cost the company around $14 million but will amount to $9 million in yearly savings, according to Bryant.

He says the one-off cost of funding the job losses will be just under $14 million, but should lead to annual savings of about $9 million.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-25 11:58

Citing the "economic climate and change in structure," Ohio's Sun Newspapers plans to cut 115 employees by mid-August Crain's Cleveland Business reported.

The cuts are a result of a reorganisation plan proposed by the newspaper chain on June 11, which not only entails lay offs, but also a reduction in publication of 22 weekly papers to just 11 titles.

The cuts are reported to come from sales and editorial staff as well as a few cuts from the administrative and production staff.

Sun will rely on its sister paper, the Plain Dealer, to manage payroll and retail departments, as well as home delivery of the paper. Plain Dealer employees recently agreed to an 8.1 percent pay cut and 11 days of unpaid furlough in an effort to keep the paper printing editions seven days a week.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-24 12:36

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