Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Print Data

eMarketer is dim on the outlook for U.S. newspaper publishers. "Their business model is broken and advertisers are bailing," AdWeek reported.

Newspaper ad sales would plummet 16.4 percent to $37.9 billion in 2008, and will fall to $28.4 billion by 2012. Its revenue decline is more quickly than in any other major medium's.

Classifieds are down due to craigslist and its brethren, AdWeek reported.

eMarketer added that newspaper circulation keeps dropping as readers are migrating to the Web. The relatively high fixed costs, including paper, printing and distribution are also burdens.

"The financial pressure on newspapers is enormous," said eMarketer. "To attract both readers and advertisers, they have invested in beefing up their Web sites. But even online ad revenue -- which offered a glimmer of hope -- has begun to slow," AdWeek reported.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-16 05:10

Rival newspapers The Dallas Morning News and Fort Worth Star-Telegram will team up for some of their sports coverage to cut expenses and duplication of work, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

In autumn 2008, the two papers also signed a joint distribution agreement, and at the end of the year began sharing some photos and arts coverage.

The Morning News will cover basketball team the Dallas Mavericks and hockey team the Dallas Stars, and that coverage will be available to the Star-Telegram. Meanwhile, the Star-Telegram will cover the Texas Rangers baseball team and that coverage will be available to The Morning News. However, the teams will not share their largest beat, that of the Dallas Cowboys football team, or sports columnists or investigative stories, the AP reported in a story posted by The Morning News.

Coverage of some university teams and other sports will also be shared.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-14 02:51

Free weekly newspaper AsianWeek, based in San Francisco, published its last print edition Friday, and is now an online-only publication, the San Francisco Chronicle reported last week.

The online edition will continue to publish special reports and host events, but tough economic times led the newspaper to end the print version, said Ted Fang, editor and publisher of the newspaper, which has a target audience of Asian Americans.

"There are fewer major newspapers, fewer newspaper readers and fewer newspaper advertisers than ever before," Fang and his brother, James Fang, the president of the company, wrote in a letter to readers published in Friday's edition. "A faltering economy has accelerated the decline."

Nearly all of the newspaper's 11 employees will lose their jobs as a result of closing the print version, the Chronicle reported. The newspaper had a circulation of 58,000, 95 percent of which were picked up by readers.

Ted Fang told the Chronicle that the print edition is just one way to reach readers, and that the digital edition is increasingly growing as part of a global trend toward getting news online. Additionally, Asian Americans "have led the way in the digital revolution, migrating away from print media and into receiving their news and information electronically," he said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-09 00:17

Gannett Co., Inc. unveiled its local/national Web hybrid ContentOne Tuesday, paidContent reported. The company's Chairman, President and CEO Craig Dubow announced the creation of ContentOne, based on the Web start-up model, on December 10, 2008, at the 36th Annual Global Media and Communications Conference in New York.

ContentOne will help develop and gather information more efficiently across Gannett's properties, and will showcase content as a company-side product, as well as putting Gannett properties in a position to become content creators for their own ad partners, Dubow said at the conference.

Gannett plans a digital push for 2009. "We must execute these plans, and we'll be ready when the economy returns," Dubow told conference attendees.

ContentOne will serve as a platform for Gannett's 85 local newspaper Web sites, as well as USA Today's site, paidContent reported.

According to a Gannett memo obtained by Jim Hopkins, who writes the Gannett Blog, ContentOne's debut has two top components:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-07 00:33

India's print media firms are postponing expansion plans, cutting jobs and slashing page numbers as advertising budgets shrink amidst the economic slump, The Wall Street Journal reported at the end of 2008.

The situation may contradict previous trends in the country, as new daily titles were being launched every month of late. Plunging newsprint prices aren't enough to counterbalance dropping ad revenue, which may offer as much as 75 percent to a publication's overall revenue.

Ad revenue is predicted to increase by an average of 10 to 12 percent in 2009, compared to the 18 percent that the field saw during the last two years, according to the Journal article, posted by Media InfoCenter. India's economy is starting to slow down, after experiencing an average expansion of 8.8 percent over the last four years.

"These are very uncertain times, a very challenging environment. The cumulative effect of the (current) times is that the advertisement industry is experiencing a volume slowdown," said Rajiv Verma, HT Media Ltd. chief executive. HT publishes the English-language Hindustan Times.

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Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-01-06 04:28

Newspaper insert magazine Parade added 71 new newspaper partners this year to its national distribution, an additional circulation of 2.42 million, MediaPost reported Tuesday.

The magazine's total circulation is now at 33 million, and Conde Nast-owned Parade claims it has a readership of 73 million. It is now inserted into 470 newspapers across the United States.

Of the 71 new newspapers, including the Napa Valley Register (California), Sioux City Journal (Iowa) and Journal Star (Lincoln, Nebraska), Parade stated that 53 of them switched from USA Weekend, another top newspaper insert magazine, according to MediaPost.

Most of the new partners are in smaller cities and towns, which are "faring surprisingly well" in terms of circulation and ad revenue, compared to their larger metro daily counterparts, MediaPost reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2008-12-30 04:45

A newspaper in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States is thriving, not because it has found the best solutions online and across platforms, but instead because it "aggressively ignores" the Internet, The New York Times reported Sunday.

The TriCityNews is profitable in the double digits and has been growing by about 10 percent each year since its launch, in 1999. It has also recently published its biggest issue ever.

"I don't understand how putting content on the Web would do anything but help destroy our paper. Why should we give our readers any incentive whatsoever to not look at our content along with our advertisements, a large number of which are beautiful and cheap full-page ads?" Dan Jacobson, owner and publisher of the TriCityNews, told The New York Times.

Although Jacobson's newspaper is small, with just 3.5 employees (the half-timer is in charge of circulation) and a print run of 10,000, the TriCityNews has reliable advertisers and a set rate, which means almost anyone who wants to can advertise. Six columnists also write for the newspaper, in more of a blog style, and no one is working for sales commissions, The New York Times points out.

"There may come a time when the Web is all there is, and we will try to adapt,"Jacobson told The New York Times, "and if we don't, well, hey, we had a great run. But right now, the Web makes no business sense for us."

Tags

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2008-12-23 05:17

U.S. communications and polling expert Doug Schoen says that although the global recession, coupled with readers' migration to online, has financially hurt newspapers, it does not mean newspapers are facing extinction.

"While newspapers might not have a lot of money right now, what they do have is a dedicated, sought-after audience with a deep connection to and belief in the credibility of newspapers. To survive, newspapers must leverage these two critical components - audience and credibility - and more quickly adapt and innovate in a rapidly evolving media landscape," Schoen wrote in his column for the Huffington Post Friday.

Evidence of difficult times for the newspaper industry were seen everywhere in 2008, and experts all agree things will get worse before they get better. Yet, what will sustain newspapers are the two components they've always had, credibility and audience, he states.

Schoen writes that he recently conducted a poll for a book he is writing about the U.S. 2008 presidential election and economic crisis, and how people view media coverage of those two events. The results? More than three-fourths of adults and 84 percent of so-called elites read newspapers each day or a few times a week, either in print or online.

Further, of those polled, two-thirds said newspapers were informative on the election, and the same amount said newspapers led in covering the U.S. economic downturn.

Tags

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2008-12-20 02:38

The Honolulu Star-Bulletin merged its business and local news section on Monday, and also began printing one page of stock and mutual fund listings instead of two, all to create a separate section for its classified advertising, Pacific Business News reported. Previously, classifieds had been housed in the business section.

Cutting the stock listings in half "(reflects) the move by investors to the Internet for market quotes," said the Hawaiian paper's editor, Frank Bridgewater. The paper will also add two pages of "analysis, lists and highlights" to its business section on Sunday, due to heightened interest in economic news amid the stormy financial markets around the globe.

The sectional changes will also allow the newspaper to reduce its size by about two pages each day, said Publisher Dennis Francis, Pacific Business News reported.

Other newspapers in the United States have also either cut down on printing stock listings or completely eliminated them from print editions, to save money on newsprint and printing costs, according to Pacific Business News.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2008-12-16 12:16

Najaam Sethi, Editor-in-Chief of Friday Times and Daily Times in Pakistan,has been awarded the 2009 Golden Pen of Freedom, the annual press freedom prize of the World Association of Newspapers.

Sethi, whose newspapers advocate liberal and secular ideas in a country too-often torn by religious extremism, was honoured for his outstanding defense and promotion of press freedom under difficult circumstances and constant personal danger.

"Extremists have always used coercion to silence their critics and that is exactly what is happening now," Sethi says. "This is a battle that the media and the country cannot afford to lose."

Due to the editorial policies of the newspapers, which condemn autocracy and religious fundamentalism, Mr Sethi has been at odds with both Pakistani authorities and religious groups for many years. He has been threatened with death by the Taliban and other radical Muslim groups, and has been jailed and beaten for offending the government.

Najeem Sethi

"All journalists are aware of the dangers of inciting extremists who violently oppose reporting that is contrary to their view of the world," said the Board of the Paris-based WAN, meeting in Beirut, Lebanon, in making the award. Sethi has chosen, in a region fraught with such dangers, to brave them. His commitment to providing truthful and independent coverage in this region, despite great personal danger and sacrifice, is in the best traditions of journalism. We think the award will inspire others to resist such pressure."

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2008-12-15 13:03

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