Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


apple

Amid far higher demand for its newest concoction iPad, Apple has announced it is delaying the device's delivery worldwide, PC World reported today. Heightened demand is thought to continue to be larger than the corporation's supply "over the next several weeks," Information Week wrote.

Due to a "surprisingly strong" demand from the United States, Apple is shifting the international launch to the end of May, Information Week said. It will be regulating international pricing and registering global pre-orders on May 10.

"The sales figures show there is an appetite for a touchscreen device, but the longer they leave it the more chance other manufacturers have of getting in on the game," said Stuart Miles, who operates tech site Pocket-lint, In The News reported.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-14 19:42

German tech corporation Neofonie GmbH announced the launch of an iPad "rival," The Associated Press reported yesterday. The WePad might be better, the corporation claims, because of its larger screen as well as USB ports to connect exterior devices.

Neofonie mentioned that the machine might interest publishers because it would permit them to sell content without forcing a customer relationship (like Apple's iTunes or Amazon's Kindle do) so as to preserve the "simple content supplier" status, the AP wrote.

The WePad is extensible as well as open, since its Linux alternative is compatible with Flash and Java while its "meta-store" allows access to Android Marketplace and other application stores, paidContent reported today. Gadgetvenue.com disclosed that the device will operate on Google's Android operating system.

Neofonie will include its digital newspaper WeMagazine and a magazine platform. German magazine publisher Gruner & Jahr hopes to feature its titles on the WePad and conversations are underway between Neofonie and prominent German publishing group Axel Springer, paidContent added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-13 17:15

The launch of Apple's iAd application may help newspaper organisations tap into the rapidly developing iPad market and the mobile advertising business.

The iAd application is one of more than 100 new user features integrated into Apple's OS 4, its latest operating system for both the iPhone and iPad. Marketed as a "new media outlet that offers consumers highly targeted information," the iAd allows application developers to generate advertisements and pocket 60 percent of the revenue. At the Apple OS 4 unveiling event, Steve Jobs highlighted the differences between this new generation of advertising, which features rich media ads that combine the "emotion" of television with the interactivity of the Web, according to Engadget.

More importantly, the iAd application represents a shift away from the Google model of search-based information gathering commonly used on laptops and desktops, towards content-based applications more in line with mobile devices. Polls have shown a drop in time spent on newspaper-owned sites but other studies indicate that a large number of iPad buyers are planning to read books and newspapers with their new gadgets.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-12 23:18

The iPad was in U.S. stores on Saturday, and many top news outlets in the country were ready to meet consumers on their newest prized possessions.

USA Today touted its app for the iPad outside the SoHo Apple store in New York Saturday, and the Wall Street Journal is featured prominently on the iPad Apps page, complete with a video inviting users to "See The Wall Street Journal in action." Other news apps available on the iPad seem to be predominantly large national or international news outlets that are not charging for the apps, such as BBC News, NPR, AP News, Reuters News Pro and NYT Editors' Choice.

Photo: Thanks to zokuga for permission to use this photo, via his flickr photostream.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-06 00:19

A select group of U.S. reviewers were given an Apple iPad a week ago, and yesterday the Wall Street Journal's Walter Mossberg wrote that he believes the device is "pretty close" to being a "laptop killer."

If people view the iPad as just another device they have to carry around, they likely won't be interested in large numbers. However, if they think they can replace their heavier laptops most of the time, for tasks like using e-mail, viewing photos and videos, playing games and surfing the Internet, "it could be a game changer the way Apple's iPhone has been," Mossberg wrote in a column for All Things Digital.

"My verdict is that, while it has compromises and drawbacks, the iPad can indeed replace a laptop for most data communication, content consumption and even limited content creation, a lot of the time. But it all depends on how you use your computer," he stated, but noted that for bigger tasks, like editing large spreadsheets or documents, you'll still need your laptop.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-02 00:10

The New York Times is still planning to launch its metered paywall early next year, because that model is right for now; but in the future, it may not be, Times Co. Chairman and Publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. said at Bloomberg BusinessWeek's Media Summit 2010, paidContent reported today.

"We believe going to a metered model now is the right thing. But 10 years from now? Who knows?" he said.

Sulzberger also discussed the issue of being in control of subscriber lists when it's time for The Times' digital version to appear on the iPad, Crains New York Business reported. And if Apple CEO Steve Jobs wants control, he's in for a fight.

"Having that direct relationship with our customer is critical," Sulzberger said during a Q&A session at the conference. "We are going to continue to have that, because it's critical to our business success."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-12 00:09

Newspaper and magazine publishers may be reluctant to jump on the iPad bandwagon, suggests ArsTechnica. Possible reasons include the 30 percent commission that Apple takes as well as the firm's policy of not sharing customer data.

Publishers view information about their subscribers as valuable since it may affect marketing plans and an outlet's content, the Financial Times (FT) reported.

We must keep the relationship with our readers," said Sara Öhrvall, senior vice-president of research at Swedish publishing group Bonnier. "That's the only way to make a good magazine."

Publishers may not agree with Apple handing out nearly a third of subscription sales over an undefined time frame. An anonymous media execute told the FT that 30 percent forever may change the economics.

A New York Times source said print circulation would determine the iPad edition, because it is viewed as "another way to distribute the paper," according to Gawker. This implies between US$20 to $30 per month, a price that may prevent readers from cancelling their print paper subscriptions. Meanwhile, those in charge of digital operations are prepared to charge around $10 per month for the iPad version.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-18 15:15

The arrival of the iPad has generated much optimism in media circles that hope it will revitalize a struggling industry, but so far, there has been much talk over what the device could do, but little evidence that shows newspapers will actually benefit from the device.

In fact, newspaper and magazine publishers have not yet agreed upon the key issue of sharing subscription revenue, as they consider deals to offer digital versions of their publications on Apple's newly released tablet, the Financial Times reports. This vital piece of the puzzle will decide whether publishers will succeed in cashing in on the iPad.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-16 21:10

InformationWeek divulged Thursday that Amazon may have acquired Touchco, a touchscreen technology manufacturer. According to a New York Times (NYT) article from Wednesday "a person briefed on the deal" revealed that Amazon would be combining the manufacturer's technology and staff members into its California-based hardware division Lab126.

The acquisition was reportedly a step to boost Kindle's touch screen mechanism in light of the launch of Apple's new device iPad, said the Wall Street Journal. The iPad is thought to be better than Kindle because it has a more colourful screen and is easier to navigate.

Touchco uses "interpolating force-sensitive resistance" technology that is placed into display screens, pointed out NYT. The technology could be entirely transparent and could cost as little as US$10 per square foot. Capacitive touchscreens used in the iPad and iPhone are relatively more pricey and cannot detect a limitless amount of simultaneous touch points.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-04 15:31

The launch of the iPad yesterday is the next step in the "device-based walled gardens," Randall Rothenberg, of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, wrote. Amazon's Kindle has built a higher wall, as anything capable of surfing the Web "still hints at the larger world." Other gated communities include the Sony Playstation, Microsoft's xBox, Netflix Streaming and more, he stated in his iab column/blog (which he has dubbed a "clog").

As walled gardens and gated communities are created, the big question that arises for content creators is: "How fragmented will the advertising supply chain become?"

Web-based marketing has grown thus far because everything is connected and the Web is standardized. When a company can't sell advertising across multiple devices, the advertising economy can become very splintered, Rothenberg stated.

Yet, others believe the launch of devices like the iPad only increase potential for marketers, Mobile Marketing Watch reported today: "The iPhone opened new possibilities in the areas of mobile advertising, branded mobile apps, in-app advertising and content distribution in general. Adding iTunes-based payments to the mix created the vibrant ecosystem we see today, and that success will parlay into the iPad as well- with a larger screen to engage users further."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-29 00:23

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