Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


cover price

The Wall Street Journal’s Deputy Managing Editor, Alan Murray, speaks to Forbes contributor Steven Rosenbaum about tracking the startling growth of WSJ’s live video presence, which reached 28 million streams in August.

Israeli newspaper Maariv "told its more than 2,000 staff on Monday that most of them will be fired by October and that the paper does not have the money to cover the severance pay they have coming if the paper closes, employees said.” Haaretzreports.

Columbia University’s Emily Bell argues that it's time to embrace the growing influence of real-time data on the media business.

The Observer, the Sunday title of UK newspaper The Guardian, is increasing its cover price by 30p starting this week, The Guardian reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-11 17:46

That is the message global media consultants Simon-Kucher & Partners is hoping to send to news publishers, with a report that makes the case for significant increases in newspaper cover prices.

Price hikes are frequently seen as tangible proof of a newspaper’s declining fortunes, a desperate attempt on editors’ parts to combat dwindling revenue. Take for example Jeff Jarvis’s reaction to the NYTimes’s decision to raise the price of its print edition by 25 percent, from $2 per copy to $2.50. Jarvis doubted the viability of such a move, believing that it aimed to “support an outmoded economic model.” Newspapers, he argued, have lost much of their pricing power as online content puts paid to the advertising models that once made newspapers a powerful economic force. Jarvis’s reflections on the impact digital has had on newspaper ad revenue is valid in the main, but his assertion that increasing cover prices is an exercise in futility finds a counter-argument in SKP’s recent study.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-03 16:07

News Corporation has confirmed that over the next year it will separate its publishing and entertainment companies, after rumours of an impending split began circulating earlier this week. In a memo addressed to staff Rupert Murdoch assures his employees that the decision will see News Corp. separate into “two global leaders in their own right […] as opposed to merely one.”

The new media and entertainment company will include many of News Corp.’s most lucrative interests, such as the broadcasters BskyB, Sky Italia, and Fox Broadcasting, as well as the hugely successful 20th Century Fox Film. Whilst there is little doubt that these businesses will continue to flourish, the same cannot be said of the soon-to-be-annexed newspaper titles. Debate is raging over whether removing the safety-net of profits generated by the entertainment businesses will see the company’s newspapers forced to shape-up, or if the measure will ultimately lead to widespread cost-cutting and titles being sold-off or even closed.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-28 17:36

Rupert Murdoch's The Sunday Times last weekend increased its cover price by 10 percent to £2.20, becoming the most expensive national Sunday newspaper in the United Kingdom, MediaWeek reported Friday.

This is the first increase in the past four years, when the cover price rose to £2.00, the Press Gazette reminded. However, News International said the price hike "is less than the rise in the retail prices index over that period," MediaGuardian quoted.

Despite The Sunday Times' move, competitors have maintained their cover prices. According MediaGuardian, The Observer costs £2, the Sunday Telegraph £1.90 and the Independent on Sunday £1.80.

Two days after the increase, British supermarket chain Asda decided to remove The Sunday Times from the shelves of its 260 stores "due to a dispute over the margin it receives for selling the title," MediaWeek informed.

According to the chain, News International is keeping 18.3p of the extra 20p of the cover price, lowering Asda's sales gain from 25 percent to 23.1 percent.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-21 18:10

South Africa's The Times is changing from a free to a paid daily, to be sold at R2 (€0.20), while The Citizen recently dropped its price from R4.5 to R3, Newspaper Innovation reported yesterday.

The recent South African newspaper price war saw rival media companies choosing opposite strategies to reverse decreasing sales. The Caxton Group's tabloid The Citizen dropped its cover price by 33 percent, while Avusa Group's The Times starts chose to become a paid newspaper instead of free, according to MediaGuardian.

Justifying the new R2 cover price for The Times, Mike Robertson, CEO of Avusa Media Division, told AllAfrica.com that it's a "price that covered all costs but still makes a profit."

