Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Print Data

Ad sales for most newspaper publishers in U.S. were less bad in the second quarter of this year, compared to the previous quarter.

However, "less bad is not the same as good," according to the Business Insider, which pointed out that the outlook for the rest of the year is "decidedly murky".

According to the financial results reported to date by the publicly traded publishing companies, the average sales for the industry in the second quarter will drop about 7 percent to 8 percent, making it the least decline since the fall of 2007, Reflections of a Newsosaur reported.

In addition, this period will be an improvement from the 9.7 percent industry decrease in print and online sales in the first quarter, and from the 29 percent sales plunge year-over-year.

Among the seven publicly traded U.S. publishers who have already released second-quarter results, six of them reported better quarterly sales except for A.H. Belo. The strongest performer was the New York Times.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-02 20:31

Newspapers in developed nations are generally facing steeper declines in advertising revenues, titles and circulations than their counterparts in more developing countries, a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development shows.

The Paris-based think tank said overall, however, the industry is finding new sources of revenue, while publishers in developing countries are continuing to grow their readership numbers, Canwest News service reported today. The report, "The Future of News and the Internet," examines the news business in 31 OECD member countries.

Chart: OECD (click on chart to enlarge)
In some of these countries, more than 50 percent read newspapers online (in Korea that number is 77 percent), but at the very least, 20 percent read online newspapers, the report states. However, willingness to pay for news online "remains low." And the share of people getting their news from online-only sources is expected to "grow rapidly with new generations who start using the Internet early in life. The real concern is that a significant proportion of young people are not reading conventional news at all."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-14 19:52

"Revenues set to stabilise in 2010-11, but long-term outlook is still negative," the title of the latest forecast for the U.S. newspaper industry released by Moody's Investor Services pointed out a "very cautiously optimistic forecast," Media Post reported.

According to the report, newspaper ad revenues will drop another 10 percent to 15 percent this year, but "may" finally bounce back in 2011, as the forecast for next year is ambiguous, ranging from another 3 percent decline to a 2 percent growth.

It's not such bad news for the industry as ad revenue plunged 22 percent in 2009, the Associated Press reported. The ratings agency still rated the outlook for the industry "Stable," according to analyst John Puchallain.

However, Moody's warns that in 2012 ad revenues could turn negative again and stay stagnant in subsequent years, which indicates "continuing long-term structural shifts away from print to digital advertising," according to the AP article posted on Business Week.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-04 23:32

According to the latest data released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations Electronic, Mail Online stayed on the top as the most visited UK newspaper Web site in April, Media Guardian reported.

Associated Newspapers' Web site network had more than 2.3 million combined average daily browsers in April, up 5.33 percent month-over-month and 74.5 percent year-over-year.

Mail Online was also the first newspaper website in the country to reach 40 million monthly uniques in April, Media Guardian reported.

The second spot went to Guardian.co.uk again, with more than 1.8 million average daily browsers. Telegraph.co.uk was ranked third, with just under 1.6 million.

News International eschewed its websites from the ABCe audit last month, as the content from the Times and Sunday Times will go behind a paywall in June, followed by the Sun and News of the World later.

Most newspaper Web sites now use daily visitor numbers on average as the headline measurement figure, as it seems to be more representative than a monthly user figure, according to Media Guardian.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-31 18:27

U.S. newspaper sites continue to see increases Web traffic, according to the latest comScore figures released by the Newspaper National Network. Online newspaper operations in the top 25 media markets drew 83.7 million unique visitors in April 2010, up 10 percent from March, 12 percent from February, and 15 percent from January, Media Post reported.

Total page views in April reached more than two billion, compared to 1.6 billion page views in January.

The top 10 markets gained the number of unique visitors by 15 percent from 61.5 million in January to 70.8 million in April. Total page views boosted 27 percent from 1.1 billion to 1.4 billion. This outperformed the total U.S. Internet market, as Internet population, according to comScore, only increased 2 percent from 209 million to 213 million over the same period. Total page views of the whole market grew 6 percent from 533.6 billion to 567.3 billion, according to Media Week.

