Date

Thu - 22.06.2017


advertising

Newspaper and magazine advertising group Mediabids.com, has launched a new auction product that allows advertisers to efficiently group and compare the cost of advertising across numerous titles, the group announced in a press release Monday.

"Auction by Size" invites print publications to tender prices for placing advertisements based on the requirements of the advertisers campaign. The publications may then "bid" on the pricing offer that suits their advertising needs. The advertiser is free to purchase as many of the bids, or place as many ads, as required.

"If you've ever planned a large-scale print campaign (or even gathered rates from a few publications), you know that it can be time consuming. Putting together circulation information, run dates, ad specifications and negotiating the final ad rates can take weeks if not months. That's why we created this new type of auction. Newspaper and magazine advertising is talked about as being outdated, but the way advertisers purchase it doesn't have to be," Jedd Gould, president of Mediabids.com said in the press release, posted by Ajax World Magazine.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-08 19:23

MediaNews Group plans to offer personalised newsletters to be printed in the homes of Denver readers this week Poynter Online reported. The company, which has rather secretly been developing its Individuated News project, intends for the print-at-home experiment to extend to include 25 homes, followed by 60 visitors residing at the Marriott Hotel sometime next month.

The new print-at-home technology will be installed in 300 readers' homes in Los Angeles in late summer, where MediaNews Group publishes the Los Angeles Daily News.

MediaNews Vice President Peter Vandevanter explained the details of the project, saying readers will buy the customised printer as well as pay for a subscription to the paper, which will reimburse the costs of printing. Revenue is expected to be generated by advertisers eager to reach the local consumer base.

Vandevanter said advertisers would jump at the opportunity to have ads be put "in the hands of customers who live within three miles of them."

Advertisers will be charged 5 cents per ad, per subscriber, which Vendevanter points out is a much higher rate than online newspapers are able to charge.

The newsletters that are printed in readers' homes will consist of 12 pages of news, followed by two pages of coupons. Readers can customise the news they receive by the choices they make when registering, which include preferences of news categories, cities and celebrity personalities.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-02 11:35

The Newspaper Association of America has data showing a 30 percent drop in ad revenue for U.S. newspapers in the first quarter of the year, the largest decrease seen in the past 38 years, The Detroit News reported today.

The NAA reported a drop in revenue from $2.5 billion to $5.92 billion in the course of one year amongst newspapers, while online ad revenue saw a slight decrease of 13 percent, claiming $696.3 million in first quarter revenue this year.

Drops in ad generated revenue are widely affecting the newspaper industry, with The New York Times Co. serving as an example of a company declaring a large drop (27 percent) in revenue for its first quarter.

Not since 1971, when quarterly data first became availible, has the industry seen revenue plummet so drastically.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-02 11:13

CircLabs, a venture between the Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute and several media entrepreneurs,is planning to propose new technology that claims to help news organizations in both obtaining loyal readers and introducing tiered payments, Paid Content reported.

A mixture of online content and social media, the technology will offer targeted advertising and news, all the while respecting user privacy with what CircLabs co-founder and principal Bill Densmore called "stringent protections".

The project, called "Circulate" is set to be launched next year. CircLabs says it is in talks with potentail partners, including the AP, but no official deals with news organizations have been announced as of yet.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 09:29

The Pantagraph newspaper, which is owned by Lee Enterprise, has introduced social media options to its online content, a press release for the company reported.

MyPantagraph.com, which serves central Illinois, will allow visiters to "develop their own unique profile pages, 'friend' users with like interests, upload photos, publish their own blogs and comment on blogs posted by others" according to the press release.

Another area which will see increased interactive options is the Bridal Section, where advertisers and wedding planners can interface with marrying couples.

Jeff Herr, directo of interactive media for Lee Enterprise, said that the company has been researching social media platforms fro the last two years and added "along the way, we've discovered the secret path to radically increasing engagement with our local audiences and attracting an entirely new category of advertisers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-25 09:56

A study conducted by the Pew Research Center found that increased use of online classified sites, including Craigslist, has lead to drops in classified ad revenue for newspapers, Cnet News reported.

The Pew Center reported that 49 percent of internet users claimed to use online classified sites, a 27 percent increase from 2005.

Growth in online classified sites corresponds with drops in newspaper's classified ad revenue, down from $19.6 billion in 2000 to $9.9 billion last year.

The Pew study addressed the role Craigslist, a giant among classified sites, played in the drop in revenue for newsspapers stating, "In March 2009, classified sites averaged 53.8 million unique visitors, up 7 percent from February. Craigslist had 42.2 million unique visitors in the month of March."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-25 09:15

The Onion, the beloved purveyor of fake news, will cease its weekly print circulation in San Francisco and Los Angeles, despite a recent increase in readership, the San Jose Mercury News reported.

Chief Executive Officer Steve Hannah sent a memo to the two offices by last week, in which he described advertising revenue in both cities "abysmal." The Bay Area edition, which counts 60,000 copies distributed in 1,300 locations in San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley, will print its last edition this week.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-08 10:48

MTV plans to share ad revenue with social networking sites Facebook and Twitter when it integrates content from the sites into its new show, "What You're Watching With Alexa Chung," paidContent reported.

The revenue split marks a first for both social media networks, whose platforms are often used in marketing schemes, but until now, have not received compensation for the services, and extensive market, they provide.

MTV, whose audience consists mostly of 12-to 24-year-olds, plans on airing live Facebook updates and Tweets throughout the show. If the marketing plan proves a success, it could signal a new revenue-generating model for the sites, which have yet to find a functional way to make a profit off of their content, according to paidContent.

Sean Moran, head of ad sales at MTV, said the new show is a "joint venture" with Facebook and Twitter, AdAge reported. Ad sales deals are being negotiated, and are expected to lead to revenue sharing between MTV and the social networking sites, he said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-06 13:00

After implementing an experimental mixture of online and print formats, accompanied by a limited delivery schedule, the Detroit Free Press and Detroit News have seen a rise in readership of their e-edition, as well as less subscription cancellations than expected, Poynter Online reported.

An assessment of the Detroit papers' experiment reveals some heartening results, including an approximate 6,300 readers who choose to pay more to have the paper mailed to their homes on days that have been cut from the delivery schedule, about 30,000 visits per day to the papers' e-editions and a mere 50 percent of the projected subscription losses that actually took place - with new subscriptions being filled at impressive rates.

These optimistic findings could prove valuable as newspapers struggle to decide how to maintain profitability while providing both print and online news sources. In an interview with Poynter's Bill Mitchell, the Detroit Media Partnership's Janet Hasson pointed out that attention to advertisers was crucial to the success of the transition from print to online content, saying the Detroit papers "will achieve the savings we projected (from reduced newsprint and delivery costs) and we will achieve the circulation that we're committed to...but advertising is the wild card."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-04 15:48

A study done by USC's Annenberg School for Communications shows that readers of online newspapers spend an average of 53 minutes at a site, a record level among the centre's previous studies Chief Marketer reported. The findings of the Center for the Digital Future's study also mark an increase of 12 minutes from a similar survey done last year.

The researchers also found that 22 percent of online readers reported cancelling subscriptions to newspapers due to easily accessed online content.

Director for the center Jeffrey Cole said the findings show that "the decline of newspapers is happening at a pace they never could have anticipated" and added, "only those papers that can move decisively to the Web will survive."

Cole noted in a statement that the most "significant trend about how Americans are changing their news reading habits may be found in comparing the use of online media by light users versus heavy users," Editor & Publisher reported. "Heavy Internet users spent 65 more minutes per week reading online newspapers than do light readers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-30 13:28

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