The price war draws inspirations from British newspaper titles like The London Evening Standard, which doubled its circulation after becoming free, and The UK Daily Star witnessing a sales increase after reducing its cover price, according to an analysis by Professor Anton Harber, head of Wits University's journalism department, MediaGuardian reported.

Harber said he believes dropping cover prices is a short-term solution. "Rupert Murdoch has fought and won many a newspaper war by cutting prices but, at the same time, also getting editorial right," he said, according to AllAfrica.com.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-18 23:11

UK daily The Sun has launched a new print and outdoor advertising campaign touting its columnists and its lower cover price in the south east region, MarketingWeek reported yesterday.

The campaign was designed to promote the News International tabloid's lower cover price of 20 pence, down from 30 pence, as well as to capture the different writing styles of its columnists, according to MarketingWeek. Each ad features an iconic portrait photograph of a columnist along with a short tagline that reflects that writer's unique style.

The promotional pricing offered by The Sun puts pressure on its rivals, The Daily Mirror, priced at 45p and The Daily Star at 20p, according to MediaWeek. While circulation revenues are declining overall for the UK newspaper industry, the News International tile aims to increase its readership by offering promotional pricing in different regions. The latest slash in cover price will be seen in the Central TV region encompassing Birmingham and Oxford, with the title priced at 20p from 30p.

However, the time span for this aggressive promotional pricing strategy remains indefinite.

The daily has seen a fall in circulation, thrice over the past 4 months below the 3million mark, and the recent ABC audit for February indicates a circulation decline by 3.6 percent to 2,972,763, MediaWeek reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-24 21:12

The London Evening Standard will launch a mobile application later this month, aiming to connect its content with social media, Media Guardian reported today. The newspaper's print version is also now being sold again, after dropping its cover price in October.

The new mobile app will be available later this month across all major smartphone platforms, according to a press release from Handmark, the company that built the app. However, no detail was provided as to whether the app will be paid, or supported by advertising. It will deliver the newspaper in a simple, easy-to-navigate format and the "content within the mobile application will be refreshed automatically and available for offline reading."

"Our goal is to deliver our readers a quality extension to their reading experience when they don't have immediate access to the paper or the London Evening Standard Web site," Tim Smith, general manager of digital at the Evening Standard, stated in the press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-16 00:26

The Guardian's weekday cover price will go up to £1 on Sept. 7, an increase of 10p, the newspaper announced over the weekend. The Saturday edition of the UK newspaper will be raised to £1.90, up 20p.

The newspaper last increased its cover price in September 2008, and noted in its article that the newspaper market in Britain has "seen a raft of price increases" in past months; however, it does not give an exact reason for the increase.

"To offset the impact of price rises, the Guardian and the Times have joined the Daily Telegraph in operating discount subscription schemes to readers that pay for their papers up front," the article states.

According to The Telegraph, the Guardian Media Group has "refused" to rule out job cuts at its national titles for the first time last week.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-01 06:53

The New York Times has enforced a second price hike within the last 12 months as it attempts to counter the industry wide decline in advertising revenue. The weekday and Sunday editions have been given a 33 percent price rise from US$1.50 to $2. This hike comes just 11 months after the Times last increased its price, The Associated Press reported.

The price of the Sunday edition will be up $1, to $6 for the national edition and $5 for the New York edition.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-06 07:47

The Boston Globe has announced it will raise its newsstand prices from 75 cents to $1 in the Boston area and from $1 to $1.50 outside the city, The Associated Press reported.

The cost of the Sunday Globe will rise from $2.50 to $3.50 in the metropolitan area and to $4.00 elsewhere. Fees for home delivery will reportedly remain unchanged. The price hikes are in response to The New York Times Co.'s mandate that the publication's union concede to $20 million in cutbacks and savings. The Times Co. bought the New England Media Group, of which the Globe was the top publication, for $1.1 billion in 1993.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-08 11:52

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