Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


advertising revenue

A bill supported by the City Clerks Assosciation of California, has been rejected by the state Senate Committee, who claimed they "weren't prepared to abandon print publishing," Lake County News reported.

The Committee expressed unwillingness to support the bill, entitled AB 715, which would no longer require cities to publish ordinances in local papers, allowing them to post such announcements on their Web sites instead.

While the bill passed unanimously in the Assembly when it was presented in May, the Senate Committee members were clearly against the new measure. San Diego Senator Christine Kehoe, said she wouldn't support the bill because it could threaten community newspapers which she said provide an important service to their readers.

Anna Caballero, who wrote the bill and presented it to the Senate Committee, said that she will continue to work on the bill and seek amendments, while the California Newspaper Publishers Association has said they are "gearing up" to fight against AB 715.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-18 12:16

An analyst has brought the imminent closure of local and regional papers in the UK to the attention of MPs, saying that half of the titles could shut by 2014 if revenue continues to decrease at the same pace, the Guardian reported.

The projection offered by Claire Enders, of Enders Analysis, predicted that newspaper revenues would plummet by 52 percent in the course of a 2007 to 2013 time span. At a hearing addressing the future of regional and local media, Enders told MPs that she expected that "half of all the 1,300 titles will close in the next five years."

As is often the case, declining advertising revenue was heavily blamed for the pending extinction of local newspapers. Committee members present at the hearing were told that online search advertising and the government's 2004 decision to pull their recruitment advertising from papers were amongst the reasons for drops in ad-related revenue.

Possibly inspired by Enders' findings, executives from the Guardian Media Group, Trinity Mirror, and Johnston Press have appealed to the Office of Fair Trading to include news aggregators like Google in their definition of the market. The dominant opinion in the industry is that such aggregators generate profits by taking content, and traffic, from online news sites and selling advertising space.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-18 10:55

A study conducted by PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PWC) predicts losses of up to $13 billion in revenue by 2013 for the North American newspaper industry Editor & Publisher reported.

Declines in advertising revenue are seen as the main source of losses in the print news business, which the study estimates will drop by 32.7 percent over the next three years.

PWC's Global Entertainment and Media Outlook report found that the American newspaper industry is suffering more than its neighbor to the North, where slower decreases in circulation and increased readership of free dailies has helped the Canadian industry.

Classified ad sales are expected to be a major source of losses for newspapers in the coming years, with want ads projected to drop 50 percent in 2009. Real estate, retail, and automotive ads will also experience declines according to the study.

The study predicts that online advertising will eventually be profitable, but not in the immediate future, claiming, "an expanding economy will translate into growing online spending and project a return to double-digit growth in 2013."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-17 10:44

Online classified ad site Craigslist is forecast to earn more than US$100 million in revenue for 2009, according to a new Classified Intelligence report, published by AIM Group, a media and Web consultant firm in Orlando, Fla, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

This revenue estimate is a 23 percent increase from 2008 and giant jump from 2004 when the site earned about $9 million.

"This is a down-market for just about everyone else but Craigslist," said Jim Townsend, editorial director of AIM Group, according to The Times.

The survey predicts annual earning by counting the number of paid ads on the site for a month and extrapolating a 12-month figure. The firm said its projections were conservative. Conversely, newspaper classified advertising in the U.S. dropped by 29 percent, the largest decline in history, according to the Newspaper Association of America.

The San Francisco based company, which promotes its "relatively noncommercial nature" and "service mission," refused comment on the study. "We are a privately held company and never comment on guesses of our revenue. Nor have we ever commented on any number bandied around in the past," said Susan MacTavish Best, a Craigslist spokeswoman, according to the Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-10 16:59

In an interview with Fox News' Liz Clayman, Digg's CEO Jay Adelson said the company is counting 1.5 billion hits of its Digg buttons on a wide variety of Web sites every month, and those figures are growing by 100 to 200 million per month, paidContent reported.

The company also hopes to be "targeting profitability this year" and projects profits once it starts generating ad revenue. "Media buyers like our space" Adelson said in the interview, adding that Digg's ads sell for as much as 10 to 20 percent more than they would in the domain of social media.

Adelson also described his companies role in helping struggling newspapers attract visitors to their sites, which in part takes the form of "helping them to understand how to leverage all these social technologies to better monetize these users," paidContent reported in an article posted by Reuters.

Along with projected profits to come from ad sales the company has been "fully funded and profitable even before we raised the 28 million" in September of last year, Adelson said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-10 14:43

Ariana Huffington told journalists in New York that she "shouldn't be blamed for killing newspapers," the San Jose Mercury News reported.

Huffington cited factors such as the economic downturn and the success of the classified ads site Craigslist as elements that have led to the financial crisis facing newspapers, especially in the United States, today. She continued to defend her site, which aggregates news without paying for it, and stressed the importance of focusing less on saving newspapers and more on saving journalism.

Recently, Syracuse University school of journalism awarded Huffington a lifetime achievement award for her site, the Huffington Post, which has been operational since 2005.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-10 08:33

Free newspapers are not weathering the economic crisis any better than their paid-for counterparts. Last year, global circulation was at 40 million, and in Europe alone circulation has fallen more than 10 percent this year, The New York Times reported.

Several dailies have also recently stopped publishing, including Spain's oldest free daily Mini Diario. The problems facing free dailies are the same that threaten paid newspapers; however, the economic downturn, which has led to advertising losses, is affecting free papers to a greater extent, as advertising is their sole source of revenue.

In light of decreasing ad revenue, many publishers of free papers are restructuring their businesses. Metro International has plans to sell some of its U.S. titles along with its editions in Italy and Portugal.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-09 11:32

A Nielsen study shows first quarter ad spending in the United States has dropped by 12 percent from last year, Media Post reported. The approximate total drop adds up to a difference of $3.8 billion.

Of the media studied, Spanish and English-language cabel television was the least affected by the decline in advertiser spending, while Sunday editions of newspapers saw a staggering 37.7 percent drop in ad revenue, with national newspapers suffering a 27.7 percent decline.

Annie Touliatos, vice president of sales development for the Monitor-Plus department at Nielsen said the results "will hardly come as a surprise to an advertising industry that's struggling just like many other areas of the American economy."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-09 11:24

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