Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


copyright

France’s Union of the National Daily Press (SPQN) is taking a keen interest in a draft law, approved by Germany’s cabinet last week, which would require aggregators such as Google News that reproduce snippets of text from news articles to pay a copyright fee to publishers, reported Le Monde on Tuesday.

The German draft law, backed by major publishing houses Axel Springer and Bertelsmann, has been nicknamed the “Lex Google” in France. Initially put forth by the Federation of German News Publishers, its intention is to allow publishers to recover some of the advertising revenue that they say is lost to aggregators who reproduce “pirated” content from news organizations’ websites as teasers on their news pages.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-05 12:16

Today Wikipedia has blacked out its English language pages in protest again the proposed anti-piracy legislation in the US, which it says could "fatally damage the free and open Internet."

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA) bills that have caused the controversy are intended to stop the infringement of US copyright material by overseas websites. If passed, SOPA would give the US Justice Department and copyright holders the power to seek court orders to block search engine results or websites linking to pirated material. PIPA, due to come before the Senate on January 24th, proposes similar measures.

Wikipedia objects that the proposed laws will block entire sites unnecessarily and place the onus on site owners to police the material they link to, with damaging consequences:

"Small sites won't have sufficient resources to defend themselves. Big media companies may seek to cut off funding sources for their foreign competitors, even if copyright isn't being infringed. Foreign sites will be blacklisted, which means they won't show up in major search engines. And, SOPA and PIPA build a framework for future restrictions and suppression."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-18 15:55

Amendments tabled to the Digital Economy Bill by Lord Lucas could protect search engines from copyright liability in the United Kingdom, PressGazette reported yesterday. However, this would not apply to content on a Web site that used technology to block crawlers, such as robots.txt.

"Brilliant. Immediately all of the rows and back-and-forth between ill-advised newspapers and publishers is given a clear legal footing. It would be legal to be a search engine, and you can tell them to keep out if you wish. A few sentences saves millions of pounds of court costs and clears the headaches of everyone involved," Ian Douglas wrote for Telegraph.co.uk.
If the amendment is passed, it could make it impossible for sites that have not blocked content from search engines to sue for copyright infringement.

The bill also would allow copyright creators to re-market their content by obtaining a license to publish it themselves if the copyright owner does not offer it across formats and in all regions within two years. If it is not published at all within five years, the creator also has a right to obtain a license, as well as legally settle the dispute with a cap of £1,000 on legal expenses, according to Douglas.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-14 00:01

Google has been fined €300,000 in damages and ordered to stop digitising books in France, MediaGuardian reported today. The online giant was found to have violated copyright law by scanning books and putting excerpts online, after French publishers challenged the practice.

The La Martiniere group, which publishes Editions du Seuil SAS, asked the Paris court to fine Google €15 million. Joining them in the lawsuit was authors' group SGDL and French publishers' association SNE. Google has said it will appeal the ruling.

"French readers now face the threat of losing access to a significant body of knowledge and falling behind the rest of Internet users," Philippe Colombet, director of development for Google Books in France, told Bloomberg in an e-mailed statement. "Displaying a limited number of short extracts from books complies with copyright legislation both in France and the U.S. - and improves access to books."

However, the court stated that Google had indeed "violated author copyright laws by fully reproducing and making accessible on the site" books owned by Editions du Seuil without the publisher's permission.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-18 23:44

The senior vice president and chief legal council of Google, Inc. and the CEO of Independent News & Media, plc, today agreed to disagree on the best way to protect content owners' copyrights on the Internet. However, INM's Gavin O'Reilly and Google's David Drummond did tell the audience of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad they would continue meeting in the future to try and solve the issue.

O'Reilly argued that the current Robots Exclusion Protocol, or robots.txt, is outdated, saying publishers "need something more than essentially a binary 'yes/no' for the management and commercial exploitation of our valuable content." The answer, he said, is an updated standard like the Automated Content Access Protocol, an effort backed by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers that seeks to give publishers a better way to control their copyrighted content online.

Drummond, left, discusses copyright protection on the Web with O'Reilly, left. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

ACAP may or may not be the right technical answer for the Web, but if nothing else, it sets up a starting point. It's something that should be welcomed by the content aggregators," O'Reilly said.

