Date

Thu - 23.11.2017


Printing and Production

The most famous contract in the UK logistics market has landed in the hands of a different vendor, Logistics Manager announced today. Rupert Murdoch, owner of News International, has opted for DHL instead of Ceva Logistics to deliver some 25 million newspapers to wholesalers across England and Wales.

The multimillion-pound, five-year deal entails road transport from four printing plants to 68 wholesalers throughout the region 364 days per year, according to International Freighting Weekly.

News of the deal follows an upgrade of News International's printing presses in Broxbourne, reported by Logistics Manager on October 22. Automation of the site was part of a £650 million initiative by the corporation, which produces half of its demand for The Times, News of the World, The Sunday Times, and The Sun (nicknamed the Currant bun) at this location.

The contract became famous during the 1980s when News International turned to a road courier during the Wapping newspaper strike. In doing so, the media giant unintentionally revolutionised news delivery.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-03 20:36

The Wall Street Journal has been used as an example time and again as having mastered the paid/free online transformation - a fine line many publishers continue to struggle with. In December, those attending the 62nd World Newspaper Congress can hear the chief of Dow Jones, the Journal's parent company, explain exactly how the conversion was performed.

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) announced Saturday that Les Hinton has been added to the programme of the World Newspaper Congress to be held December 1-3 in Hyderabad, India.

In addition to how to monetize Web content, Hinton is expected to discuss Professional Edition, a premium service the Journal launched on October 21.

Professional Edition delivers to mobile handsets a selection of digitised news articles which are tailored to the subscriber's industry.

Following the Congress, WAN-IFRA is offering a study tour in India from December 4 to 7 to examine outsourcing and offshoring across the value chain.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-02 16:44

In the style of some museums and restaurants, The Hannibal Courier-Post in February gave up on Mondays altogether, according to The Associated Press. Slicing the slow ad day from "Missouri's oldest daily" may have interrupted its record of continuous publication (since 1838) but, at least, it kept the newspaper as a whole in operation, according to its publisher Jack Whitaker.

The Courier-Post is not the only U.S. newspaper experimenting with changes in print delivery in search of continued viability as a going concern. Just yesterday, Superior Publishing Corp. announced it would also suspend one print day per week at its three Minnesota newspapers.

"These changes are part of overall strategy to enhance the newspapers' multi-media presence and leverage the value of the Internet while maintaining full news coverage for the community," President Charles Johnson was quoted by Business North as saying.

The suspension at Superior - effective next week - follows last month's switch to online access fees for nonsubscribers of the print edition.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

A major U.S. publisher has signed a five-year deal to update its technological infrastructure with a top name in information technology, according to PR Newswire.

The deal expands a pre-existing alliance through which Belo outsourced help desk and similar back-end functions to IBM about which Broadcast Engineering reported in 2006. Belo Corp. publishes daily print editions of The Dallas Morning News, The Providence Journal, The Press-Enterprise (Riverside, California) and the Denton Record-Chronicle (Denton, Texas).

The company also publishes specialty publications targeting young adults and the fast-growing Hispanic market, including Quick and Al Dia in Dallas/Fort Worth, and El D and La Prensa in Riverside. Belo also operates 30 websites associated with a variety of media outlets it owns.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 15:08

Time Warner Inc.'s business magazine will reduce the editions it publishes each year by more than 25 percent, Reuters India reported today. The reduction in editorial content comes as journalism advertising continues to struggle out of a yearlong slump. Yahoo! India reported today that management declined to comment on the matter, but that the company expected to cut some 600 jobs across various publications, amounting to more than six percent overall.

This is Time Inc.'s second round of layoffs in the past year, according to Bloomberg. In November 2008, the company cut as many as it expects to dismiss this year. The Wall Street Journal reported today that unidentified sources revealed that those scheduled to be laid off will be advised in the coming weeks. Part of Fortune's overhaul will also include an upgrade to the Web site, the Wall Street Journal said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-23 17:21

The Associated Press is hoping enriched metadata will stop others from scraping its scoops, an e-newspaper hosting and design service announced yesterday.

TownNews.com is a newspaper-specific Web publisher founded in Bigfork, Montana in 1989. Since then, TownNews.com's services have apparently expanded beyond initially automating news content to include optimising Internet traffic and, now, providing security to those losing profits from posting their wares on the Web. The e-publisher yesterday struck an accord with the AP to offer TownNews.com clients the option of implementing a microformat known as hNews 0.1.

hNews 0.1 was developed by the AP in partnership with a UK nonprofit, Media Standards Trust, using open source technology known as microformatting. This microformat has as its chief aim the prevention of copyright infringement. It strives to do this by embedding metadata indicating whether a given site is validly licensed to republish an article.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-22 16:59

A media critic at Washingtonian magazine yesterday panned the recent redesign of the Washington Post's print edition, likening the newspaper's makeover to a moving of deck chairs on the Titanic. Harry Jaffe was especially critical of the switch from Postroman to Scotch Roman font, a script apparently used since the 1800s.

"The new type is thinner and will allow the Post to get more words on the page," Jaffe wrote. "Being less bold, it is slightly harder to read, especially for Boomers with fading eye sight [sic], and they make up the bulk of print readers."

However, Editorial Page Editor Fred Hiatt said the new typeface takes more space - not less. Hence, an extra page is being added to Friday's opinion section, Editor & Publisher reported Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-21 17:28

Not content to leave success to chance, 13 New York Times staffers have spent almost four years analysing the myriad of ways the newspaper might better use new media to connect with existing and potential readers, Editor & Publisher reported yesterday.

The NYT's research and development team is organised into three main categories: core technology development, emerging platforms, and analytics and audience generation.

The unorthodox application of a research and development component to the world of publishing comes even as science laboratories have begun outsourcing or pooling such functions because of their perceived inefficiencies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-09 15:13

Promising to "[j]azz up your blog, at no cost, with millions of premium, relevant, fresh and legal images to choose from," PicApp today announced it has taken another step toward "solidifying its position as the ultimate source for images online," TechCrunch reported Tuesday.

The step entails a partnership with WordPress, which is apparently the online self-publishing home of choice, boasting more than 7.5 million bloggers to its credit.

While PicApp's venture with WordPress is not the first such partnership by the Israel- and San Francisco-based image broker, this project appears to be PicApp's most ambitious thus far.

Presently, PicApp claims a databank of 20 million premium images, purportedly properly licensed for legal compliance, and fully tagged for improved searchability.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-06 18:35

Throughout 2005, the year after Google went public on the NASDAQ, the company commissioned multiple research agencies to run analysis on the importance of Internet search and search advertising in purchasing decisions across a variety of verticals, TechCrunch reported Wednesday.

Part of this research eventually found its way to the Google AdWords product page, which permits newspaper publishers to gain insight into consumer behavior important to advertisers.

For the Beauty vertical, the survey yielded insightful data on which influential information sources [besides Google's search engine] respondents indicated as important to them when purchasing beauty products on the Web.

Topping the list were Print (49%) and TV (46%), closely followed by search engines searches and POS displays in stores (both 43%). Sponsored links in search results was surprisingly low in the list, with 12% of respondents saying it's an important resource for them when buying skin care products, fragrances etc. In February, Google tabled a test project through which it had published print ads for newspapers.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-30 17:29

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation