Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


credibility

by Robert Hernandez

Granted, this will make for a weak lede, but allow me to start this piece with a disclosure: I, like many of you, am not a fan of prediction posts.

Typically, they aren't based on anything real and are often used to make grand statements we all roll our eyes at... and don't get me started on how often they're wrong.

That aside, here's another piece to roll your eyes at.

But here's a tweak, this is not really a prediction... this is, to be honest, more of a hopeful wish.

Okay, ready? Here goes.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-21 17:39

Newspapers are still the most used and valued local news destinations, and online is no exception, according to a new study from comScore and the Newspaper Association of America. Newspaper Web sites are the "most used and valued sites for consumers seeking credible and trustworthy local content and advertising online," the survey found.

About 57 percent of the more than 3,000 respondents said local newspaper sites are their top online sources for local information - more than the totals for all other media. The percentage is higher for those with a college education (60 percent) and households with higher incomes (63 percent).

Newspaper Web sites are also the most trusted source of online advertising, as respondents said they perceive ads on newspaper sites to be more credible, current and relevant.

"This survey reinforces the notion that consumers value and trust the premium-quality content found at newspaper Web sites as well as the advertising on those sites," said Randy Bennett, NAA's senior vice president of Business Development. "It also provides further evidence that newspapers, which attracted a record 75 million visitors in January, offer advertisers a high-value audience that no other medium can match."

The study found that local newspaper Web sites are most informative compared to other types of contents.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-25 22:12

Online news outlets in the United States are drawing more page hits and advertising revenue than public ire by posting mug shots with their Web-based crime blotters, reports Tim Padgett in Monday's edition of TIME magazine. Even print tabloids are cashing in on the craze, according to a story published in April by Reason (reprinted in The Week by permission).

The popularity of celebrity mug shots are not a new phenomenon. Meanwhile, whether galleries of ordinary citizens cross lines of ethics or good taste is still being debated, according to the article, titled Newspapers Catch Mug-Shot Mania. Either way, they "are increasingly popular features on newspaper Web sites, which are on a crusade for more page views and the advertising revenue that accompanies additional eyeballs," Padgett writes.

The Chicago Tribune is one of many leading U.S. dailies to feature an online mug shots section.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-16 22:29

Online news is beginning to rapidly draw readers away from printed, government controlled newspapers, as they offer faster, more impartial coverage, according to an AFP report Monday.

Over the last two years, Internet news based sources have grown from one to eight, offering services is Chinese, Malay and English. The country's first online newspaper, Malaysiakini opened 10 years ago, but now faces competition from titles such as the Malaysian Insider and the Malaysian Mirror, which launched last month.

Editors at traditional media outlets are braced for challenging times as the younger generation with stronger ties to technology and more skepticism of the government-linked television and newspaper outlets turn to the Internet for information.

"There is a credibility crisis with regards to what is written in mainstream media - the level of believability among the people seems to be less," Bernama national news agency Editorial Adviser Azman Ujang told AFP.

The Malayan Audit Bureau of Circulations released results for the year ending in June 2008 that revealed a average daily newspaper circulation of 2.5 million copies, a decline from 2.54 million a year earlier.

Conversely online news services have recorded steady growth in readership. Malaysiakini says it receives 2 million unique visitors per month and Malaysian Insider listed 800,000 monthly visitors.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-03 15:57

Although the first news service to report the sudden death of pop legend Michael Jackson was celebrity gossip site TMZ, using anonymous sources, technology writer Mike Elgan reported a fake news story had been created by a non-existent news service, Global Associated News, even before. Also before TMZ broke the story, Twitter users began linking to the fake story at more than 10 per second for more than half an hour, with Twitter co-founder Biz Stone saying the microblogging site "saw an instant doubling of tweets per second the moment the story broke," which slowed Twitter and at times, even caused it to stop working, PC World reported.

"I can't prove it, but I think TMZ fell for the hoax, hundreds or thousands of news organisations all over the world linked to the TMZ story, but then the fake story became real when Jackson died nearly an hour later," Elgan stated.

Graphic: Akamai Net Usage Index: News

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 21:53

The Press Complaints Commission, the British regulatory body for newspapers and magazines, announced it has noticed a lapse in the accuracy of reporting as journalism heads online, with a record number of complaints in 2008, according to Press Gazette. The Commission is also wary of the affects recent cutbacks at newspapers will have on journalistic standards.

As part of its annual report, the PCC published the details of its 4,700 complaints for 2008, an 8 percent increase from the year before. For the second year running, online stories were the source of a majority of the gripes.

According to Press Gazette, departing PCC Chairman Sir Christopher Meyer noted, "We've noticed some wobble in standards in areas of online reporting where it's clear the pressure of time and the 24-hour news cycle may have led people to put up stories which haven't been thoroughly vetted."

Meyer also attributed the record number of complaints to the success of self-regulation. He noted the success of the transition of the PCC into a multi-faceted department for public information on the media. "We have morphed from being purely a complaints service to be a citizens' advice bureau on the media," he said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-18 09:33

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