Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Print Data

The Houston Chronicle has employed use of a Goss Metro press with digital inking, in order to reduce ink waste by 61 percent, Goss International announced in a press release.

Before the digital outfit, ink waste totalled an average of 5,500 kgs per week. Now ink waste is at an average of 1,927 kgs per week. Black ink waste was reduced the most, at 68 percent, and magenta rounded out the bottom end with a 46 percent reduction.

The conversion to digital ink also allowed for a press downtime reduction of 16 percent and a 23 percent increase in paper rolls per Web break, according to Goss.

"Ink may not be the most expensive element in offset printing, but its impact on quality, productivity and waste is immense," Michael Daniel, director of printing, said in the release.

The conversion is part of continuing development at the Chronicle to improve efficiency initiated in 2005, when general manager Matt Oliver set formal baselines for newsprint and ink waste and began tracking print productivity, using a technique called "Six Sigma."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-21 20:01

While newspapers have provided a plethora of print on their ongoing struggle to survive, the similar audience issues of network television in the United States has been neglected by TV news coverage, according to a University of Pennsylvania study released last week, The New York Times reported on Sunday.

While print and broadcast media have been facing similar audience degeneration, both media have focused primarily on the problems facing the newspaper industry.
"The television networks have basically not been very interested in talking about television's problems," said Michael X. Delli Carpini, dean of the university's Annenberg School of Communication and one of the study's authors, according to The Times article.

The study analysed reports from 26 major newspapers, the evening news from ABC, CBS, NBC and PBS, and the prime-time slots of CNN, CNBC, Fox News and MSNBC, dating from 2000 until 2009. Statistically the two media disciplines saw very similarly significant reductions in audience base. Evening television news has an audience of 23 million people every night, this is down from 32 million in 2000. Newspaper sales have fallen from 56 million per day in 2000 to 47 million, The Times reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-11 13:30

A study conducted by Martin Langeveld at the Nieman Journalism Lab found that only 3.5 percent of readers do their newspaper reading online only, the Columbia Journalism Review reported this week.

The study compares pages of printed newspapers viewed by readers with online pages visited by readers. "We don't have clear data about the average number pages each member of that audience looks at, but let's make an educated guess: 24. That translates to about 87.1 billion printed page views per month," Langeveld stated. As for online traffic, assuming that only one person is reading the online edition per hit, online newspapers "averaged 3.2 billion online page views per month" in 2008.

The online numbers may be slightly askew, as the article's author Ryan Chittum explains that numbers from a site's monitor, that counts actual traffic, and statistics that come from survey responses will always vary.

However, the findings remain surprising and hearken back to a 2006 study by The Pew Research Center, which found the online news audience to be "broader rather than deep."

Pew's study revealed that of the 6 percent of participants who said they read online newspapers, only 2 percent claimed to use online newspapers as their only news source.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-17 12:35

The Philadelphia Daily News will become an edition of the Inquirer beginning March 30, Editor & Publisher reported Monday. Philadelphia Media Holdings owns both titles, and decided to combine them, rather than fold the smaller Daily News.

CEO Brian Tierney said the decision should yield savings on wire service fees as well as increased advertisement revenues without requiring cutbacks in staff.

The two papers, whose combined daily circulation will be about 440,000, will be considered one paper by the Audit Bureau of Circulation. However, Daily News editor Michael Days maintains that the paper's passionate voice will be kept and that it will become a "unique edition of the Inquirer, and the emphasis is on the unique," E&P reported.

In an article appearing in the Boston Herald, Daily News publisher Mark Frisby claimed the move had nothing to do with the newspapers' bankruptcy filing on Feb. 22 and that the merger has been planned for more than a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-04 17:31

About 145 newspapers go on sale at newsstands across the Kashmir region each day, thanks to rising literacy rates, The National reported Friday.

In addition to daily newspapers, the region of Jammu and Kashmir has 188 weeklies and 94 monthly publications, and another 150 applications have ben filed to launch new newspapers. Top newspapers, such as the Kashmir Times, the Daily Exccelsior, the Greater Kashmir and Rising Kashmir, have reported their circulations are increasing by 2 percent to 5 percent every month.

The area's literacy rate is estimated at 65. 3 percent, up more than 10 percent, from 55 percent in 2001, according to authorities, The National reported.

The rising number of titles is also helped by the simplicity of registering and launching a new publication, Khalid Bashir Ahmed, the Kashmiri government's director of information, told The National.

Currently, the Daily Excelsior's circulation is at 148,000, the Kashmir Times is at 145,000, the Greater Kashmir is at 66,000 and Rising Kashmir's circulation is 40,000, according to The National.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-23 22:13

The year 2009 will be one of reckoning for the newspaper industry, as it will have to come up with a new plan of action, Walter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, said in a speech on Wednesday. In the past, newspapers relied on newsstand sales, subscriptions and advertisers, he said, and as the new business model relies only on the latter, it "makes for a wobbly stool even when the one leg is strong. When it weakens, the stool is likely to fall."

Newspapers that are solely dependent on ad dollars, instead of on readers, will also begin to cater to the advertisers, instead of serving the readers, Isaacson pointed out in his speech. This will lead to newspapers creating a lot of sections about "gardening and home improvement," while cutting other sections, such as book reviews.

"When a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, Dr. (Samuel) Johnson said, it concentrates the mind wonderfully. Those fortnights are upon us, and I suspect that 2009 will be remembered as the year that newspapers, followed by magazines and other content creators, realised that further rounds of cost-cutting will not stave off the hangman," Isaacson said in his speech, posted on the Aspen Institute Web site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-06 18:12

Trinity Mirror announced it will work with Pluck, the provider of social media capabilities to publishers, to build accessible online communities to improve reader interaction on its newspaper Web sites, including Mirror.co.uk, DailyRecord.co.uk and LiverpoolEcho.co.uk, The Business Wire reported.

"At the heart of our strategy is providing our users with a really engaging experience online," said David Black, Trinity Mirror's Group Director of Digital Publishing.

"By giving social media tools such as user comments, ratings and user profiles a key role on our websites, we will be creating an enhanced experience for our audience, who know they can rely on us to offer the best ways to discuss the most pertinent issues of the day," added Black, according to the Business Wire article posted on Cloud Computing Journal.

Pluck's technology platform offers social media capabilities to more than 300 online destinations, including the Guardian, Sky News, USA Today, Reuters and The Scotts-Miracle-Gro Company.

"Research is showing that those who are embracing social media tools are finding themselves ahead of the competition," according to Dave Panos, executive vice president of Pluck and its parent company, Demand Media, The Business Wire reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-26 22:14

Chicago-based Web start-up The Printed Blog is set to launch weekly newspapers containing reprinted blog postings on Tuesday in Chicago and San Francisco, Brand Republic reported Thursday.

Each newspaper will run the blog postings and other user-generated content, such as photos, along with about 200 advertisements.

Although the newspapers will start out as weeklies, The Printed Blog hopes to end up publishing up to two editions per day in many cities across the United States. The newspaper, which will be laid out like a blog, will be free, and supported by ads, according to Brand Republic. For example, larger cities such as Chicago could end up having up to 50 separate editions for individual neighbourhoods.

"There were so many techniques that I've seen working online that maybe I could apply to the print industry," Joshua Karp, founder and publisher of The Printed Blog, told The New York Times.

The hyperlocal blog content is hoped to attract local advertisers wanting to reach target audiences. Ads are expected to cost $15 to $25, and the paper will also house classifieds, according to Wired.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-22 21:31

Newspaper ad revenue in Poland was up by 5 percent year-over-year in 2008, according to a report by Wirtualnamedia.pl, Warsaw Business Journal reported.

The titles with the biggest percentage gain were Dziennik, a broadsheet, and Fakt, a tabloid.

However, Gazeta Wyborcza, a daily published by Agora, was on the top in terms of revenue - up zł.11.2 million to zł.1.009 billion year-over-year. Polska, a daily owned by Polskapresse, came next, with a zł.332 million growth in ad sales, Warsaw Business Journal reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-22 20:43

The Internet has surpassed newspapers in terms of an outlet for national and international news, according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, Media Post reported.

The latest research showed that 40 percent of the respondents said they get most of their national and international news online, compared to merely 24 percent in September 2007. It was the first time more people chose the Web than printed newspapers.

Television remained as being cited most frequently as a source for national and international news, Media Post reported.

Among younger people, between ages 18 to 29, the Web is now even with television as a main source of national and international news, with 59 percent of respondents saying so. In September 2007, only 34 percent said they relied on the Web mostly for news, compared to 68 percent for television.

The survey, conducted by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, surveyed 1,489 adults during Dec. 3-7, 2008, Media Post reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-20 05:38

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