Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


BBC

The Guardian wants to aggregate the web’s best journalism, and it wants your help,” begins Mashable’s Lauren Indvik as she reports on the newspaper’s plans to launch a “pop-up aggregator” today. The way to participate? Tweet great commentary and analysis on trending stories with the hashtag #smarttakes.

A court order has banned the BBC from broadcasting a docu-drama about last year’s London riots, the Guardian reports, and the broadcaster's lawyers are considering making a formal appeal.

The digital news payments kiosk Piano Media through which numerous Slovenian and Slovakian publishers charge for content has announced that seven publishers in Poland (who are together behind 26 national and regional newspapers, 42 websites and 11 magazines) will adopt a joint subscription system in September, Journalism.co.uk and PaidContent report.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-18 18:31

He has yet to take up his new position, but George Entwistle, the soon-to-be Director General of the BBC, already faces calls from the National Union of Journalists to rethink the corporation’s six year licence fee freeze. In 2012, out-going DG Mark Thompson agreed that the licence fee would remain fixed at £145.50 until 2017, which translates to 16% real terms cut. Terms of the agreement saw the BBC agree to fund the World Service and BBC Monitoring, which analyses media coverage from around the world. 

The NUJ publicly criticised Thompson’s handling of the licence fee agreement, writing in an email to its members: “It is our view that the BBC should have fought these plans, and rallied its supporters, rather than accept such a devastating deal which could lead to thousands of job losses and the wholesale closure of services." In the months following the deal, the journalism board responsible for the management of BBC Journalism was dissolved and 650 World Service jobs were axed. In addition, BBC Online suffered a budget decrease of 25%, bringing about the loss of 360 jobs and a reduction in the number of news blogs on the site.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 14:02

“Citizen Media is the new form of a newswire, often quicker than anything else,” said Riyaad Minty, Al Jazeera’s head of social media, in an email exchange with WAN-IFRA earlier this year.

This may be true, but dealing with content from the Internet requires high standards of authentication, and sometimes even big players mess up. During the past week, the BBC has become a case in point. It has made two mistakes with sourcing its images – one serious, one merely embarrassing.

The major error came when the BBC mistakenly used an image taken in Iraq in 2003 to accompany an online story about the recent massacre in Houla, Syria. As Poynter reports, the caption to the photo, shown on the BBC’s website, read, “this image – which cannot be independently verified – is believed to show the bodies of children in Houla awaiting burial.” The picture was credited to an anonymous “Activist.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-29 17:54

Olympic athletes are not the only ones making ambitions preparations for this summer’s games. The BBC outlined its plans for covering the Olympics in a statement yesterday, promising to provide 2,500 hours of live Olympic coverage, up from the 1,500 hours that the BBC produced at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

“We will be bringing live coverage of every Olympic Sport from every venue, both through a combination of BBC One and BBC Three and up to 24 simultaneous streams live online on PC, mobile, tablet or connected TV. These services will be complemented by coverage on Radio 5 live, mobile and tablet, while the majority of cable and satellite viewers will be able to access the 24 channels on their providers’ platform through the BBC Red Button,” said Roger Mosey, BBC director of London 2012.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 14:59

The BBC was criticised by a committee of MPs yesterday for being “unambitious” in its plans to boost revenue as it makes cuts to its budget.

The Guardian reported that the public accounts committee had questioned the BBC’s plans to generate just an extra £40 million per year from BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the broadcaster.

"If the target remains unchanged, the Trust should provide us with a clear explanation of why £40m is the tipping point, beyond which further rises would distort the market or be over ambitious," says the report.

The report also stated, "The BBC's plans for increasing commercial income, from £280m to £320m a year by 2016-17, are unambitious in the context of the financial pressures it faces."

