Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Canada

Comments made by Conrad Black, one time head of Hollinger International Inc., on the untapped potential of Canadian news titles have prompted speculation that the former media magnate may be considering a return to the newspaper industry.

During a meeting of the editorial board at Huffington Post Canada, Black remarked that “[t]here is a great premium to be placed on the editorial function and on the goodwill of a famous trademark like a respected newspaper.” He went on to add that he could be interested by a “good title that’s grossly under-priced.” The current state of Canada’s news press could see Black presented with just such a low-cost opportunity in the near future. One of Canada’s largest news companies, Postmedia Network Canada Corp. has been forced to respond to declining ad revenue and debts of $516 million (CAD) with radical efficiency restructuring, involving job cuts and the cancellation of Sunday print editions in certain areas.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-31 16:50

Sympathy mingled with ire on Twitter yesterday as Canadians reacted to a fresh set of cuts announced by Postmedia Network, the country’s largest newspaper chain.

In a memo from CEO Paul Godfrey to employees released Monday afternoon, the company declared plans to shut down the Sunday editions of three urban dailies — the Ottawa Citizen, the Edmonton Journal and the Calgary Herald — to stop printing its country-wide title, the National Post, on Mondays for the fourth summer in a row (a tactic that Godfrey hinted in an interview with rival national daily The Globe and Mail might be extended throughout the year) and to cease publication on public holidays.

Journalists across the country are grimly waiting to be hit by a renewed surge of layoffs, coming less than a month after the company slashed 25 of 58 posts in its Postmedia News division. “Some roles across our operations will be eliminated,” confirmed Monday’s memo. The Globe and Mail reported that internal memos from the company's Ottawa and Montreal newsrooms indicated that each would lose approximately around 20% of their journalists, but that the total number was yet unknown.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-29 16:48

Postmedia Network Inc, which bought Canwest's newspaper division in July for US$1.1 billion, reported a 23 percent increase in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year that ended up on August 31, the Calgary Herald revealed Monday. Revenue totalled C$241.3 million, 1.5 percent higher than the C$237.7 million reported by Canwest in 2009.

The growth was led by a 7 percent increase in digital revenue and a 2 percent in print advertising, the company explained in a press release. However, it reported losses of C$44.6 millions.

Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said the company will remain privately owned until the half of 2011. Photo: the National Post

The results included both Canwest and Postmedia's financials, as the media group bought the 11 national dailies and 35 community newspapers six weeks before the end of the fiscal year, The Globe and Mail pointed out.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-17 21:48

At least 42 employees of the Ottawa Citizen, a former Canwest's newspaper bought by Postmedia Network in July, have accepted voluntary buyouts as part of its restructuring plan, ctvottawa.ca reported Friday.

The president of the Ottawa Newspaper Guild Lois Kirkup said that 10 editorial staffers took the offer, according to CBC News. The other 32 employees are part of the advertising, sales and finance department.

The buyouts were offered in September through out Postmedia newspapers as a way to cut costs. According to media reports, the buyout package includes six weeks' pay per year of service up to a maximum of C$150,000.

Layoffs have been reported at Edmonton Journal and the Calgary Herald. The idea, Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said back in September, will be refocus the publications towards "the digital future," CBC News informed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-02 16:20

Dailies still remain a "vital source of news, information and entertainment for consumers in seven of Canada's largest and most competitive markets," according to the latest NADbank Readership Study, released by Newspaper Audience Databank, principal research arm of the Canadian daily newspaper industry.

The study, conducted from fall 2009 to spring 2010 in markets including million-plus markets, such as Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Ottawa-Gatineau, Calgary, Edmonton, as well as Halifax, found that readership of daily papers, either print editions or web sites, remain stable in all these markets, Editor & Publisher reported.

Among the million-plus markets, 76 percent of people in Toronto over 18 read either a daily newspaper in print or online each week. The figures were even higher in other markets: 77 percent in Montréal, 78 percent in Calgary and Edmonton, and 79 percent in Vancouver and Ottawa-Gatineau.

Online readership reached 30 percent in Ottawa-Gatineau, followed by 25 percent in Toronto and Calgary.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-08 22:47

Canada's National Post offered voluntary buyouts to its entire staff as part of its Postmedia Network Inc. restructuring plan. The employees have until Friday to accept the proposal, which includes three weeks of pay for each year on the job up to a maximum of C$125,000, The Globe and Mail informed yesterday.

"It's a decision at the local level, so National Post management developed a voluntary buyout program for their operation," Postmedia's director of communications Phyllise Gelfand said to Reuters.

Postmedia bought Canwest's newspaper division in July after the media group filed for bankruptcy. However, two weeks ago, the publisher announced a reduction of the staff in all its titles as a way to cut costs. So far, 50 workers have been laid off.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-15 19:24

Canadian Metro websites, Journalmetro.com and metronews.ca, will be integrating "Add to Foursquare" buttons on their website, Newspaper Innovation reported today.

The newspaper partnered with Foursquare earlier this year and began offering location-based restaurant tips to its followers.

Through addition of this new feature on the news site, users can add a visit to a location as a "to do" in their Foursquare account and either link back to the full article or post a review on the Metro website.

Hoping to enhance its brand image, the free commuter daily also recently unveiled a "radically redesigned newspaper" for its readers in Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.

The button will be placed adjacent to the venue-targeted editorial content like restaurant reviews.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-01 15:07

Postmedia Network Inc., which recently purchased Canwest's newspaper division, said the dailies' revenue had increased by 1 percent to 259.2 million dollars in the third quarter of the fiscal year, the Winnipeg Free Press reported yesterday.

The company's good results are due to an overall 2 percent growth in advertising revenue. The gains were registered despite the continued losses of classified, retail and insert ads, The Toronto Star informed.

However, the newspaper ad increase offset a decline of 16 percent in digital media revenue, partly related "to a change in allocation between reporting segments," Editor and Publisher explained.

The newspaper chain, which has 11 dailies and 26 community newspapers in Canada, also reported a 2 percent circulation decline.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-23 18:13

OpenFile, a Toronto based news site, is attempting to reinvent the online news industry through open source citizen journalism, PBS reports.

According to OpenFile's website, the group's aim is to create a "vibrant, ever-evolving local news conversation among newsmakers, news-gatherers and news readers." Launched on May 11, the Web site is led by former CBC, CTV and CNN journalist Wilf Dinnick, and has received startup funding from a private venture capitalist. After three years, the site will be supported through ad revenue.

Local readers pitch stories ideas to an editor, who then assigns a story to a hired journalist. Craig Silverman, the digital journalism director, told the Neiman Lab that each reporter is meant to steward and respond to community comments about the file, add links and content, and generally "add a layer of reporting to what's already there."

Dinnick commented that "What we made clear in the beginning is that there are aggregators, and then there are online properties that create content. And that costs money. You have to pay journalists. No two ways about it."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-18 12:20

The (Colorado Springs, United States) Gazette shed 11 more workers Friday, the Denver Post reported today. This round of layoffs, which hit the newsroom hardest with seven from editorial positions, brings the total staff of the Colorado daily under 300.

The Gazette is owned by Freedom Communications Inc., based in Irvine, Calif., according to 5280 Magazine. Freedom filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors in September, as 5280 then reported.

Weekday subscriptions from April through September at The Gazette were down 7.8 percent as compared to the same period last year, The Gazette Friday reported.

Tellingly, The Gazette is one of 13 major U.S. newspapers not seeking credentials for engaging in live coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics set for Vancouver, Canada, Sports Business Journal yesterday reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 16:07

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