Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


aggregator

Bye bye long-text articles and hello multimedia? The popular article-saving app Read In Later, which had been equated a few years ago with Longform.org or @longreads as a saviour of long-form journalism, has been rebranded and relaunched as "Pocket," focusing on video and image content as well as text.

As TechCrunch explains, Pocket allows users to save content from the web and has a mission “similar to Dropbox’s,” enabling you to save content on any of your devices, then access it on all of them. It also allows you to read articles offline, a function that its founder, Nate Weiner, previously suggested could be useful for allowing readers to save magazine-length articles during a busy day, and come back and read them later.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-17 18:08

Yesterday the Associated Press filed a lawsuit in the Southern district of New York against Oslo-based Meltwater News for copyright infringement. The AP complains that the Norwegian company sells articles, which are produced and owned by the AP, to paying customers without a license. The news wire wants an injunction against Meltwater as well as financial compensation.

Laura Malone, AP acting general council, is quoted in the AP's press release about the suit: "Meltwater earns substantial fees for redistributing premium news content, while bearing none of the costs associated with creating that content."

The AP also complains that, because Meltwater only pays to distribute, but not to create journalism, it can afford to undercut the AP's rates. The news agency has already lost clients to Meltwater including the US department of Homeland Security and fees from Lexis Nexis and Factiva.

What's more, the AP complains that Meltwater shares "lengthier" and "more systematic" extracts from AP news articles than other aggregators, without adding its own editorial commentary. The AP accuses Meltwater of holding onto a "vast archive of AP articles", a high proportion of which are no longer publically available on the internet.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-15 15:02

As tablets become more of a increasingly popular household fixture, the companies that package content for the devices continue make their own upgrades. Flipboard, often seen as the top dog among news aggregation apps, recently added an iPhone app, multiple accounts and larger social media footprint. Meantime, some new apps have rolled out or gained momentum, including Yahoo (NSDQ: YHOO) Livestand, News Republic, NewsMix and News360.

Continue reading on contentSutra

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-05 11:09

Today, the rise of tablets and apps is changing how we gather and consume content. A couple of apps have grabbed the headlines in recent months. Flipboard has closed over $60 million in funding and has a $200 million valuation. More recently, Zite was snapped up by CNN. Even Google (NSDQ: GOOG) is jumping on this bandwagon, based on reports of Google Propeller designed so Android and iOS users can curate content.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-23 10:58

Flipboard, a startup that has created a way to optimize online content for the iPad, has gotten a lot of attention since its debut last year. That's thanks to its promise to media companies of a potential way to create apps and new ways to display content online that are much more like magazines-and, not least, a way to do brand advertising in a better way than today's display ads on the Web. It has also been controversial, since in many cases, it's reformatting content and often stripping out ads in the process.

Continue reading on Forbes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-19 10:50

Some early observers of Ongo.com may be missing the point.

The subscription site, which launched Jan. 25, is intent on being a great "personal news experience." While there are questions about readers' willingness to pay for their news, especially when it is free elsewhere, Ongo is not trying to sell content.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-03 17:57

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation shelved this week its ambitious Alesia Project, a paid-for news content aggregation platform that promised publishers to generate new digital revenue streams, Poynter.org informed today.

"It is believed that News Corp's decision not to take the product to market is related to concerns over running costs," explained Campaign magazine, which estimated in £20 million ($31.5 million) the investment made in this venture. The digital newsstand was going to be launch in the next few weeks and at least £1 million had been already allocated to advertise it.

Although no official explanation has been provided, a source said to Reuters that the company "was unable to reach a 'critical mass' of publishers to support the plan."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-22 22:36

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation plans to launch a content-led, paid-for news content aggregation platform that promises to create new digital revenue streams for its core print titles and third-party publishers as well, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. The news aggregation platform plans to launch before the end of 2010.

While the project, under development for a year, is not being named yet, its involves content aggregation from News International's core print titles: The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World, along with content from third party publishers.

Image: Aftercollege.com

Initially planned to be launched in November, the platform's release has been delayed, as deals with publishers and blue-chip advertisers are not yet finalised, according to Media Week. The service will harness all digital applications including the iPhone and iPad, and will also carry advertising and sponsorship opportunities.

Company executives have been in talks with many U.S. and UK publishers about a news consortium believed to be associated with this launch, according to Media Week.

The news content aggregation project is led by former managing director of thelondonpaper, Ian Clark along with the corporation's digital tech specialist, Johnny Kaldor.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-06 16:06

U.S. News Media Group, which publishes the monthly U.S. News and World Report, is launching a series of real-time news feeds in collaboration with content aggregator Loud3r, paidContent.org reported today.

Using Loud3r's online search technology, the news group aims to complement its original reporting with relevant content on a myriad issues from around the Web for its readers, according to the press release published on ITNewsOnline.com. This new content channel will give editors the tools to discover and curate fresh, relevant content

"Users' expectation in the Internet age is for breadth and depth, and the traditional news organ needs to apply technology to get there because there are some tasks that are impossible for a human staff to cover," Lowell Goss, CEO at Loud3r, told paidContent. "The world expects every possible article that there might be on a particular news item."

For example, using Congress Tracker, its first real time news feed on top political issues, featuring updated profiles of all 435 members of Congress, the channel will serve as a template for all future content channels of the group, according to paidContent. Goss further added: "Aggregation doesn't only free up the newsroom, it can serve as inspiration for reporters and editors."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-10 22:11

News aggregation has been around about as long as the Internet itself, but the problem of what is legal and what is not legal is still being hotly debated and litigated in the courts. Still, the notion that aggregators are hurting the news publishing industry is supported by many, such as News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch and Associated Press Dean Singleton, a white paper, by Kimberley Isbell, of the Citizen Media Law Project, explains. And the argument isn't likely to be solved soon.

The Nieman Journalism Lab has reproduced the report, which explains the legality of various types of news aggregation. Although the paper is based on copyright laws in the United States, it is "likely to be a useful point of reference for anyone dealing in online content," Journalism.co.uk noted.

Image via NYC Comets' Flickr photostream
Isbell, explains:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-10 20:51

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