Date

Wed - 29.03.2017


app

Lekiosk, a French iOS app that offers bundle deals on magazine subscriptions, makes its UK début today.

Michael Philippe, 25, one of the start-up’s quartet of young founders (the company's CEO, Ari Assuied, is the eldest at 33), said in an interview with WAN-IFRA this afternoon that publishers including the BBC, Condé Nast, IPC Media and Dennis had already signed on, giving British consumers an initial 100 titles to choose from, such as Vogue, Wired UK, and Marie Claire. “We’re fairly confident that by the end of the year we’ll have close to 200 titles on the platform,” he said, calling it “a very good start.”

The French app, originally called Lekiosque, has been downloaded half a million times since its launch in January 2011. The idea was born in 2007, while Philippe was still in university. Frustrated by his inability to get his hands on a copy of French magazine Le Point while doing an internship in New York, he called his brother and best friend in Paris, and they came up with the idea of reproducing a French newsstand anywhere in the world.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-11 17:48

After launching less than a year and a half ago, paid digital content service Ongo is shutting down. The company, which aggregates news from around 40 publishers, presents it in a user-friendly, add-free format, and charges readers a subscription for it, will shut shop by the end of this month, reported Nieman Lab yesterday.

Ongo’s closure represents a bad bet made by some of the traditional news industry’s biggest players: The New York Times, Gannett and The Washington Post each contributed $4m to the company when it was launched.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-09 14:11

Bye bye long-text articles and hello multimedia? The popular article-saving app Read In Later, which had been equated a few years ago with Longform.org or @longreads as a saviour of long-form journalism, has been rebranded and relaunched as "Pocket," focusing on video and image content as well as text.

As TechCrunch explains, Pocket allows users to save content from the web and has a mission “similar to Dropbox’s,” enabling you to save content on any of your devices, then access it on all of them. It also allows you to read articles offline, a function that its founder, Nate Weiner, previously suggested could be useful for allowing readers to save magazine-length articles during a busy day, and come back and read them later.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-17 18:08

By using a combination of breathtaking images, specially curated content and social networking tools, the tablet app for National Geographic magazine does something that not many publications are willing to do, according to minonline: the NG app offers users an experience that is totally different from print magazine-reading.

Unlike many magazines, whose tablet apps consist of digital replicas of their print format, the NG app has a compelling splash page which offers readers just enough content—from stories to videos to photos—without being visually overwhelming, the article said.

“The art of this app is that it doesn’t overwhelm you like the site with a torrent of content. It is highly curated each day to give the user a taste,” the article said. “And this seems to us a novel and thoughtful way to come at the tablet.”

App users also have access to the full NG catalog, searchable by videos, articles, galleries, or featured photos, the article said. 

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-13 16:12

The Boston Globe announced yesterday that it was following in the footsteps of other newspapers and launching an ePaper edition for online and print subscribers, according to boston.com. The ePaper version, which mirrors the format of the print paper, can be read on a laptop or downloaded as an app for smartphones and tablets, the article said.

The “replica edition” contains additional digital features such as page-turning, navigation scrolling and bookmarking, the article said. The new version also features a “text-to-speech” option, which can read selected articles or the entire newspaper aloud.

According to the description from the iTunes app store, users can choose a setting in which Apple Newsstand automatically downloads the paper daily, just like a print version would be delivered each day. The description also states that users can click on articles to access embedded links or share those articles on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

Subscribers can obtain the ePaper from bostonglobe.com or download the app from the iTunes store, while non-subscribers can purchase single issues for $0.99 or in-app subscriptions for $14.99 per month, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 13:49

As print sales across Europe decline, what's a paper to do? As we reported earlier this week, taking advantage of different types of media is one option.

Swiss national daily Tages-Anzeiger has taken a step in this direction with the launch of a TV streaming app for iPad called TV Sélection. The paper is offering its users a choice of TV programs, feature movies and documentaries from over 100 channels hosted through TV streaming service Zattoo.

Why would users go to the app, rather than straight to Zattoo itself? This is where the editorial experience of the Tages-Anzeiger kicks in. Journalists from the paper's culture section will curate and select the best programs to create what Computer World calls "a more personal experience" that eliminates "aimless channel-flicking".

Programs are stored on part of the app called 'Total Recall' and can be viewed for a limited period after they are first made available.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-18 18:21

The holiday's over. After being available for free for the past 3 months thanks to a sponsorship deal from Channel 4, The Guardian is set to start charging for its iPad app.

Starting this Friday, current users will be asked to pay £9.99 a month for the app. Not everyone will have to pay right away: new users will be given a seven day trial period before they face any fees, and print subscribers will get the app at no extra cost. But even with these offers, the charge is The Guardian's highest fee for any digital product. The paper's mobile app, by comparison, costs £2.99 for six months, £4.99 for a year and is free in the US.

In an article for Paid Content, Robert Andrews speculates that The Guardian could generate significant revenue if it manages to convert the same proportion of free users into paying subscribers on the iPad and it has done on the iPhone. Andrews writes that The Guardian may be able to convert 47,600 of its current 280,000 active monthly users into paying customers, which would produce £475,000 per month, before Apple takes its 30% cut.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 18:23

Cash registers should be whirring happily this holiday season with sales of Apple's iPad, Amazon's Kindle Fire and other computer tablets. If the wave of buyers behave anything like those who went before, they'll be spending a lot of time on their new gadgets following the news.

But how best to capture, and profit from, the latest digital phenomenon? Most news companies have placed their bets on building customized tablet applications.

Continue reading in the Los Angeles Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-02 09:10

by Frédéric Filloux

Do encapsulated digital editions make sense? Is the notion of having a "news container", similar to a newspaper or magazine, a relic of the past or is it still associated with quality journalism? In an era of instant information, is it worth proposing a self-contained, stop-motion shot of the news cycle?

For some, the reflexive answer involves market research, readers samplings and the like. I don't think so. I'd rather abide by one of Steve Jobs' sayings:

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-26 09:50

Let's face some facts: Media companies aren't entirely sure what to do with the new crop of news reading apps that are springing up at the moment. Technology like Flipboard, Zite, or Pulse could either be a thief, a new revenue stream, or an inexpensive test bed for finding new ways to get your content in front of people. For the moment, these deals, if they are drawn up between a publisher and an app maker, typically get thrown into the category of "partnerships," like the kind of reading app Pulse has been brokering with media companies like CNN, the Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair, Time, and MSNBC.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-08-01 09:47

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation