Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Printing and Production

"In an age of scrappy messages and information saturation - people want editorial criteria. We need to go from journalist to journANALYST," said Juan Senor, vice president of the International Media Consulting Group. He discussed the 2009 Global Report on Innovations in Newspapers. He then answered three main questions: What do people want from a newspaper in the 21st century, where is the money, and how do we get there?

Senor predicted that paper will always be around. Although it will never die, the business models and the content propositions have changed. "Complacency is the biggest threat to newspapers," said Senor. "What we're putting in these front pages is not relevant." Publications are repeating the same headlines on front pages and it is redundant. We need to have different ideas, he said.

In order to present these ideas, Senor has organized his thoughts into three questions in which he proceeds to offer suggestions on how to make a successful transition to the media world.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 08:53

Creating a good brand is done through leadership, Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., which publishes The Times of India told this afternoon's session of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad. Speakers discussed how their businesses make money, while remaining credible and effective and still incredibly popular - through print.

Dhariwal and his company have made The Times of India a brand rather than just a newspaper through extensive marketing and interactivity. Establishing The Times as a cheerleader for the country was a key part of this branding strategy, along with keeping it "virtually free" for everyone.

Publisher and Editor in Chief of the newly launched 'i,' a daily newspaper in Portugal, Martim Figueiredo, says the newspaper sees costs of about 8 million euro and 4.5 million euro in profits, and will lose nearly 3.5 million euros in its first year of operation. However, with the advertising and reader response so far and despite heavy challenges, he envisions a break-even in 2014. The newspaper is targeting a high class, sophisticated audience, which also appeals to advertisers.

"We are not so much worrying about our future; we'd like to think we are making our future. I couldn't find one publisher in Australia that would accept that its product is going to die." This was the message from Mark Hollands, CEO of PANPA (Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers' Association) in Australia.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 12:37

More than a dozen reports from 2008-2009 were presented and analyzed by Indian freelance journalist Sridala Swami from WAN-IFRA's Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project.

She detailed the relationship between growing technologies and monetization. Editorial content management systems can enhance quality, reduce costs, ease the use of blogging, social networking, and sharing. Newspapers by their nature already have print, and they also have access to online, so the real opportunity is to intergrate and "get a lot more bang for your buck."

François Nel, director of Journalism Leadership Programmes at the University of Central Lancashire in the United Kingdom. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

Many newspapers have been outsourcing much of their work to other countries, including their advertising, to reduce costs. For outsourcing to succeed, publishers should analyze the proccesses of each of their departments in order to to clearly identify which functions are appropriate to outsource. Newspapers that are growing are focusing on strengthening credibility and audience focus. Media audiences crave content that is tailored to them which can be discovered through reader research and by combining consumer databases.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 07:00

Poking a little fun at some late-coming high technology, The Sun newspaper today marked its 40th anniversary in continuous publication by posting several videos to its Web site highlighting the pioneering nature of its paper edition, Media Blog reported today.

One video demonstrates the high-tech nature of its pen-to-paper interface crossword puzzles, as well as its easy-to-disseminate pullout pages, a.k.a. file sharing, TechCrunch Europe today reported.

A second video seen today on The Sun's Web site launches a copy of the tabloid into outer space, "boldly going where no newspaper has gone before." A camera is attached to the tabloid which purports to show the paper flying through the cosmos. The newspaper's trajectory is then tracked through a standard GPS installed in a parked automobile near a cornfield where the newspaper ultimately makes a safe landing.

The Sun is an asset of News International, in which media mogul Rupert Murdoch owns a controlling stake.

The Apple Tablet presumes to replace all printed material via a handheld electronic publishing device. Its launch has been postponed several times and is now not expected to be released until late next year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-01 09:28

Dietmar Schantin, director at WAN-IFRA, spoke today about the integration of print and digital media. The interaction between the two is vital for future newspapers in order for them to stay successful.

All media is being used now to get the news out as quickly as possible. He explained the importance of each media and how it relates to and relies on another.

Schantin also described the four most prominent types of newsrooms by the way they are organised and prioritised. They are the Multiple Media Newsroom, the Cross Media Newsroom, the Media Integrated Newsroom and the Audience Targeted Newsroom. Each type differs mainly in the structure but all of the structures focus on the same goal, he said.

The multiple media newsroom uses separate editorial units for both the print and online news. Journalists in these newsrooms often do their own reporting and research.

The cross media newsroom relies on the concept that journalists provide content for all types of media under their channel. Each channel may have different goals and specifications but the journalist will still provide the content for all media.

The Media Integrated Newsroom integrates the complete news flow from print to digital, beginning to end. One journalist is not in charge of the news flow as in the first two newsrooms. Instead, a section head is responsible for the news gathered.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-30 14:51

Release of an electronic chalkboard from MacIntosh has been postponed so many times that PC World Thursday joined other gadget analysts in speculating that the much-anticipated product might be dead in the water. However, neither repeated design delays nor rumours that the project will ultimately be abandoned has stopped Conde Nast magazines from proceeding with development of Apple Tablet-compatible editions by pdf-maker Adobe, Mac Rumors said Saturday.

The Tablet's latest slow-up was attributed to a switch in subparts by DigiTimes on Thursday. Nevertheless, Conde Nast has prepared tablet-ready editions - for Apple, or its competitors - starting with a digital version of Wired, according to All Things Digital. To cement its commitment, Wired followed that report with a video published Saturday demonstrating the concept.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-23 15:33

Colin Lin, 50, invites fellow couturiers the world over to brainstorm new uses for old newspapers, according to The Associated Press. The Taiwan-based designer has already come up with her own strategy: attach them to strips of cotton and weave them into shoes and bags that are ecofriendly as well as profitable.

"I only contribute very little to recycling all the newspapers dumped everyday around the world," Lin was quoted in today's AP article as saying. "But other footwear and bag manufacturers may want to copy my idea and so contribute their own share to dealing with the problem."

Apparently, some already have. The full wardrobe of a fashion show at Hainan University last October featured nothing but recycled newspaper clothing, as China View then reported.

Photo: AP, via Daily Press

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 15:34

In a development lauded by the printer as a success, The Australian newspaper - published also in England to satisfy expats - has joined the digital revolution that is overtaking the rest of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. holdings in the United Kingdom. That is, The Australian will soon be printed at a Stroma plant in London recently automated to conduct the printing process digitally. As a result, Aussies abroad will receive their hardcopy newspapers as many as six hours earlier than their countrymen back home.

The Australian's transition to digital printing follows a similar switch in New York. News & Tech reported in October that The Wall Street Journal, historically printed at mammoth analog presses in South Brunswick, New Jersey, has converted two of its own presses to digital production and will outsource the rest of its newspaper demand to local printers.

Digital printing is in its infancy, except in Malta, where Miller Newsprint Ltd., has been churning out The Financial Times, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Sunday Mirror, Daily Star, Daily Express, The Daily Mirror and The Daily and Sunday Telegraph on a Kodak VL4200 for some time, News & Tech reported Thursday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-10 17:45

As of 2010, an eco-friendly exterior design firm will begin offering insulation made of recycled newspapers, a real estate Web site today announced. According to La Vie Immobiliere, Soprema of Strasbourg has opened a plant in Cestas capable of converting old newspapers into as much as 5,000 tonnes of heat-trapping wadding per year. Newspaper insulation is more energy efficient to produce than fiberglass, according to an October 13 article about the innovation in La Tribune.

It is not clear what impact the general decline in print newspapers has had on the price and availability of recycled materials of this kind.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-06 16:24

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