Moreover, newspaper sites reported bigger percentage increases than competitors including CNN.com and Huffington Post, which unique visitors stayed flat at about 43.4 million and dropped 3 percent from 22.8 million to 22.2 million, respectively.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-25 23:03

Australian newspaper circulations in Q1 continued to go down due to lack of news, declining consumer spending and tight marketing budgets, according to the latest data from the the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the Australian Financial Review reported.

National and metropolitan titles have the circulation down by an average of 3 percent year-over-year, Media Guardian reported.

Out of 25 capital city and national newspapers, only Fairfax Media Ltd.'s Sunday Age had its sales up, by 0.5 percent. Others' combined sales declined 3.1 percent to 20.7 million, Bloomberg reported.

The hardest hit went to Australian Financial Review, with its weekday edition down 8.6% to 75,624 copies and the Saturday edition down 6.6 percent to 91,735.

The Australian's weekday sales decreased by 4.4 percent to 132,690 copies, while the weekend was down 3.7 percent to 304,548 copies, Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-14 22:09

Printed newspapers will probably survive a decade before digital news completely substitutes for it, according to James Tyree, chief executive of investment firm Mesirow Financial Inc., who also led the October buyout of the Chicago Sun-Times' publisher, Bloomberg reported.

"Newspapers have got a good strong 10 years. By then you'll have to evolve into something else - maybe five years evolve into something else - or you'll just be out of business," said Tyree in an interview in Chicago last week.

Sun-Times Media Holdings LLC, the company publishes eight dailies in Illinois and Indiana, will need to shift its focus from its printed newspapers to more original online content, such as in-depth sports and regional political coverage, added Tyree. He purchased this company and ended its seven-month bankruptcy, Bloomberg reported.

U.S. publishers have eliminated jobs and sections, and sold assets top compensate declining advertising revenue. According to Newspaper Association of America data, in 2009, print ad sales dropped to their lowest since 1984, while digital advertising also fell 12 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-06 19:44

As a part of the Tribune Co.'s efforts to reduce costs and direct resources to focus on local coverage, the Daily Press of Newport News, Virginia will outsource page design, formatting and editing pages to the company's flagship paper, the Chicago Tribune. This announcement came to the staff at both the newspapers on Monday, the Tribune reported.

The transfer of responsibilities from the Daily Press suggests elimination of copy editors and designers, Hampton Roads reported. The newsroom staff will likely be reduced by 15 percent, Digby Solomon, president and chief executive of the Daily Press, told the Tribune.
"We're going to have to learn how to really focus our resources on that which really differentiates us. For us, that's the local stuff. This allows us to save some money on personnel ... without impacting the reporters, columnists, photographers who are out generating uniquely local content," he said, according to the Tribune.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-10 23:41

Belgium's La Derniere Heure released an edition Tuesday in which all photos and advertisements are in 3D, and readers are given cardboard 3D glasses with every copy, ABC News reported today. Text is not three-dimensional.

It took two months to create the 3D edition, which had a print run of 115,000, higher than usual. Editor Hubert Leclercq told ABC News that the paper was following the trend of the recent rise in popularity of 3D films, television and video games.

However, future 3D editions have not been planned, due to high production costs.

Leclercq said is is not aware of other European papers publishing full 3D editions, although 3D images have appeared in the press before, 9 News reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 23:40

News International Commercial has launched outdoor and print advertisements that aim to show the power of newspapers and magazines, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today.

The ads are based on research from Microsoft Advertising, which in December stated that for large retailers, print advertising is more effective than online ads, and more than twice as effective as television ads. Each £1 spent on print ads garner £5 in revenue, while TV and Internet ads bring in £2.15 and £3.44, respectively.

The News International ads state "For every £1 spent on advertising by retailers, newspapers and magazines deliver £6.41 in sales - more than any other media and 164% greater than TV."

The campaign will run across all News International titles for two weeks, beginning yesterday in The Sunday Times, according to a press release.

Participants of the Microsoft survey of 26 large UK retailers were anonymous, but included fashion retailers, department stores, large grocery retailers and big clothing stores. Twenty-four of the participants were "in the top 100 UK companies" when it comes to media expenditure.

News International is the main UK subsidiary of News Corporation. It publishes The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-08 23:58

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation