Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


Ownership and Regulations

A group of Dominican investors have bought the 121-year-old Listin Diario and its radio stations, The Associated Press revealed yesterday.

Although the value of the Aug. 10 transaction was not disclosed, the president of the Central Bank, Héctor Valdez Albizu, said the operation had covered the $51.8 million debt that the media company had with the government, ElMasacre.com reported. The group of investors include media mogul José Luis Corripio and Juan Bautista Vicini Lluberes, whose family owns the sugar giant Vicini Group, ABC.es reminded.

The Central Bank seized the Editora Listí­n Diario in 2003 after its owner Ramón Báez Figeoroa, who at the time was also the head of the Dominican Republic's second largest bank, was accused of fraud. The government negotiated the newspaper's sale for more than a year.

In a statement published in the newspaper, the new shareholders said they remained committed "to preserve and be faithful to the historical legacy of Listin Diario."

The daily, which was founded in 1889, has an average circulation of 60,000 copies.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-31 17:10

Yesterday The Associated Press reported that Google and the AP have updated their licensing deal for online content. Specifics of the arrangement were not released to the public, although there are two main factors in the deal: Google will purchase the AP's content for an undisclosed amount, and the two companies will also collaborate to increase the AP's online revenue. The terms of the contact may not be dramatically different from previous licensing contracts, yet the recent announcement marks a shift in more diplomatic relations between the AP and Google.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-31 16:54

Global online recruiting site Monster has completed its acquisition of Yahoo!'s HotJobs for $225 million (£145 million), Recruiter reported.

Monster also inked a three-year commercial traffic agreement with Yahoo!. According to the deal, Monster will become Yahoo!'s provider of career content and will pay $20 million to $31 million a year to Yahoo! for the redirected traffic, Boston Herald reported.

The deal helps Monster expand its reach into U.S. The combined unique visitors of Monster and HotJobs will reach 130 million, which accounted for 62 percent of total U.S. online population. It also helps expand Monster's newspaper partnerships from 400 to 1,000, thanks to 600 HotJobs newspapers providing local reach in all 50 states, CNET reported.

Yahoo will place Monster on its home page in both U.S. and Canada.

"The combination of Monster and HotJobs gives European employers simple and rapid access to a bigger pool of candidates based in U.S. This is a significant strategic advantage for employers that are competing on a global stage for the best talent," said Andrea Bertone, head of Monster Europe.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-25 18:33

A committee representing U.S. media groups is calling on South African President Jacob Zuma to end legislative proposals they say would "severely restrict" media in the country, Times Live reported yesterday.

"We call on you as the head of state and leader of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) to ensure that such proposals are either amended in line with constitutional safeguards for freedom of the press and access to information, or withdrawn altogether in the interest of preserving the transparency, accountability, and democracy gained after apartheid," the Committee to Protect Journalists wrote. The committee includes The New York Times, NBC News, the Washington Post and others.

Image: blackchristiannews.com
Over the weekend, Zuma, who has been the subject of "embarrassing stories about his private life," announced that the tribunal would help to defend the rights of citizens, the Financial Times reported. In addition, several of Zuma's ministers have been criticised by the press for using taxpayer money to "fund luxurious lifestyles."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-17 21:34

In the second quarter, The Newspaper Association of America spent US$290,000 lobbying the federal government on issues such as the future of media, privacy and legislation aimed at making government information public, according to The Associated Press article posted on Business Week.

The amount was up from $250,000 in the previous quarter, as well as $278,000 in the same quarter of 2009, according to a Congressional disclosure form.

Photo: Media Bistro

The Newspaper Association of America represents about 2,000 newspapers in the country. It lobbied the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives on a proposed measure called the Free Flow of Information Act, which would protect reporters in some cases from "having to obey court orders to reveal confidential sources, a protection that media organisations argue would encourage more whistle blowers to come forward," The AP reported.

The group also lobbied on the Federal Communications Commission's Future of Media Project, which would influence federal policy on media ownership.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-17 21:25

The South African government is debating the role of the press and government control over keeping federal information secret after the country's ruling political party, the African National Congress, has backed proposals to tighten controls on the media, Reuters Africa reported yesterday.

The proposed tribunal would control print media in order to "enhance accountability and improve reporting," a senior ruling party official said, the article explained. The Media Appeals Tribunal would investigate complaints against print media, and decide on punishments when it deems irresponsible reporting has taken place, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Image: ANC spokesman Jackson Mthembu. Photo via Times Live

Media groups have denounced the ANC's proposition, saying the tribunal is an attempt by the party to stop investigative reporters who expose corruption in the one-party ruled government, according to Reuters.

Over the weekend, 37 newspapers voiced their dismay over the ANC "clampdown" at an event called the "Auckland Park Declaration," iol.co.za reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-11 15:57

UK communications regulator Ofcom has recommended relaxing cross-media ownership rules so that the only restriction left would be that one body cannot own local newspapers with more than a 50 percent market share, the ITV licence for the area and a local radio station. Now, however, Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport Secretary Jeremy Hunt is asking the regulator to consider further liberalising that rule as well, The Press Association reported today.

Because local media is facing "significant economic pressure," Ofcom has said it will review the rules.

However, the regulator did point out its concern that combined ownership could give a company or one person too much control over local news.

"Limited plurality of news and opinion in a local area could restrict local debate and accountability," Ofcom said today, according to MediaGuardian. "This remains a serious consideration which needs to be weighed against the arguments for further relaxation."

Factors that would ensure plurality remain, however, MediaGuardian reported. These include: the government's plans to develop a network of local TV stations, the presence of the BBC across the United Kingdom and the power of competition authorities to step in when mergers present possible risks to plurality.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-09 20:52

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission today called off closed-door talks it was having with lobbyists on network neutrality, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The announcement came a day after news reports broke that an unannounced deal between mobile phone giant Verizon Communications Inc. and Google Inc. on their own network management practices had been made. Under the agreement, Verizon would have been able to prioritize some broadband traffic.

Image: A protester shows support for network neutrality in Canada in 2008.

Net neutrality means that no form of content is favoured over another. The opposite of net neutrality is a tiered system, which imposes costs based on levels of service. This means higher costs are levelled on premium levels of service, such as with cable television.

The FCC's negotiations have "not generated a robust framework to preserve the openness and freedom of the Internet - one that drives innovation, investment, free speech and consumer choice," Edward Lazarus, the FCC's chief of staff, said in a statement, according to PCWorld. "All options remain on the table as we continue to seek broad input on this vital issue."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-06 00:00

Rwanda's regulatory body has suspended 30 media organisations for not meeting requirements set by the new media law, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) denounced on Monday, Agence France-Presse reported.

"With just a week to go to a presidential election on 9 August, the Rwandan authorities are openly flouting the rules of the democratic game," the organisation stated in a press release. Last week, the Media High Council published a list of 22 newspapers and 19 TV and radio stations that "meet the requirements of the law and therefore [are] legally recognized in Rwanda," the authorities said in a statement, allAfrica.com quoted.

Photo: Umuseso and Umuvugizi are among the banned newspapers
Under the law approved in August 2009, all media should be registered with the council, despite having been approved by the regulatory body in previous years. It also imposed the capital necessary to open new outlets and granted the council the power to suspend newspapers and impose criminal penalties on journalists.

Now, those excluded from the list - including leading dailies like Umuseso, Umuvugizi and Umurabayo - are not allowed to publish information.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-04 17:24

Azerbaijan's Press Council today published its newest list of "racketeer" publications, which includes 77 newspapers and journals that the group says have violated the country's Journalists' Professional Behavior Rules, the Azerbaijan Press Agency reported.

"This list is a tool for public condemnation of the press, which ignore the professional principles, publish materials, affecting the honor and dignity of people, slander, and commit other such illegal actions," the chairman of the Press Council Aflutun Amashov said, Trend News Agency quoted.

"It envisages not legal, but public responsibility, and publishing the 'black list' aims to form society's reaction to the media of bad tendency," he said while remembering that the named publications are subject to investigation.

Some of the newspapers on the list, which includes the names of the editor-in-chief and the founder of each publication, are Nota, Mufatish, Khalg Nazareti, Ganun ve Gercheklik, Ideal Azerbaijan, Ideal and Taran, News.az revealed.

So far, the largest list that the Press Council has published was presented last year and it included 95 newspapers.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-03 19:55

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