Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


business model

The Faster Times launched last summer with a new kind of business model, The New York Times reported.

Instead of paying staffers a set amount - creator Sam Apple, a writer from New York, would pay writers 75 percent of revenues from all the ads placed alongside their articles. Fees would likely start out small, but if the publication did well, writers would gradually make an increasing amount.

The set-up was "a small experiment in capitalistic incentives: contributors would profit directly from their work, according to the market's assessment of its value," The Times article, by Andrew Rice, stated. "And therein lies the catch -- for The Faster Times, for many similar start-ups and for the entire industry of media, old and new. No one seems to know how to value the product anymore. This isn't a lament about declining standards of quality or the rude incursions of amateur bloggers. In fact, thanks to the Internet, people probably read more good journalism than ever. That's precisely the problem: the sheer volume of words has overwhelmed a business model that was once based on scarcity and limited choice."

For more on this article, visit The New York Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-13 20:03

James Fallows of the Atlantic took a look at ways in which Google is saving rather than killing the news business, writing that he is "convinced that there is a larger vision for news coming out of Google." He interviewed several Google staff for his in-depth, detailed article.

"Google's efforts to shore up news organizations are extensive and have recently become intense but are not guaranteed to succeed," wrote Fallows. He believes that Google has "undersold" its efforts in its strategy toward news companies, and that people at the top of the company have pushed hard for saving the news industry to "become an internalized part of the culture in what is arguably the world's most important media organization."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-12 22:03

The financial crisis that spurred the media crisis has left journalists, publishers, bloggers, and other media professionals on an unrelenting quest to find the a business model that meets the demands of both the digital and print worlds. As this quest continues, Peter Kirwan, writing for The Guardian's Media Blog, suggests that, at least in the digital realm, Financial Times' Web site FT.com has found the answer.

Kirwan examines what the Financial Times did over the past few years to turn itself around from a failing publication in 2002 to one of the only publications to make a profit last year while the rest of the media world seemed to fall apart. This leads the author to wonder if "the FT has unlocked the secret of eternal profitability."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-06 19:26

Le Monde announced Tuesday that, starting March 29, it will be offering a new subscription package encompassing all media on which the top French newspaper is offered. Currently, the site offers free access to much of its online content, articles from that day's print newspaper, which are relegated to a subscription-only archive the next day, and there is a free iPhone

The move comes as part of an effort to create what application, which has received over 1.4 million downloads to date. Upon the implementation of a paywall, Le Monde's print edition will no longer be available online to anyone but web subscribers.Eric Fotterino, CEO of Le Monde, calls a "global brand."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-26 18:21

Spot.Us, the California-based community-funded journalism site, is looking at new business models, it was reported in eMedia Vitals. Spot.Us allows the public to fund the stories they want: freelance journalists submit pitches or readers provide tips, a price is set for the story and Spot.Us enables the public donation process.

At the SXSW technology festival, Spot.Us founder David Cohn suggested that he was planning to offer readers alternative ways to fund stories, according to eMedia Vitals. As well as donating cash, readers could perform some kind of advertising-related task for a company such as filling out a survey, taking a quiz or watching a video, and then be awarded credits which they could put towards funding stories.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-25 22:03

Although newspaper magazines have historically been well-received by readers, Frédéric Filloux, writer of The Monday Note, believes that specialty magazines may disappear as newspapers evolve.

"From a pure editorial perspective, the "magazinification" of dailies make more sense than ever," he writes. "Breaking news and even developing stories have been captured by the web and by the mobile internet," so newspapers can offer unique content by producing more in-depth, magazine-style pieces.

For more on this story, visit our partner site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-23 18:10

ABC recently announced plans to initiate a paywall for some of its online content starting this June, hoping to alleviate some of its financial troubles and increase revenue. The announcement comes in the wake of ABC's restructuring plans and its decision to eliminate 300 to 400 jobs through buyout propositions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-17 03:42

The Financial Times plans to launch a four-part editorial series, "Deals and Dealmakers," beginning March 18, in partnership with the law firm Mishcon de Reya, MarketingWeek reported. The series is the first publishing project by FT in collaboration with a law firm.

The FT's brand diversification strategies and partnerships are being pursued in hopes they will reduce reliance on traditional display advertising, Ben Hughes, global commercial director of FT, told MarketingWeek.

After the inaugural issue, subsequent supplements will be published in June, September and December 2010. The supplements will also be available online in a special microsite that will be regularly updated, MarketingWeek reported. The site will also include print articles, videos and interactive graphics.

Online advertising initiatives targeting specific audiences will run throughout the campaign, along with a co-branded print marketing campaign in FT-Europe.

Kevin Gold, managing partner at Mishcon de Reya, said that 90 percent of the firm's revenue is from the business world.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-12 22:20

The "Year of the Paywall" is upon us and in a time where most newspapers seem to be gearing up to build one around their Web sites - The New York Times and the News Corporation Wapping publications are just a couple of examples - some executives believe there is still room for other revenue models to coexist with paid content.

The head of digital media at News Corporation, Jonathan Miller, told delegates at the Abu Dhabi Media Summit that "dual revenue streams" are likely to co-exist as media organizations try ways of making money online, according to Guardian.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-11 23:02

Newspapers must find new revenue streams outside advertising in order to survive, the CEO of Publicis told the inaugural Abud Dhabi media summit today, MediaGuardian reported.

"It is not and/or but and/and. We need to have advertising and paid content. Some part of the content could be open and others available on subscription or pay per view," said Maurice Lévy, head of the French advertising group, the third largest in the world by revenue.

Lévy also said advertisements from financial services are beginning to rebound this year, but auto ads are still struggling, BusinessWeek reported. According to ZenithOptimedia Group Ltd., which is owned by Publicis, ad spending could rise 0.9 percent to US$447.7 billion in 2010, following last year's drop of 10 percent.

The online advertising market is still growing, but this is not enough to support newspapers' costs, he said, according to MediaGuardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 00:32

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