Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


content model

Dylan Stableford is the latest in a series [1,2,3] of media commentators to speak out against the booming "content farming" industry. In a two-page tirade on The Wrap, mediabistro.com's former managing editor demonizes Associated Content (purchased by Yahoo! for US$100 million), producer of more than 4,000 video clips and articles per day, Demand Media (planning an IPO at approximately $1.5 billion) and AOL's young entrant to the business, Seed.

Slate Magazine's Farhad Manjoo sums up the perspective of many journalists: "Associated Content stands as a cautionary tale for anyone looking to do news by the numbers. It is a wasteland of bad writing, uninformed commentary, and the sort of comically dull recitation of the news you'd get from a second grader."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-07 21:52

Following the revamp of Reuters' U.S. Web site in December last year with a cleaner, more advertiser friendly look, the news wire is set to restructure its free, open UK news site along similar lines, paidContent reported.

Reuters.co.uk is significantly dependent on advertising revenue, unlike many of its services that target business professionals with premium pricing. The redesigned advertiser friendly UK site plans to launch this week, and it is likely certain content elements will become paid, MediaWeek reported.

Having revamped its commercial operations over the last six to seven months and making some significant hirings during the period, "We started to organise the site around topics. By topics, you can create topics of advertiser interest - whether broad topics like foreign currency exchanges or narrow topics around the small business environment," Tim Faircliff, consumer media general manager of Thomson Reuters, told paidContent.

While maintaining current free news offerings and without ruling out the future possibilities of a paid model, Faircliff explained Reuters is "moving in to the ad-supported model with a nod to the fact that paid is part of the DNA of our organisation," according to paidContent. "We think it's sensible that you can pay for niche, high-value content."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-20 19:14

Live-blogging technology company CoveritLive on Tuesday will launch a new version of its software that will allow publishers to monetize live-blogging content. The provider's software is already used by many UK news organisations, and the new version, CiL Premium, will target larger news organisations, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Earlier this month, the Northampton Chronicle and Echo used CoveritLive to run a day-long reader discussion, and regularly uses it to cover sporting events, such as away games of local teams.

CiL Premium will give publishers an option to share ad revenue with CoveritLive, instead of paying for the software. Ads can be placed within the live-blog. However, publishers can opt for no advertising by paying a monthly subscription fee.

To take advantage of the revenue share feature, larger publishing groups need to apply online to qualify. The company is currently seeking publishers who have "run reasonably high volumes of readership," according to an announcement from Keith McSpurren, president of CoveritLive. However, 2010 foresees expansion in availability of revenue-sharing deals to other organisations as well.

Smaller users can try the CiL Basic edition, without advertising, for free.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-12 21:31

The Wall Street Journal pointed out today that newspapers are reaching the end of costs they can cut, and need to see increases in ad revenue. However, ad revenues continue to decline or merely stabilise, and Wachovia analyst told the WSJ that "it's increasingly likely that expense cuts, while significant, won't be enough to drive upside earnings."

So what are newspapers to do? Experts are increasingly recommending newspapers find many smaller revenue streams instead of counting on one large revenue stream to come back. These can include charging for premium content, as the Economist or Wall Street Journal does; developing niche print and online products like the Bakersfield Californian's Bakotopia or getting help from non-profit content providers, like ProPublica or Associated Reporters Abroad.

Another revenue stream newspapers are missing is e-mail, ClickZ reported in May. According to A Borrell Associates report, the e-mail market reached US$12.1 billion, but only a small portion of that, $848 million, is local - prime real estate for the newspaper industry.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-04 16:02

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