Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Web 2.0

Paywall, begone—for a limited time, that is. Starting this past Monday and lasting until May 6, The Boston Globe is offering readers a free trial of all of its online content on BostonGlobe.com to show off its new elements and try to gain some new subscribers in the process, paidContent reported.

By entering their email addresses, users will have complete access to online content, including the downloadable ePaper version of The Boston Globe, the article said. The free trial, which also includes a deal in which users can subscribe online for $0.99 for the first eight weeks, is sponsored by Coldwell Banker, according to the Globe website.

Peter Doucette, Globe Executive Director of Circulation Sales and Marketing, told paidContent, “The impetus for the free trial is getting the word out on new features, including the Boston Globe ePaper.”

As we previously reported, The Boston Globe launched its ePaper version, a replica of the print edition that can be read on laptops, mobiles, and tablets, in March. The replica edition comes equipped with several new features, including a text-to-speech option with audio-recorded sections of the paper.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-25 12:26

We've put together a Storify of some of the best video clips from Digital Media Europe 2012, which took place in London from the 16th - 18th April.

Follow the link below to take a look.

[View the story "What should publishers be doing with digital?" on Storify]

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 12:20

Storify, the popular curation tool that allows users to create stories by pulling together elements from Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Instagram and other social networks, has announced that it has struck its first syndication deal, with the news app Pulse as its partner.

A selection of Storify’s feeds will now be available on the popular newsreader app, which allows users to select a number of news organisations, blogs and social networks, and see their latest content collected within a single display.  According to TechCrunch, Storify’s co-founder Burt Herman says that Pulse will start by making just nine Storify feeds available, but this number may be expanded based on the response from users.

TechCrunch quotes Herman, who clarifies that “Pulse users can follow certain select user accounts that have been doing great work with Storify, including The Washington Post, Al Jazeera and the White House.” He explains further: “We’re also offering our own Storify Featured Stories feed as a channel, where we curate the day’s best stories created across the platform – the same stories that are also featured daily on our own homepage.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 17:25

When it comes to launching tablet and mobile apps, “the experience is everything,” says Greg Taylor, UX Strategy Director for Tigerspike which developed The Telegraph in the UK’s successful mobile and tablet apps.

Taylor presented the app roadmap that the Telegraph took in developing and ultimately launching its tablet app.

That roadmap included the experience of developing the app over a number of years, launching and testing the app to gain valuable feedback to improve the product, and ultimately creating a coherent monetisation strategy.

“Getting your head around how your users will use the app and content is absolutely critical and I don’t think companies do enough of that,” he said.  “I am interested in how people feel after they put that device down. And please make everything you do on these devices as simple as possible.”

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog.

Author

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-19 10:33

As Metro International, with 17 million readers of its free daily around the world, extends its “Metro Moment” to more digital platforms, Maggie Samways makes one promise: “There will be no paywall in Metro’s future. Scout’s honour.”

Samways, Executive Vice President and Global Editor-in-Chief of Metro International in the UK, presented the company’s digital strategy which is more about “extending the Metro Moment than defending it,” she says.

That Metro Moment occurs every morning as readers commute to work between 7 and 9 a.m. For most, that has meant reading Metro’s print edition. But today that is being challenged by the onslaught of other platforms.

“The most important thing for us is to be true to our DNA and that is the Metro Moment. To continue to define what that means to us and our readers and especially what that means to them on mobile, tablets, and web.”

In essence, Samways says Metro wants to build new distribution channels, gain unique access to online audiences and thus create new Metro Moments. “We will use the print product to build awareness of our new products, continue to target people on the move and create some of those ‘lean back’ moments with Metro using verticals that are relevant to readers.”

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog.

Author

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-18 10:23

“I am bored sick of talking about paywalls,” said Tom Whitwell, editorial director of Times Digital. “Instead of debating payment models we need to learn how to build digital products that people are willing to pay for,” he continued.

The Times launched a controversial paid online strategy in summer 2010, which gives no access to non-subscribers. “Every commentator told us we were wrong,” said Whitwell, but he believes it is necessary to be “fearless,” and now the paper has 130,000 paying digital subscribers.

Readers were surveyed about how best to charge online and the biggest thing that came out of the discussions was the need for simplicity: a straightforward system where people knew what they were getting for their money.

Subscribers pay £2 a week for web access plus mobile, £4 a week for web, mobile and tablet, or £6 per week for all digital access plus a daily print edition.

This is working because of the quality of the paper’s journalism, said Whitwell. “The only way we can charge £4 a week to read our stuff is because of our journalism,” he stressed.

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-18 09:49

Just over a year after The New York Times’ digital subscription model was launched, it provides the company with “incredible” audience data, the company’s chairman and CEO Arthur Sulzberger says at WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference in London.

A total of 454,000 people have subscribed (not including print subscribers), and Sulzberger says much of the scepticism that abounded when the plan was first announced has since subsided. Given the number of media executives who have visited the paper’s offices over the last year, he expects many more payment models for digital content to be unveiled before long.

As well as the obvious financial benefit, Sulzberger noted that a key advantage of the subscription model is what it tells the paper about its audience’s reading habits.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-16 16:59

Is paid content worth more than newspapers are currently selling it for? Several US publishers who spoke at a Newspaper Association of America press conference seem to think so, Poynter reported.

Gannett President of US Publishing Bob Dickey said at the conference that he projects Gannett’s paid digital newspaper subscriptions will be worth $100 million in 2013, according to Poynter.

Gannett conducted marketing research that led the company to decide in favor of paywalls, which were implemented at 80 Gannett papers this year, the article said. According to Dickey’s description of the research finding, “Readers value our content at a higher price than they pay,” the article said.

Dickey also said that Gannett may need to enhance its digital content in order to sustain paid subscriptions, which could mean the hiring of additional "content creators," the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-10 12:45

RR Donnelley's Press+ announced today in a press release that 323 publications are now using its metered digital subscription model platform to generate online revenue, up from only 24 last year.

Press+, cofounded in 2009 by Stephen Brill and Gordon Crovitz and purchased by RR Donnelley in 2011, helps newspapers establish paid-content models by limiting the amount of free articles readers can access online from between 5-15 per month rather than using hard paywalls, according to the press release.

Numerous large US and Canadian newspaper companies, including McClatchy, Tribune Company and GateHouse Media, operate through Press+, the release stated.

Press+ said results of its metered model implementation have been generally positive, claiming advertising revenue either stayed the same or increased for most publications and that readership held steady, despite more limited access to articles.

“By asking their most engaged readers to pay for digital content, print publishers have built a high-margin, recurring revenue stream from digital subscriptions that will carry their businesses into the digital age,” the release said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-02 17:10

Social media is a powerful tool for media organisations. It can be used to gather news, connect with audiences and increase the impact of stories. But social media can bite the hand that feeds it too - it can turn into an equally powerful forum to spread mistakes and amplify negative reactions to a brand.  

How can media companies handle these kind of situations to maintain the trust of their communities, deal with negative comments and ensure that they are sharing accurate information?

A panel discussion at the Social Media World Forum in London today, featuring representatives from a variety of industries including broadcast media, the police force and social networks themselves, tried to provide some answers.

Here's what they said:

 - Be prepared in advance.

As David Bailey, neighbourhood communications manager for the Staffordshire police put it, “you can’t learn social media while the streets are burning.”

If a big, negative story is about to break, you have to already have built up a connection with the community, and know how to respond to your users comments and criticisms. Colin Smith, the UK’s director of marketing solutions for LinkedIn backed Bailey up, emphasising that “people respond well if you’ve already built up trust.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 17:56

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