Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


business model

Future news markets, or the "New News Organisation," will be made up of hyperlocal, local news networks and publicly supported journalism, Jeff Jarvis and Steve Shepard, of the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, told the Aspen Institute's Forum on Communication and Society earlier this year.

Judy Sims, who most recently worked as the Toronto Star Media Group's vice president of digital media, agrees, pointing out that "it's local newspapers that are best positioned" to form the New News Organisation.

"Why? Two words: local advertisers. For small businesses, advertising is, was and always will be about return on investment. If the cash register doesn't ring, the model won't work. And metro newspapers know, understand and are trusted by local advertisers more than anyone else in their markets. For now anyway," Sims wrote in an article for paidContent today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-25 18:39

Nearly half of North American editors surveyed doubt that requiring payment for online content is the answer to the news media's current fiscal crisis, Spanish blogger Juan Varela reported Wednesday at soitu.es. Varela's article summarises findings announced this week at the Newsmedia Economic Action Plan Conference held in Reston, Virginia, United States.

The study, conducted by the American Press Institute in cooperation with Belden Interactive, reiterates that dailies are too distant from readers as well as being too paper-reliant. API does not envision "paid content as the one source that will save journalism."

Rather, it urges a five-point plan developed at this year's Newspaper Association of America conference held in January. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-17 19:03

Specialising in target marketing and social media, the Sacramento Press retains advertisers at a rate that may have made it the envy of its hometown neighbour, the troubled McClatchy Newspapers, Inc. Now, the 14-member news outlet wants to replicate its success in other cities across the United States.

"In hyperbolical and citizen journalism, it's exciting to see successes on the business side," co-founder Ben Ifeld told Mark Briggs, staff blogger for Journalism 2.0. "You need local ownership to make it work. But if we can provide a business model and revenue channels and a technology platform, then it can work in other places."

Not everyone experienced in the genre is as hopeful - at least not under the current economic climate.

"As a start-up veteran and someone who doesn't have to fill a blog with words every day to stay viable, I have sad new[s] for the trend-seers," Mike Orren, founding and former publisher of Pegasus News, wrote on his Web site, orrenmedia.com. "If you look for trends in the fortunes of start-ups, you'll miss the mark, at best. At worst, someone will listen to you."

Orren suggests that fiscal success in the micro-news business demands unwavering focus on the following three principles:

    - Data is as important as news;

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-17 18:25

Elauwit Media, the publisher of The Sun and Telegram newspapers in Philadelphia, was the fastest growing newspaper publisher in the U.S., according to an Inc. magazine list of the country's fastest growing businesses, The Marlton Telegram reported last week.

The media company sat at 1,577 out of the 5,000 companies listed, 48th in the Philadelphia region and 20th in media company ranks. Elauwit was the only newspaper publisher to enter the media company top 20.

Elauwit recorded revenue growth of around 203 percent over the three-year period ending in 2008, with $2.4 million revenue for 2008.

"Our business model is unique to the industry - and so are the results we deliver for our advertisers. We are successful because they are successful," said Dan McDonough Jr., president and publisher, according to the Marlton Telegram.

The company has worked successfully under its Strategically Targeted Online Marketing Program, or STOMP, started earlier this year. The programme seeks to find the maximum return for a businesses online marketing plan.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-28 16:17

Media conglomerate News Corporation has recently been in talks with publishers about forming a news consortium to better enable the group to charge for news on both online and mobile devices, the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.

Thanks to its success with its partly paid, partly ad supported Wall Street Journal Online, News Corp. is "a logical leader" to expand that model elsewhere, according to the Times. Chief Digital Officer Jonathan Miller is "believed to have met" with publishers from Hearst Corp., the Washington Post Co., the New York Times Co. and Tribune Co., according to the Times, a Tribune-owned paper.

Earlier this month, News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch announced all the media giant's news Web sites will begin charging for digital content by the summer of 2010.

The All Things Digital blog, part of the Wall Street Journal Digital Network, owned by News Corp., pointed out that the biggest problem publishers face when switching to paid content is that "a great deal of the stuff we make can be found all over the Web, with little to distinguish it, and the model that used to support this content-near-monopolies on eyeballs and ad dollars-has disappeared. Pay wall or no, that's going to have change going forward."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-25 15:55

The Daily News Transcript, serving the Norwood and Dedham communities in Massachusetts, will now serve the areas individually with a new Dedham weekly newspaper and a larger Norwood weekly, the News Transcript announced on its Web site Thursday. Parent company Gatehouse Media said the move will give the communities more thorough and extensive coverage.

The last issue of the Daily News Transcript is set for Friday September 25, from which The Dedham Transcript and the newly titled Norwood Transcript & Bulletin will begin publishing on October 1.
"For the past 36 years, our local staff has worked hard to bring you the best possible local daily newspaper, but we believe it's time to take the paper back to its weekly roots and focus our coverage more deeply on your town," wrote Publisher Greg Reibman.

Richard Daniels, president and chief executive officer of GateHouse Media, New England, said that due to the paper's companion Wicked Local Web sites, focusing on the communities separately in print will enable "even greater depth, and reach far more readers and viewers than ever before."

While the communities will see a physical copy of the newspaper once a week, local news and columns will be updated daily on the respective Web sites.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-21 16:24

California's oldest Japanese-American community newspaper may be rescued by a group of community leaders who are trying to turn it into a non-profit organisation, the San Francisco Chronicle reported Thursday.

The board of directors of the Nichi Bei Times on Thursday announced the 63-year-old newspaper would print its last edition Sept. 10.

The paper, with around 8,000 subscribers, first encountered circulation and advertising decline in 2006, where a new three-day a week, with one edition in English, format was substituted for the daily bi-lingual design in an attempt to turn the papers fortune.

Board Chariman Ken Abiko told the Chronicle that the new format was given three years to see if it would work, but "the losses were deepening and there was no sense in continuing. It was either now or soon."

The paper's predecessor, Nichi Bei Shimbun, was founded in 1899 by Akibo's grandfather.

However, a group of local journalists and community leaders have refused to let the newspaper die, and instead is creating a non-profit operation, called the Nichi Bei Foundation. The group hopes to be supported by grants, donations and fundraisers, according to the Chronicle.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-21 16:20

Attributor, a start-up that offers ad revenue sharing services to newspapers and blogs, "wants to bring the ad networks into the mix, to allow them to be the revenue distributor that looks not only at the site that offered up the news story but also the news outlet that created the story," ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz commented in his blog.

Diaz applauds the start-up's business model, saying the proactive approach to generating revenue from news aggregation is sorely lacking amongst newspaper executives who, according to Diaz, "knew only one way to respond: cry foul" when they saw their old business models being challenged.
Ultimately, Diaz writes that Attributor offers as "a smart idea that could be part of the overall transformation" of the new business models for newspapers, which must find a way to turn a profit from their aggregated content.

The New York Times referred to Attributor as "more carrot than stick." Although the start-up's plan faces legal obstacles, it has received the attention of The New York Times Co., the Washington Post Co., Hearst, MediaNews Group, Reuters, McClatchy and Conde Nast.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 00:40

In a recent New York Times technology article, Saul Hansell analyses the unlikely success of online video site Hulu. Hansell attributes the site's healthy growth and survival amidst the global economic crisis to the fact that the site takes advantage of a gap in the market that is not covered by YouTube or any other video site, as it offers network television series on the Web, as opposed to user-generated content.

Hulu is also interesting to networks because it offers a secondary portal to their content, aside from their main site.

"Hulu has proved that there is value in having a portal for video," Hansell wrote, making the video site an impressive business model and an interesting option for television networks.

Founded in March 2007, Hulu doesn't "have a weak spot that could be exploited by a newcomer, as Kazaa and Skype did in their industries," because putting TV shows on the Internet isn't disruptive. On television, TV shows are free, and paid for by ads. Online, if an ad shows up in television video, it's nothing new, and therefore not disruptive, Hansell points out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-13 16:52

Much buzz has been made regarding the possibility of microblogging site Twitter eventually making a profit, but several industry professionals seem to think the outlook is bleak for the popular site.

"The microblogging site may never be able to turn a profit," Brennon Slattery wrote on his PC World blog, where he reported that at a Sun Valley, Idaho media conference hosted by Allen & Co., the hot topic was whether Twitter could generate earnings from its content. Participants in the conference seemed to believe a subscription model was the only viable source of revenue for the site.

The Associated Press, also reporting on the conference, described a panel discussion addressing the issues that could affect Twitter's profitability in which participants seemed wary of the site developing a successful business model.

"I think it's a great service. I just don't think it's a natural advertising medium," commented media executive Barry Diller.

The creators of Twitter, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, are reportedly working on a business model they have yet to unveil. The AP reported on what the model might entail, saying Williams and Stone "have suggested they might impose fees on companies interested in mining the data about consumer preferences and peeves that pour into Twitter."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-13 15:48

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