Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Ownership and Regulations

Russian publishing group News Media Rus has found that it can make more money by selling its video content than it can by running online advertising. The group, which also owns daily newspaper Zhizn, newssite Life News and business outlet Marker.ru, announced that all of its images and video content will now used by TV channel NTV, Lenta.ru wrote Monday. According to Vedomosti, the venture began on Sept. 1, and the agreement between the publisher and TV channel will last for a year, with an extension possibilities.

"...it turned out that the direct sale of video can bring more revenue than the promotion of a site and then publish it on its Internet advertising," Sostav.ru reported. Previously, the publisher let news platforms use its content for free, provided that they cite their sources. News Media Rus Operation Director Ashot Gabrelyanov revealed to Vedomosti that on average around 30 video clips were used by TV channels such as REN TV, NTV and government-operated Perviy.

At first, the firm was gathering content for Life News and transmitting them to TV channels in order to promote the site, WebPlanet.ru informed. However, it was predicted that video content could offer significantly higher earnings than Web-based advertising on the site.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-21 21:23

Russian state-owned news agency RIA Novosti and publishing house Vremya have announced a re-branding strategy for daily newspaper Vremya Novostei, which involves the title being renamed "Moskovskie Novosti" by the beginning of 2011, Russkaya Gazeta informed today.

"We are convinced that the base newspaper Vremya Novostei and RIA Novosti will create the most modern newspaper, that will use all sorts of formats and platforms to produce and deliver content to readers," said RIA Novosti's director Svetlana Mironyuk. "The combination of information-gathering possibilities that the agency has and the distribution channels that 'Moskovskie Novosti' will have will provide a huge synergy for all the members of the project."

Moskovskie Novostie" was launched in 1930 as an English-language daily (called The Moscow News) oriented towards foreigners residing on Russian territory. In around 20 years, the paper began publishing in Russian. During the Gorbachev era, the paper was considered as the "authoritative" and "powerful" daily, Russkaya Gazeta mentioned. Svoboda News added that it used to be the leading democratic title.

Following the fall of the Soviet Union, "Moskovskie Novosti" saw plunging readership. It saw

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-21 18:13

The Financial Times is calling on UK Business Secretary Vince Cable to open an investigation of the possible takeover of satellite broadcaster BSkyB by News Corporation, saying it is "unlikely to encounter insuperable obstacles as the deal may well not fall foul of European competition law."

News Corp already owns a 39.1 percent minority stake in BSkyB, the Pearson Group-owned FT points out, and adds that Cable should investigate to "ensure the existence of a range of media voices," as together, News Corp and BSkyB "would be a truly formidable beast," with 37 percent of UK national newspaper circulation coming from a News Corp-owned publication, while Sky has 35 percent of the TV market, based on revenue.

"But access to Sky's substantial cash flows (rather than a taxed dividend, as at present) would give Mr Murdoch substantial firepower to cross-subsidise his loss-making UK newspapers, enabling them to compete with rivals more on price. Price wars are an established stratagem for News. In the 1990s, it grew the circulation of the Times through savage price cuts," the article states. "The UK newspaper industry as a whole is struggling, as it is in many parts of the world. Were Mr Murdoch to embark on fresh price wars, more rival papers would be marginalised - or even forced from the news stands."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-20 23:05

Three months after the Fijian regime issued a decree ordering media outlets to be 90 percent owned by local citizens, News Limited agreed on Tuesday to sell The Fiji Times to Motibhai & Co, The Wall Street Journal reported.

"We are reluctant sellers of the Fiji Times, but I am delighted that we have been able to find a buyer who will take over the business as a going concern," News Ltd. Chairman John Hartigan said, Agence France-Presse quoted.

Motibhai & Co's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Mahendra Motibhai Patel, a Fijian businessman who had previously served in the newspaper board, said in statement published in the Fiji Times that the company was committed to "respect and enhanced" the legacy of the oldest daily in the country.

Although the terms of the sale were not made public, Patel said the name of the paper's publisher would be revealed in a week, Radio Australia reported. "We can't announce his name yet because we are going through the formalities. He is a very innovative person. He's well versed in journalism," he said.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-17 15:48

News aggregation has been around about as long as the Internet itself, but the problem of what is legal and what is not legal is still being hotly debated and litigated in the courts. Still, the notion that aggregators are hurting the news publishing industry is supported by many, such as News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch and Associated Press Dean Singleton, a white paper, by Kimberley Isbell, of the Citizen Media Law Project, explains. And the argument isn't likely to be solved soon.

The Nieman Journalism Lab has reproduced the report, which explains the legality of various types of news aggregation. Although the paper is based on copyright laws in the United States, it is "likely to be a useful point of reference for anyone dealing in online content," Journalism.co.uk noted.

Image via NYC Comets' Flickr photostream
Isbell, explains:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-10 20:51

Google is getting the first "broad" anti-trust review of its U.S.-related search and advertising initiatives by Texas-based Attorney General Greg Abbott, The Guardian reported Sunday.

According to IT Pro Portal, the probe will evaluate the mechanism behind the search engine giant's Web-ranking system. Google Deputy General Counsel Don Harrison explained in a blog post that the company was "looking forward" to the inquiry because it is "confident that Google operates in the best interests" of the users.

The news comes in light of complaints issued by shopping comparison sites MyTriggers (U.S.) and Foundem (UK) as well as SourceTool (U.S.), an e-commerce site working for businesses, The Associated Press explained last week. Features that are offered by the sites show up on Google searches, but The Guardian mentioned that Google is being accused of deliberately slicing the sites' traffic by lowering their search rankings.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-07 16:09

As part of its digital initiative, newspaper supplement company Publishing Group of America has replaced former CEO Dick Porter with John Cobb III, MediaWeek reported Wednesday. Cobb, who was previously consulting PGA, has experience in digital and experience publishing and has emphasised that he would work on expanding the Internet content that the publisher offers to its partner papers.

"Each one of them really fills a niche," Cobb said, when asked about the PGA supplements, "We want to grow the brands and support their partners. It'll also give us an opportunity to provide information to their local sites."

Cobb is the former senior vice president of digital at Source Interlink Media, where he was in charge of more than 100 Web ventures, Folio wrote. Cobb explained that the PGA is "committed to providing value to our newspaper partners and a high-quality medium for national advertisers to reach valuable local markets," stressing that the company was aiming for "explosive growth" in digital projects.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-06 16:03

The latest addition to the list of potential buyers of French daily Le Parisien includes Serge Dassault, the owner of right-leaning Le Figaro, Le Monde reported yesterday. Other interested parties include prominent German publisher Axel Springer and UK-based Mecom.

Bolloré, the French publisher of free dailies Direct Matin and Direct Soir, said that it was looking at all the options on the table. President Vincent Bolloré (left) said on Wednesday that the possible acquisition was "interesting" but that it poses "a certain number of problems" for a firm like his, AFP said. He added that the daily had quality content, an important logistics base and views that did not contradict those of his dailies, according to Les Echos.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-03 13:36

Tribune Co.'s board of directors has formed a special committee with four independent board members to oversee its Chapter 11 plan as lenders withdrew from supporting a restructuring plan, Bloomberg reported.

Lawyers for the publisher told a Delaware bankruptcy judge weeks ago that JPMorgan Chase and distressed-debt specialist Angelo, Gordon & Co. had dropped out a settlement agreement, which would have left them among the company's new owners, Philly.com reported.

The four board members include Board Chairman Mark Shapiro, Jeffrey S. Berg, Maggie Wilderotter and Frank Wood, according to the Associated Press article posted on Google News.

Based on a court filing Tuesday, the committee will review and approve a bankruptcy plan and resolve legal claims against Tribune, including claims stemming from its leverage buyout.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-01 18:13

The UK-based Advertising Standards Authority will be expanding control to corporate websites, social networks and mobile applications from March 2011, the Financial Times reports. The ASA will have the right to ask that paid-for links leading to banned ads be removed and will be able to include ads announcing that certain advertisers are not complying with regulations, according to MediaGuardian.

The new guidelines will permit the ASA to give ads on sites like YouTube and Facebook the same attention as ads on TV, radio or in newspapers. Google is supplying the ASA with £200,000 funds for the extension and the rest will come from the 0.1 percent voluntary levy on paid-for ads, MediaGuardian explained.

"Extending the online remit of the ASA has been a top priority for UK industry over the last couple of years. Our aim has been to extend further in the online world the principles that are already well established in our system, namely those of effective consumer protection and fair competition," said Chairman of the Committee of Advertising Andrew Brown, whose company writes the regulations for the ASA.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-01 14:36

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