Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Apps

The BBC will launch a trio of iPhone applications in April, aiming to replicate users' online experience on the mobile platform, Times Online reported. The app will be free of charge.

The mobile apps will be based on the broadcaster's news, sport and iPlayer video services. Because the BBC app will be free, analysts say it will "increase tension with companies looking to offer paid-for content," according to the Times Online.

Following Google, the BBC has the second-most popular Web site in the United Kingdom.

Following the iPhone app launch, the BBC will also launch BlackBerry, Android and apps for other devices, aiming to be "platform neutral," Erik Huggers, head of future media and technology, told the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona last week, according to Silicon.com.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-19 17:36

The London Evening Standard will launch a mobile application later this month, aiming to connect its content with social media, Media Guardian reported today. The newspaper's print version is also now being sold again, after dropping its cover price in October.

The new mobile app will be available later this month across all major smartphone platforms, according to a press release from Handmark, the company that built the app. However, no detail was provided as to whether the app will be paid, or supported by advertising. It will deliver the newspaper in a simple, easy-to-navigate format and the "content within the mobile application will be refreshed automatically and available for offline reading."

"Our goal is to deliver our readers a quality extension to their reading experience when they don't have immediate access to the paper or the London Evening Standard Web site," Tim Smith, general manager of digital at the Evening Standard, stated in the press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-16 00:26

Live-blogging technology company CoveritLive on Tuesday will launch a new version of its software that will allow publishers to monetize live-blogging content. The provider's software is already used by many UK news organisations, and the new version, CiL Premium, will target larger news organisations, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Earlier this month, the Northampton Chronicle and Echo used CoveritLive to run a day-long reader discussion, and regularly uses it to cover sporting events, such as away games of local teams.

CiL Premium will give publishers an option to share ad revenue with CoveritLive, instead of paying for the software. Ads can be placed within the live-blog. However, publishers can opt for no advertising by paying a monthly subscription fee.

To take advantage of the revenue share feature, larger publishing groups need to apply online to qualify. The company is currently seeking publishers who have "run reasonably high volumes of readership," according to an announcement from Keith McSpurren, president of CoveritLive. However, 2010 foresees expansion in availability of revenue-sharing deals to other organisations as well.

Smaller users can try the CiL Basic edition, without advertising, for free.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-12 21:31

Building a great system takes time, which is why The New York Times isn't in a hurry to launch its metered paywall this year, President and CEO Janet Robinson said in an earnings call today, paidContent reported.

The new system will "keep us connected to search driven Web" by being flexible between paid and free content, she said.

In the mobile arena, The Times' free iPhone app reached 3 million downloads since it was launched in July 2008, according to MocoNews. In December, it had 75 million mobile pageviews, Robinson said.

It also has paid apps. Its iPhone Crossword app which has a tiered pricing structure: 30 day subscription for US$1.99, six months for $9.99 or a yearly subscription for $16.99. The newspaper's BlackBerry Sudoku app and Crossword app both cost $2.99.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 00:25

According to a report by business research firm Gartner, sales of mobile phone applications are predicted to raise more than US$6 billion in 2010, CMSWire wrote Tuesday. By 2013, the figure is expected to reach US$29 billion. This year, an estimated 4,500 applications may be downloaded, compared to 2,500 in 2009.

UK newspaper The Guardian announced that it sold 68,979 copies of its premium iPhone application that it launched in December. Each one costs around US$3.99, which amounts to about US$275,000 so far. The outlet can earn up to US$3.2 million per year, according to CMSWire.

Even though a number of newspapers are starting to charge for online content, an Adweek Media/Harris poll revealed that the model "seems unlikely to work" since 77 percent of adults said they would refuse to pay for a news site's content. One out of five adults said they would pay between US$1 and US$10 per month while only 5 percent said they would pay more than US$10 per month, according to the study.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-22 16:16

Income from iPhone apps is nothing to scoff at. The Guardian's app costs £2.39, and the UK newspaper announced it has sold almost 69,000 app downloads since the app's launch in December. At that rate, income from the app alone could reach £1.97 million a year, paidContent reported today.

In the first 48 hours after launching the app, the Guardian made £20,000. It is currently listed in the top 10 news apps on Apple's Web site. However, Apple does get a 30 percent commission, and these figures are before that commission is taken, paidContent pointed out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-14 19:01

Google may be launching its Chrome OS-based netbook by the holiday season in 2010, IBTimes reported Sunday. The search engine company has already contacted numerous hardware manufacturers and sent out RFPs (Request for Proposal), according to the report. The device is predicted to cost under US$300 (€210) and will be sold directly by Google.

According to The Link, using Chrome for netbooks means building an open-source OS (Operating System) that will permit developers to build directly on top of the system and drop the licensing fee that Microsoft entails, thus making the netbooks 10 percent less expensive. The project may take away from the significant share of the OS market that Microsoft has. IBTimes added that the netbook is rumoured to have "pre-installed" Google apps like Google Maps, Gmail, Google Docs, Google Calendar and Google Search by Voice. Physical features are also believed to include a chipset from Nvidia's Tegra line, an ARM CPU, 10.1 inch TFT HD-ready multi-touch display, 64GB SSD, 2GB RAM, WiFi, 3G, Bluetooth, Ethernet port, USB ports, webcam, 3.5mm audio jack, multi-card reader and others.

Chrome OS for netbooks may also transform netbooks into Internet-based machines since the focus will be on Web-based applications, The Link writes. In countries like the United States, the company may team up with network operators to provide the netbook as part of a 3G package, IBTimes speculates.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-30 16:07

Daily Mail & General Trust is setting its sights on being "the leading mobile publisher of applications in Europe," and to that end, will launch at least 15 new Apple iTunes applications over the next six months, Richard Titus, chief executive of Associates Northcliffe Digital (DMGT's digital division) announced.

The first half of the applications are expected to be launched early in 2010, including apps for Metro.co.uk, Mail Online, Motors.co.uk, Jobsite, Teletext Holidays, Findaproperty.com, This is and Local people, The Financial Times reported today.

However, Guardian.co.uk, Telegraph.co.uk, Independent.co.uk and some regional titles already have iPhone apps, paidContent UK's Patrick Smith pointed out today, asking why news publishers are "so keen on smartphone users downloading bits of software when there's a perfectly good Internet out there that displays everyone's content available to everyone? It's got a lot to do with marketing..."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-16 19:34

The Guardian has launched a paid-for iPhone application, the paper reported, hoping to develop "the world's best content-based iPhone experience."

Key themes in the development were "speed, customisation, a great design aesthetic and ease of navigation through the full breadth of Guardian content," according to a blog post by mobile product manager Jonathon Moore. The app will refresh content every 15 minutes, and offline browsing will be possible. Content is organised by keyword, and users can customise their home page. As yet there is no video and no option to comment or read comments of others.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 17:54

Flurry, a mobile application analyst reports that in its most recent study of user retention across 19 categories over a 90-day period, news and reference apps enjoyed the most staying power and frequency of visits.

Social media monitor Mashable observed in response to Flurry's findings that though silly apps might have the most initial downloads, they are also rather easily uninstalled. As such, the silly may win the battle, while news could wind up winning the war.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-09 20:10

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