Drummond said robots.txt is honoured by all legitimate search engines, and gives publishers tremendous control over how content is shown in searches

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 01:46

Google announced on Wednesday it will buy the Web fraud prevention reCaptcha, the programme the shows puzzles to Internet users before they are able to register with sites or make online purchases, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

ReCaptcha's technology defies spammers and prevents unauthorised use of copyrighted works. The system also uses scanned copies of newspaper and books that are difficult for computers to replicate to create a capitcha, a programme that generates tests humans can pass, but current computer programmes cannot.
According to the Financial Times, the acquisition serves two purposes: increasing the company's online security products as well as helping Google digitise newspapers and books.

"The words in many of the captchas provided by reCaptcha come from scanned archival newspapers and old books," said Luis von Ahn, co-founder of reCaptcha, and Will Cathcart, Google product manager, in a blog post. "Computers find it hard to recognise these words because the ink and paper have degraded over time, but by typing them in as a captcha, crowds teach computers to read the scanned text."

reCaptcha's technology is used by more than 100,000 Web sites to prevent spam and fraud.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-17 20:49

On Thursday APN News & Media Ltd. Chief Executive Brendan Hopkins called for newspapers to charge for online use of their content, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Thursday.

The head of Australia's largest regional newspaper publisher singled out the use of the papers' product by search engines such as Google and Yahoo as a place to find profit.
Hopkins said the key to transitioning to a pay-per-view model is high quality, unique journalism that consumers are willing to pay for.

"As an industry we must strive to protect our content from those who contribute nothing to its creation and are happy to run on its coat tails," Hopkins t.

He also specifically accused search engines of devaluing the content offered by newspapers' Web sites, telling the Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers' Association (PANPA) conference in Sydney that newspapers' relationships with search engines should be more like the relationship the music industry has with them. Hopkins used the recent agreement between Google and the music industry's Performing Rights Society as an example of successful online use of copyright content, which will see the Google-owned YouTube pay for the use of music videos.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-10 19:35

A group of Europe's top newspaper and magazine publishers on Thursday made a communal plea to the European Commission to strengthen copyright protection of their original content, The New York Times reported Friday.

The letter to Viviane Reding, the European media and telecommunications commissioner, appealed for help in preventing the secondary dissemination of works by online news aggregators. The publishers labelled this as the barrier to the successful generation of online revenue.

"Numerous providers are using the work of authors, publishers and broadcasters without paying for it," the letter stated. "Over the long term, this threatens the production of high-quality content and the existence of independent journalism."

The petition began in Germany, where Axel Springer, the publisher of tabloid Bild, has campaigned for stronger copyright law within the European Union's largest nation. German publishers seek "neighboring right for publishers," legal protection that would give publishers similar control over use that is already accorded to music publishers and other content owners.

Heidi Lambert, a spokeswoman for the European Publishers Council, a trade group that has endorsed the petition, said publishers also want existing legislation to be enforced more rigorously, according to The Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-13 17:28

Federal appellate judge Richard Posner has advocated expanded copyright protection to ensure the future of journalism the Daily Online Examiner reported.

Posner's proposed modifications to copyright law would make news aggregation more difficult for sites such as Google that link to news stories without the consent of the owner of the content.

While news aggregation has been identified an important problem facing the newspaper industry and its survival, the idea of copyrighting and protecting information remains vague and controversial. In an article on TechDirt.com, Mike Masnick accuses Posner of forgetting "the downsides to greater IP protectionism" writing that he "seems to ignore it completely, while also brushing off the ability of other sources of information to step into the void created by newspapers."

The Examiner's article echoes these sentiments, stating "the prospect that one publication could have exclusive rights to publish facts it uncovered is also at odds with free speech principles."

In a post on his blog Posner maintains that expanded copyright protection "might be necessary to keep free riding on content financed by online newspapers from so impairing the incentive to create costly news-gathering operations."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-02 12:06

As the bottom has progressively fallen out of print advertising and the economic downturn has left publishers in many parts of the world parched of advertising income, original sources have become increasingly skeptical of giving up their content for free. Many argue that publishers' reliance on advertising online, while not making users pay for content, is flawed, and has sacrificed the perceived value of quality content.

Yet those across the publishing industry are looking for solutions, and two separate initiatives have taken complimentary approaches to the now crucial promotion and defense of the value of online publications. The first, a work in progress, is an attempt to generate circulation revenue from online subscriptions. The second defines a group of communication standards for publishers and authors that attempts to translate the use rights of copyright law onto the Internet. Both aim to give publications an opportunity to defend their content while also creating and marketing a valuable product.

Steven Brill (left), of Journalism Online, and Mark Bide, of ACAP

Paying for content

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 19:33

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