Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Printing and Production

The Jornal do Brasil, which in 1995 became the first Brazilian newspaper to launch an online edition, is studying whether it should stop publishing its print edition and offer only an Internet version, the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas revealed.

In a half-page ad published in its June 30 edition and under the title "Your opinion for the future," the newspaper invited readers to participate on an online survey regarding the publishing change. According to the announcement, the goal of the national daily is "to reinforce and prioritize its digital platform."

However, the newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo reported that the interruption of the circulation is an attempt to solve the daily's financial problems as its liabilities have reached the $451 million dollars mark, mostly due to labour and tax debts.

Although the results of the research will not be published until August, the columnist of the Jornal du Brasil Guilherme Barros said the change would take place. "The tendency is to become the first traditional newspaper in the country to become only electronic," Guilherme said, El Mundo quoted.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-06 19:41

As the news publishing industry continues to try and figure out a viable economic model to replace print revenues, the Journal Register Company believes the future of journalism and the print industry lies in community crowdsourcing and the usage of free publishing tools available on the Internet.

To prove it, the American media company produced on Sunday the print editions of its 18 dailies and their website content using only free web-based sofwares such as Picasa, Gimp and Scribus, Editor & Publisher reported.

Photo: John Paton

This achievement was a "declaration of independence" from proprietary publishing systems and "the old way of thinking" as journalists use social media websites to get story ideas and Google Docs and Scribus to write the news, CEO John Paton said in a press release.

The publication of the 18 dailies was the last step in the company's Ben Franklin Project, launched in April to prove that newspapers can be produced at lower costs by using free tools. The initiative also aimed to open the newspaper-making process to readers so they could be a part of the news-gathering stage.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-05 22:51

Since 2008, more than 166 newspapers in the United States have closed down or stopped publishing a print edition, according to Paper Cuts, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

More than 39 titles did so in 2008, and the number rose to 109 in 2009. So far in 2010, more than 18 papers have closed down or stopped publishing a print version.

According to Paper Cuts, there have been nearly 35,000 job losses or buyouts in the U.S. newspaper industry since March 2007. From March to December 2007, more than 2,256 newspaper jobs have been reportedly eliminated or offered buyouts.

The numbers increased to more than 15,992 in 2008 and were at more than 14,783 in 2009. As of May 2010, there have been more than 1,797 job losses or buyouts in newspaper companies in the country, according to the report, Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-05 20:25

Rue89, the French pro-am news website launched its first monthly print edition, Rue89 Le Mensuel, last week, that translates as Rue89 the monthly, Journalism.co.uk reported.

While the decision to go from online to print was an editorial and commercial one, according to founder Pierre Haski, this move aims to "replicate in print the spirit of the website: serendipity and an eclectic choice of stories written both by journalists and non-journalists, accompanied with selected comments from our web audience."

The former online-only title will now be available on print as a 100-page, micro format magazine costing €3.90 per issue and €34 for an annual subscription. The magazine will select 10 percent of its online published content that deserve another reading experience and give stories a second life, while creating a new revenue stream from sales and advertising on print.

Having launched in 2007 by a former team of Liberation journalists, this news site secured €1.1 million investment from five new investors in 2008 before closing the news operations of its sister site in Quebec. The launch of this magazine has been self-funded, according to Haski. He said, "The investment is actually quite minimal as content is produced by our team (20 full-time staff and some freelance writers). We're counting first on the website and our community to promote it. There's no massive and costly promotion campaign."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-21 22:24

Around the world, newspapers are recognizing the value and promise for the future that is created by implementing a green strategy. The move to be more environmentally friendly is happening across businesses, consumers and governments. For their part, news publishers are taking a hard look at efficiencies that can be implemented across their value chains, such as more aggressive recycling schemes, reducing carbon dioxide emissions, lowering electricity usage and better ways of handling e-waste, SFN's Going Green reported.

InfoTrends, a U.S.-based market research and strategic consulting firm for the digital imaging and document solutions industry, partnered with the North American Publishing Company in January 2008 to create a new quarterly tracking programme called "Emerging Strategies in Production Print." The project is aimed at polling print service providers on the hottest industry topics.

Among those surveyed, most agreed that their company's management is very supportive of green issues, with an average response of 3.8 for in-plant respondents and 3.7 for print-for-pay respondents, on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree), the study found.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-08 23:40

Celebrating press freedom, Zimbabwe's newly created media commission granted licenses to allow the launch of four new private dailies last week, including the Daily News, a popular newspaper banned in 2003 for taking on the government of President Robert Mugabe. The country today saw the launch of one of its first licensed independent private daily, News Day, after seven years, TimesLive.co.za reported.

The newly launched private daily is owned by Alpha Media Holdings, and headed by Trevor Ncube. The company publishes two weeklies in Zimbabwe, and the Mail and Guardian in South Africa. The launch of News Day "represents the hope of a tortured nation," Ncube told Reuters. "NewsDay will play a leading role in national healing, nation building, reconciliation and reconstruction."

He later added, "We shall endeavor to report the news for Zimbabweans whose collective voice has systematically been drowned out the din of slogans and abhorrent propaganda."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-04 22:39

Dubai-based Atlas Media Communications has entered into an agreement with Newspaper Direct to print up to twelve international newspaper titles in the UAE, The National reported last week.

The deal is part of a US$4 million (Dh14.69 million) business plan that includes the possibility of franchise agreements in other regional markets as well.

Image: The National

Previously, the newspapers had to be flown in. Each newspaper required a license from the UAE government and approval from the National Media Council, and it took two months to obtain the license, Amit Radia, chief executive of Atlas Media Communications, told The National.

"This model allows you more personalisation [of newspapers], it reduces lead times, and helps you cope with market demand, instead of being stuck with half a million copies a day," he said.

According to the license agreement, the company plans to print more European titles, newspapers from the United States, Far East, Australia and South Africa across the Gulf states and east Africa as well. However, change of any content or sale of local advertising in the newspapers the company republishes in the UAE is prohibited under the local law.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-03 22:52

The British Library announced a partnership with online publisher brightsolid to digitise up to 40 million newspaper pages from its at Colindale archives, and make them online accessible, according to Culture 24.

This will includes 52,000 local, regional, national and international titles since up to the last three centuries.

The 10-year project will cover minimum of 4 million pages over the first two years. As Over the course of ten years, as the mass digitisation process becomes more efficient and as in-copyright content is scanned following negotiations needed, it aims to finish 40 million pages.

The library will mainly focus on digitising papers which document historical events in the 19th century, including the Crimean War, the Boer War and the suffragette movement, Media Guardian reported.

"This will be the largest mass digitisation of historic newspapers the UK has ever seen," said library spokesman Ben Sanderson.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-19 20:00

Following the recent launch of a new fund management section by London free business daily, City AM, the newspaper launched a weekly vodcast on the homepage of its Web site on April 30, and will publish a one-off election special evening edition called 'City PM' tomorrow.

The launch of a weekly vodcast is the outcome of a recent deal brokered by the newspaper with Pure Media, on behalf of Forex.com. The five-minute "Market Update" weekly vodcast features Allister Heath, editor of the newspaper, discussing finances and the economy, and is sponsored for the next 12 weeks by Forex.com, an online trading service provider, MediaWeek reported. The weekly vodcast aims to provide the newspaper's audience with a chance to hear valuable opinions from the editor, while offering Forex an opportunity to engage with its target audience as well.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-06 22:13

The owner of Express Newspapers, Richard Desmond, has invested £100 million in new colour printing presses for his titles, which include Daily Express, the Sunday Express, the Daily Star and the Daily Star Sunday, Press Gazette reported yesterday.

The new presses will reportedly work three times faster, allowing for later deadlines and fuller coverage of breaking news. They will also allow full colour for editions up to 128 pages, therefore creating the opportunity for the newspapers to profit from colour advertisements.

According to the Daily Express, each press from the German company Koenig & Bauer AG will generate 90,000 copies an hour, instead of 22,000 an hour produced by existing machinery.

The new presses will be installed at Westferry Printers in London, which also prints the Financial Times in the UK and is wholly owned by Desmond after he bought out Telegraph Group last year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-06 18:58

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