Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


advertising revenue

Advertising expenditure in Central and Eastern Europe is growing, from US$7 billion in 1997 to a projected $45 billion in 2011, according to ZenithOptimedia.

In 1997, TV was the medium with the biggest share, 48 percent, at $3.4 billion. It continues to grow and own a majority, expected to reach 56 percent, or $25.3 billion, in 2011, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Print media, such as newspapers and magazines, owned 21.9 percent and 16.8 percent share in 1997, respectively. Both are expected to drop to 13.8 percent and 8.6 percent in 2011, respectively, according to ZenithOptimedia.

Radio and cinema are also in a decline, while outdoor and the Internet are on the rise.

Outdoor is on the upswing, from 6.2 percent, or $433 million in 1997, to a projected 10.6 percent, or $4.8 billion in 2011, while the Internet is growing from nothing to 6.2 percent, or $2.8 billion in 2011, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-21 18:54

Advertising expenditure in Western Europe, at $81.9 billion in 1997, is projected to reach $127.1 billion in 2011, according to ZenithOptimedia.

In 1997, newspapers had the biggest share, at 37.6 percent. However, newspapers' claim on the ad expenditure pie is shrinking, expected to continue to decrease to 27.1 percent in 2011, leaving the first spot to TV that year. Its actual expenditure is up a little from $30.8 billion to $34.4 billion, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

TV, which owned 29.8 percent, or $24.4 billion, of the overall ad expenditure in the region in 1997, is expected to become the medium with the largest share in 2011, at $37.5 billion, due to newspaper sectors' decline.

Magazines owned 21 percent of the overall ad spend in 1997, but is projected to recess to 13 percent in 2011. Its actual expenditure is almost flat, from $17.4 billion to $17 billion, according to ZenithOptimedia.

Radio and cinema have both seen flat growth of their shares from 1997 to 2011, while outdoor gained from 5.6 percent to 6 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-16 23:26

The Washington Post on Wednesday ended a 47-year-old relationship with the Los Angeles Times in favour of an alliance with Bloomberg News to supply content for a joint wire service, the newspaper announced Thursday.

The move follows a range of changes at The Post, including absorption of its business coverage into the main section of the newsroom.

"For us, it's 300,000 readers, many of whom we didn't have before," said Marcus Brauchli, The Post's executive editor, of the alliance with New York-based Bloomberg, founded by New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. Brauchli noted that a key advantage of the partnership is access to the high-income corporate executives and market traders who rely on Bloomberg terminals for real-time financial data.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-02 14:40

UK publisher Daily Mail and General Trust announced Tuesday it has cut the rate of decline in ad revenue in half at its flagship daily, the Daily Mail, the Times Online reported yesterday.

Advertising at the title in September was down 10 to 12 percent, versus a 21 percent decline in July and August. However, the DMGT's finance director said he "refused to call the bottom, in case it turns out we are on a ledge," according to the Times article.

Overall, advertising at Northcliffe Media, which publishes DMGT's regional papers, was down 31 percent for the 11 months ending Aug. 31, according to the BBC. Meanwhile, at Associated Newspapers, which publishes the Daily Mail and Metro, saw ad revenues slide 16 percent in the same period.

DMGT management has said it will "at least" meet market expectations for the year's profits.

"We are confident that we will at least meet market expectations for adjusted profits for the full year due to decisive actions taken on costs, with £150 million savings delivered," DMGT said in a statement, according to the Telegraph.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-01 22:05

The increase of Google Inc.'s advertising revenue is expected to come back toward the end of the year, according to Canaccord Adams analyst Jeff Rath Tuesday, The Associated Press reported.

"Our recent checks suggest that ad budgets are coming back, particularly in e-commerce," said Rath in a note to investors. He increased his price target for the Internet company's shares from US$480 to $560.

In the second quarter, Google's revenue growth dropped to only 3 percent, as companies pinched their marketing budgets in the recession, according to the AP article posted on Yahoo Finance.

Rath gave a "Buy" rating on Google shares, and expected the third-quarter results to reach expectations. According to a poll by Thomson Reuters, Wall Street analysts expected the company to earn $5.34 per share, with revenue of $4.2 billion.

Google will releases the third quarter earnings next month. However, ad agencies considered it "the calm before the storm," predicting a growth in ad budgets of up to 20 percent in the fourth quarter versus the previous, according to Rath. He also said more advertisers are thinking shifting money from traditional TV and radio to the Web, the AP reported.

Google shares were up to hit a new 12-month high of $501.49 earlier Tuesday.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-23 18:20

Community newspapers' advertising revenue is declining at half the rate of the national average, according to the Suburban Newspapers of America, Editor & Publisher reported Friday.

On a second quarter, year-to-year analysis, advertising revenue at community papers fell 12.4 percent, while the average drop was 29 percent, according to the Newspaper Association of America.

An article on the survey by Media Post News showed that the average revenue drop for the second quarter had shown a slight increase from 28.2 percent. The survey analyzed total advertising revenue across 32 community newspapers with a circulation total of 12.5 million.

"Once again, I think the figures make it apparent that the newspaper industry in general is taking a harder economic hit than the community newspapers," Nancy Lane, president of SNA, said in a statement.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-21 19:05

Worldwide advertising expenditure totalled US$189.6 billion in 1989, and reached $308.8 billion in 1998, according to ZenithOptimedia. That figure is expected to recess a little in 2009 to $490.5 billion, but bounce back 2010 and exceed $547 billion in 2011, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

In 1989, North America contributed over 45 percent of total advertising expenditure, while Western Europe took up 30 percent, Asia Pacific another 22 percent. Other regions, such as Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and rest of the world accounted for only less than two percent.

However, these three once small markets are going strong, and in 2011 are expected to account for 8.2 percent, 8.3 percent and 5 percent, respectively, according to ZenithOptimedia. Asia Pacific should remain flat at around 22 percent, while North America and Western Europe are both expected to lose significant share to 32.9 percent and 23.2 percent, respectively, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-11 17:07

Compared to the same period three year ago, media spending in the second quarter of 2009 dropped tremendously, according to Media Post. However, the Internet revenues, in terms of percentage, marked an even larger increase in the period.

Except for newspapers, the percentage share of most traditional media spending has almost stayed the same, according to data compiled from the Newspaper Association of America, the Television Bureau of Advertising, the Publishers Information Bureau, Radio Advertising Bureau, Outdoor Advertising Association of America, the Interactive Advertising Bureau and Nielsen.

Overall ad revenues declined from $41.5 billion in the second quarter of 2006 to $32.3 billion in the same period this year, down 22 percent.

The decline rate accelerated over time, according to Media Post. It dropped 0.3 percent from the second quarter of 2006 to $41.4 billion in that of 2007, but declined 5 percent from the same period from 2007 to 2008, to $39.4 billion, and even plunged 18 percent from 2008 to 2009, to $32.3 billion.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-08 18:45

West Australian Newspapers Holdings Ltd. reported full-year profit down 21 percent due to declining advertising revenue, Bloomberg reported Friday.

In the 12 months ending June 30, net income dropped to A$87.2 million (US$73 million), versus A$109.9 million one year ago. Revenue fell 11 percent to A$418.6 million, according to a company statement.

The company's shares slid up to 8.8 percent in Sydney Friday, according to Bloomberg.

Under billionaire Kerry Stokes, who started to control the company in December, West Australian News cut jobs to compensate the loss of advertising sales at its flagship, which had resulted in a reduction to full-year forecasts in May.

"The company has pursued a program to improve cost competitiveness, which is ongoing," according to Chris Wharton, managing director at Stokes's Seven Network Ltd. in Perth. "Although we continue to experience difficult trading conditions, we feel fortunate to be in Western Australia."

The company will pay a final dividend of 10 cents, compared to 32 cents last year, Bloomberg reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-10 18:56

The Bay State Banner, Boston's only African American-owned newspaper, will resume printing after almost a month's hiatus due to large decreases in advertising revenue, the Boston Herald reported.

Financial support for the publication has been made possible by a $200,000 loan from the city, which the Banner's publisher Mel Miller accepted from mayor Thomas M. Menino, while pledging to maintain the paper's independence despite the government's aid.
In an announcement on their Web site, the paper projected an August 6 relaunch of the title, made possible by the backing of readers and the community.

"Starting Aug. 6, readers can once again expect the same independent, informative and well-researched journalism that has characterized the Banner for 44 years," the announcement promised, adding that the return to the presses happened in "record time."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 15:18

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