Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Print Data

To save on print production costs and to streamline operations, Tribune Co. papers the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune are rolling out changes this week and next. The LA Times today launched LATExtra, a new section that includes local and California coverage, as well as late-breaking news. It has also trimmed an inch off its print version, and is now 11 inches wide, LA Times Blogs reported today.

The Chicago Tribune, meanwhile, will also trim an inch from the width of its newspaper beginning Monday, according to MediaPost.

The circumstances surrounding LATExtra, which will run Monday through Saturday, led to criticism last month when the announcement was made. The deadline for the LA Times' front page was moved up a few hours, to 6 p.m., because the Times closed its Orange County printing plant and sold its print run time slot at the remaining plant to the Wall Street Journal. Therefore, late-breaking news is now published in LATExtra.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-03 00:55

As part of a €600 million aid package, the French government is buying newspaper subscriptions for young readers, the Christian Science Monitor reported today.

Readers between ages 18 and 24 will receive a one-year subscription to the paper of their choice as part of the bailout. The offer is open to the first 200,000 who sign up for "Mon Journal Offer," and they can choose from 60 newspapers.
Ouest France is an example of one newspaper that has grown young readership by giving away free newspapers. It began doing so four years ago, and increased readership for 18-to 24-year-olds by 22,000, with almost 12 percent resubscribing after their free subscription ended, according to the CSM.

For more on young readers, visit the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers' Young Readers programme.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-15 20:27

NBC's New York Telemundo station, WNJU, announced today it will restructure in order to better produce news for multiple platforms, MediaWeek reported. In doing so, the station has created a new position, vice president of content.

Better measuring online readership, meanwhile, is another important next step in a multi-platform world, the Guardian pointed out yesterday. "In a fragmented media world, the paper is just one way among many to publish a story," the article stated, using The New York Times as an example.

The New York Times saw a 7 percent decline in paid circulation between April and September, according to Nielsen figures, out Monday. However, its Web site, NYTimes.com, had 21 million unique users in the United States, while its mobile site had 40 million pageviews in September and more than two million readers downloaded the paper's iPhone app since it launched in July of last year.

Overall, U.S. newspaper readership dropped 10.6 percent on weekdays and 7.5 percent on Sundays in the six months ending Sept. 30, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, The New York Times reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 16:09

"The news industry has so far failed to make the digital transition," according to veteran industry analyst Ken Doctor in the new Outsell report "Top 15 U.S. New Companies Print-to-Digital Market Size and Share," MediaPost reported.

According to Doctor, newspapers only made 11 percent of their overall revenues from digital sources, including both advertising and circulation, in 2008. Even the best performers in the industry, the Washington Post Co. and News Corp., marked quite low proportions of online revenue in the overall profits (15 percent and 14 percent, respectively).

However, compared to the rest of the information industry, news providers seem to underperform on this. While the percentage of news revenues derived from digital sources increased from 7.2 percent in 2006 to 11 percent in 2008, the rest of the information industry, which excludes news providers, was up from 65.3 percent to 70.2 percent. This shows that newspapers were still far behind while other sectors had almost already substantially completed the revenue transition from print to digital, Media Post reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-27 18:23

Teenagers use social media much more heavily than their parents think they do, according to a study by Common Sense Media, a non-profit firm that tracks media use by children, out this week.

A poll, conducted by The Benenson Strategy Group, showed that teens increasingly rely on social networking to connect with friends, classmates and people with similar interests, with 51 percent responding that they check social networking sites more than once a day. Meanwhile, just 23 percent of parents said they thought their kids check the sites more than once per day.

Other key findings, according to the poll:

- 22% of teens check social networking sites more than 10 times a day, while only 4% of parents believe kids are checking that much
- 28% have shared personal information they normally wouldn't have shared in public
- 25% have shared a profile with a false identity
- 39% have posted something they regretted
- 26% have pretended to be someone else online
- 54% have joined an online community or Facebook/MySpace group in support of a cause
- 34% have volunteered for a campaign, nonprofit, or charity

For the full poll results, visit Common Sense Media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-13 21:56

The London Evening Standard will no longer be part of the monthly national newspaper audit after choosing to reclassify as a regional newspaper with respect to the classification of circulation statistics, according to a Media Guardian report on Friday.

The Audit Bureau of Circulations has confirmed that the newspaper made a last minute decision to remove itself from the national listings, just before newspaper sales figures for June were released.

Although regional newspapers usually report to the ABC every six months, the Evening Standard will offer monthly reports on its circulation, which will not receive publication in the national newspaper sales audit data.

The change comes on the back of management frustration with the Audit Bureau's representation of the Standard's circulation figures for May. The newspaper was relaunched on May 11 with new pricing and distribution, a fact the management did not believe would be reflected until June's figures.

The Standard's statistics for June saw an average daily circulation of 236,075. Sixty-one percent of the paper's readership was from paying customers, 30 percent from bulks - the copies sent to hotels and airlines for greatly reduced prices - and 8 percent coming from free copies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-13 17:38

The National Digital Newspaper Program on Tuesday celebrated the digitalization of 1 million pages onto its government funded, free access Web site, the Associated Press reported.

This total has already increased to 1.2 million pages and staff believe the archive should eventually reach 20 million pages, extending back to 1836 and covering until 1922 where newspapers began to be copyrighted. The collection is available at the Library of Congress' Chronicling America Web site.

The project has allowed access to initial reactions to some of the most important events of 19th and early 20th century.

"Flying Machine that will Work: Ohio Boys have Solved a Big Mechanical Problem," reads the Palestine Daily Herald in Texas in 1903 and The San Francisco Call-Chronicle-Examiner threatened in 1906: "Entire City of San Francisco in Danger of Being Annihilated."

Some historic predictions were discovered to be a little off, as the Ocala Evening Star from Florida predicted the 1907 popularity of stuffed toys was a passing trend, "The Teddy bear craze is dying out," read the headline.

The site has catalogued both major daily newspapers as well as smaller local publications. Mark Sweeney, the projects co-coordinator, said this allows for an interesting perspective as "you can get a very different take on the news."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-17 18:26

Australian newspaper publishers have started a multimillion-dollar fight for the right to conduct the country's first industry-funded and managed readership survey, The Age reported Thursday. As a result of an extended dispute with longtime research provider Roy Morgan, the survey has been offered to local and international researchers for tender.

The industry based readership survey was initiated two weeks ago by industry group Newspaper Works, a product of Fairfax Media, West Australian Newspapers, APN News & Media and News Ltd.

Roy Morgan was yesterday told of the group's decision to tender the survey shortly before a media briefing. The company's chief executive, Michele Levine, said the company would boycott the tender process and offer its own independent industry data analysis service.

"The real issue is control and independence," Levine said, according to The Age. "We're not going to stop our survey. We won't bid. We're going to keep conducting our survey and selling the data and the market will decide which information it believes - that which comes from newspapers or independent data."

Newspaper Works chief executive Tony Hale said he hoped Roy Morgan would bid for the contract, saying he is "not making a judgment" on data quality.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-11 20:16

BARCELONA - Knowing your audience is the key to success on any platform, as newspapers presenting at the World Association of Newspapers' Power of Print conference in Barcelona showed Thursday.

Francis Matthew, editor-at-large of the Gulf News in the UAE; Fergus Sampson, CEO of emerging markets at Media24, which owns The Daily Sun, in South Africa; and Tim Wall, editor-in-chief of the Moscow News, Russia, all represented their own vastly different publications that have one thing in common: they are succeeding in print thanks to fitting with audience needs' perfectly.

Gulf News

Print is "alive and well" in the UAE for three main reasons:

  • Reporting
  • Classifieds
  • Distribution

The Gulf News in particular dominates in the region because it is inclusive to the entire UAE population, as only 15 percent of the UAE's population is native, and the population has doubled in the past 15 years.

The Daily Sun, Media24

Just five years after its launch, Media24-owned The Daily Sun grew to become the largest newspaper in South Africa, with a circulation of 500,000, all by finding, understanding and staying loyal to an under-served, and even non-served audience, said Fergus Sampson, CEO of emerging markets at Media24.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 18:10

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