Committee member Richard Bacon implied that the BBC relied too much on outside forces to ensure that it was operating as efficiently as possible. “It took the pressure of a licence fee settlement to force the BBC into setting a target of 3% annual savings, which it is comfortably on track to achieve. The BBC's assumptions about what it could deliver were unambitious," he said.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-07 18:51

In July last year, Lord Chris Patten, Chairman of the BBC Trust said that high senior management pay was "one of the most toxic reasons for the public's lack of sympathy for the BBC".

Today it's clear that his concerns have been taken head on, as The Guardian reports that the BBC actually exceeded its 2009 target to cut its top management bill by 25% and its number of managers by 20%.

The BBC has slashed the amount it pays for senior managers by 27%, and the actual number of those managers by 24%.

The deadline for the savings was originally set for 2013, but it was later brought forward to the end of 2011.

The cuts bring the number of senior managers down to 484 as of December 31 2011, compared to 640 in 2009, reports Digital Spy.

According to the BBC's website, it anticipates making savings beyond its original objectives in other areas as well. The broadcaster writes that of a planned £2bn of savings between 2007 and 2012/13, "we have already delivered £1bn of savings in the first three years and are on course to exceed our targets."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-12 18:53

Business executives in Europe are increasingly getting their news from Internet, according to the latest Business Elite Europe survey from Ipsos MediaCT, Journalism.co.uk reported. And Google News is the most popular destination.

Although 95 percent of the senior business executives read newspapers everyday, 72 percent said they also visit websites on a monthly basis to get information. This represents a 63 percent increase since 2008, MarketingWeek revealed.

"Instead of replacing other media, digital supplements their use of print and television. Europe's business leaders require as much information from as many different sources as possible," director at Ipsos MediaCT James Torr told Journalism.co.uk.

The poll showed that Google News is preferred by 30 percent he 453,353 business executives surveyed, followed by sites of the BBC (22.7 percent), The Financial Times (15.4 percent), CNN (9.6 percent) and Sky News with (9.4 percent).

Among the newspapers, The Wall Street Journal Europe leads the way with 34 percent of readership, even though its website was only visited by 3.8 percent of the businessmen, Media Week informed. The survey included information gathered from 453,353 business executives in 17 European countries.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-21 23:04

The BBC launched its new news website yesterday: the biggest redesign of the site since 2003. As well as navigational and layout changes, improved video and sharing capabilities, the BBC has created a new North American edition of the site, BBC.com (as opposed to BBC.co.uk.)

A new dedicated website team based in the BBC's Washington DC office will be "making sure that a new, North America edition front page reflects the stories, themes and issues which matter most to our users in the US and Canada," according to an article by the news website editor Steve Herrmann and the editor of the North America edition Matt Davis.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-15 19:09

Thanks to its commercial division, which produces TV programmes such as Doctor Who and The Office, BBC Worldwide hit record profits of about £140 million for 2009/10, MediaGuardian reported.

BBC Magazines, also part of the group's commercial division, is selling one million copies a week of its Radio Times. Meanwhile, licensing of brands to toy-makers, as well as producing U.S. television hit Dancing with the Stars, and owning TV channels like BBC America, are all causes for record profits. Versions of Dancing with the Stars (known in Britain as Strictly Come Dancing) has been sold to 30 countries, and versions of The Weakest Link are shown in 60 countries worldwide.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-24 20:15

The BBC is considering selling BBC Worldwide, the corporation's commercial arm, The Times reports.

According to a Worldwide spokesman, the BBC Worldwide's staff was told on Friday that the BBC is "seeking a partnership with another company" to enable its titles, which include Top Gear, Radio Times and Gardener's World, to meet their potential, "while still protecting the BBC's editorial standards and brands."

Digital Spy notes this commercial partnership agreement would have "mixed" results, with some titles being sold and others merely licensed.

Back in December 2009, the Guardian reported the British government had included BBC Worldwide in the portfolio of assets it was considering selling, and urged the corporation to "look more widely at the options for greater financial and operational separation, including a sale or partial sale." The BBC replied that the division was "not up for sale," although it would continue "to keep an open mind about the appropriate ownership structure."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-15 01:35

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation