Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


business model

The Trinity Mirror will not implement a broad paywall strategy on its websites, according to Sly Bailey, chief executive of the newspaper group.

Bailey discussed the group's stance on charging for online access to content with MediaGuardian, confirming there are no plans to install a broad paywall. The group favors charging for more specific online services and products instead.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 18:04

The Financial Times confirmed yesterday that payment for its day and weekly passes for its online content will go through PayPal, the e-commerce business owned by eBay. The FT first announced plans of its online subscription model last August before announcing the option of a day pass last month.

Despite previous reports, the FT will not be going ahead with a "micropayment" option, a model which would allow readers to pay a small fee to access a single article online. "Micropayments simply isn't going to work if you go to an article and you spend quarter of an hour filling out forms and ticking boxes," John Ridding, CEO of the FT, told the newspaper's Digital Media & Broadcasting conference in London.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 18:02

Following last week's acquisition of government data and analysis firm Eagle Eye Publishers by Bloomberg LP, rumours that the financial news giant wants to create a Bloomberg Government business to be named "Bgov" seem to be supported, Washington Technology reported.

Bgov would likely focus on the impact of government actions on publicly traded companies. The enterprise is expected to compete with the likes of Congressional Quarterly and would also potentially compete with similar data service providers, like research firms Input and Fedsources.

This has been the company's third acquisition in the recent months, after Business Week was purchased late last year, and New Energy Finance, a UK-based green/energy publisher, paidContent reported. This news seems to back up the rumoured reports of Bloomberg's US$100 million push into government news and data. However, terms of the deal have not been disclosed by either parties.

Mark Amtower first reported the news, last Wednesday, on his Amtower B2G blog and commented that, Onvia, Federal Sources, Input, Carroll Publishing and others now have another competitor, and maybe Washington Technology and WFED will have a new advertiser.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-25 23:07

Newspapers have always been the go-to destinations for most in-depth local coverage, but with the digital revolution many fell behind in organising that hyperlocal content online. Other sources have picked up the slack, and today hyperlocal content is more valuable than ever before.

One new source is Outside.in, which is partnering with publishers to better aggregate hyperlocal content through monitoring news, blogs, Web discussions, maps and more, and to also serve targeted advertising to readers, MediaBuyerPlanner reported Tuesday. Publishers include Dow Jones Media Group, the New York Post, The Miami Herald, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and properties of the Tribune Company.

Outside.in has mapped to more than 50,000 neighborhoods in the United States, and then paired those areas accordingly with targeted advertising.

Partnering with a site like Outside.in helps publishers aggregate and categorise local news and information effectively, while also creating tailored local news sites. It also facilitates tagging news maps, social-media functions like reader comments and sharing via e-mail, and helps advertisers deliver audience-specific advertising at relatively modest prices, Media Post reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-11 23:31

McClatchy Co. will not put up paywalls, and is instead "comfortable" with an ad-supported online model, CEO Gary Pruitt announced today, MediaPost reported.

However, the U.S. newspaper publisher will continue experimenting, offering paid content relating to state government news (which will target wealthy lobbyists) at its newspaper in Raleigh, North Carolina, for example.

"If you can hold on to your audience, you can be leading local media provider in your market, even with the proliferation and fragmentation of the entire media landscape," Pruitt said at Borrell Associates' Local Online Advertising Conference, according to paidContent. "The percent of internet-only ad dollars will grow because of self-serve vehicles and classifieds. We don't need it to be 50/50 for us to have the same cash flow. Digital has a higher profit margin because of the lower costs from not having to print and distribute it compared to print."

McClatchy's newspapers include the Kansas City Star and the Miami Herald.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-09 23:30

UK publisher Pearson PLC announced Wednesday it has bought Medley Global Advisors, which advises hedge funds, investment banks and asset managers, as it aims to focus on subscriptions over advertising, Reuters reported.

Pearson, which publishes the Financial Times, is looking to diversify its business model. In 2008, it bought an online news and discussion service aimed at fund managers called Money-Media, for example. It has also bought several data providers, such as MergerMarket, to cut down on reliance on print and advertising for revenues, according to the Daily Mail.

Neither company provided details on the size of the deal. According to a statement in the Financial Times, the group said MGA specialises in macroeconomic policy commentary, particularly focusing on interest rates, money supply movements and government policy. It is believed to have "a blue-chip client base made up of major investors and policymakers."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-04 22:59

Like most content creators, the Telegraph Media Group has always focused on increasing Web traffic by directing a maximum number of users to its Web site, Telegraph.co.uk, thereby increasing digital revenues through advertising. But times are changing, online ad revenue isn't enough, and TMG has come up with a new plan.

TMG's digital editor, Edward Roussel, told MediaGuardian today that the publisher will stop chasing everyone and instead focus on the "three Cs": content, commerce and clubs, with the hope of building a more sustainable business model.

"Rather than focusing relentlessly on the aggregated numbers of unique users and page impressions, we are now looking more at channels," he told MediaGuardian's Mercedes Bunz. "Increasing the traffic in those channels, we equally drive up revenues there as well. We want to drive those areas harder to make them commercially attractive." He added that publishers can do more with clubs in which people pay for memberships.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-03 20:26

As News Corp. announced profits of US$254 million over the three months up to December, Rupert Murdoch said his company is close to implementing online subscription models for all of its newspapers like the Times, the News of the World, and the Sun.

The company is also in "advanced negotiations" with handheld-device manufacturers about possible paywalls that would allow customers access to News Corp. content "whenever and wherever they want it," said Murdoch.

According to Murdoch, "ingenious and fabulous devices" like the iPad and the Kindle "would be unloved and unsold" without the creative content supplied by newspapers. "Content is not just king, it is the emperor of all things digital. We're on the cusp of a digital revolution from which our shareholders will profit handsomely," said Murdoch.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-03 18:20

Journalism is vital to societies, and a "new technical, political and financial ecosystem" must be built to support it, the Global Agenda Council on the Future of Journalism announced last week. Even as business models falter, journalism must not, according to the council, one of the Global Agenda Councils, part of the World Economic Forum, which met in Dubai in late November.

The council believes journalism and its relationship with audiences and society in general must be reconstructed in the new media spaces. "Public engagement is transforming journalism, offering an historic opportunity to create unprecedented increased value. The media industry in general, and journalism in particular, have been experiencing drastic changes which call into question their role in mediating information to the benefit of their audience as well as disrupting traditional business models. Yet in an age when information is more important than ever, journalism is vital for building societies. It is a systemic part of the social environment. We need to build a new technical, political and financial ecosystem to support it," read the final statement of the GAC on the Future of Journalism, Wilfried Ruetten, a member of the council, posted on European Journalism Centre's Web site Friday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-23 20:49

People are willing to pay for online news, according to a recent study of 11 countries in North America, Europe and Australia, a senior manager from PricewaterhouseCoopers in the Netherlands told the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad today. When asked the question, "If there are no free alternatives, are you willing to pay for an online newspaper?" consumers said they are willing to pay 62 percent of the price of a traditional paper.

"This means there must be a possibility for newspaper companies to develop a proposition for your audience that is economically viable. Of course, if there are still free alternatives, it will be quite hard to do so. But if you have a good proposition, it certainly is possible to get paid for an online proposition," said Marieke van der Donk, senior manager of entertainment and media.

Marieke van der Donk, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

When it comes to financial news, the value proposition is even higher. The same survey found that people are willing to pay 98 percent of what they pay for a traditional paper, or 98 cents on the euro or dollar. For sports, the number is 77 percent, she said."If you have relevant premium content, and it's not available elsewhere, consumers are willing to pay for it. Our research has proven that," she said, adding that hard news is very hard to charge consumers for.

She also pointed out it is important to "have your strategy in place" and to be "very clear in your subscription model."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 07:00

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